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  • Dear Leader Chairman Maobama choppers into Yosemite to babble some nonsense.

    President Obama visited Yosemite National Park via helicopter, to demand an end to people paying “lip service” to natural beauty and the climate crisis.
    Obama at Yosemite attacks ‘lip service’ to natural beauty amid climate inaction


    Barack Obama warned on Saturday that climate change could ravage many of America’s vaunted national parks, criticizing political opponents who “pay lip service” to areas of natural beauty while opposing efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

    During a visit to Yosemite national park, Obama said climate change was “no longer a threat, it’s a reality”. The first sitting president to visit Yosemite since John F Kennedy in 1962 said the famed glacial valley was already experiencing changes due to rising temperatures.

    [...]

    https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/06/...e-lip-service/

    Any guesses as to the carbon footprint of Dear Leader Chairman Maobama and his entourage to California and then helicoptering them to Yosemite National Park to babble nonsense about a mythical crisis?

    If I feel motivated tomorrow, I might run the numbers.

    I couldn't get past this sentence without ROTFLMFAO...
    The first sitting president to visit Yosemite since John F Kennedy in 1962 said the famed glacial valley was already experiencing changes due to rising temperatures.

    No schist, Sherlock... all "glacial valley[s] [have been] experiencing changes due to rising temperatures" since the Late Pleistocene...

    Every glacial valley on the face of the Earth exists for one reason: CLIMATE CHANGE!!!
    Last edited by The Doctor; 19 Jun 16, 21:56.
    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

  • #2
    Doc, I'm really worried about you. Its not healthy to hold everything in! Maybe you ought to try sharing what's on your mind a little more.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
      Doc, I'm really worried about you. Its not healthy to hold everything in! Maybe you ought to try sharing what's on your mind a little more.
      That was my toned down, edited version... the uncut, original edition included 43 F-bombs and every synonym for "moron" in 14 different languages...

      Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

      Comment


      • #4
        Narcissists are always finding ways to bring attention to themselves.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
          That was my toned down, edited version... the uncut, original edition included 43 F-bombs and every synonym for "moron" in 14 different languages...

          Sure you don't remember being a DI from the late '70's?

          I do. I could post my favorite rant. But this is a pg-13 forum...

          PS. Only reused one word twice.

          Last edited by Bwaha; 19 Jun 16, 22:47.
          Credo quia absurdum.


          Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

          Comment


          • #6
            Attached Files
            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
              President Obama visited Yosemite National Park via helicopter, to demand an end to people paying “lip service” to natural beauty and the climate crisis.
              Obama at Yosemite attacks ‘lip service’ to natural beauty amid climate inaction


              Barack Obama warned on Saturday that climate change could ravage many of America’s vaunted national parks, criticizing political opponents who “pay lip service” to areas of natural beauty while opposing efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

              During a visit to Yosemite national park, Obama said climate change was “no longer a threat, it’s a reality”. The first sitting president to visit Yosemite since John F Kennedy in 1962 said the famed glacial valley was already experiencing changes due to rising temperatures.

              [...]

              https://wattsupwiththat.com/2016/06/...e-lip-service/

              Any guesses as to the carbon footprint of Dear Leader Chairman Maobama and his entourage to California and then helicoptering them to Yosemite National Park to babble nonsense about a mythical crisis?

              If I feel motivated tomorrow, I might run the numbers.

              I couldn't get past this sentence without ROTFLMFAO...
              The first sitting president to visit Yosemite since John F Kennedy in 1962 said the famed glacial valley was already experiencing changes due to rising temperatures.

              No schist, Sherlock... all "glacial valley[s] [have been] experiencing changes due to rising temperatures" since the Late Pleistocene...

              Every glacial valley on the face of the Earth exists for one reason: CLIMATE CHANGE!!!
              For starters Doc, the insurance industry thinks that climate change is an issue, that is not even counting the numerous PhDs that believe that it's happening, never mind the melting glaciers or the shrinking ice caps or leftist publications like National Geographic. Ignoring the issue by carrying on with business as usual will not make it go away.

              Nine years ago, Ceres identified the colossal insurance industry as a key target for climate action. As the only NGO engaging with the industry on climate risk, we have mobilized leading insurance companies to move more aggressively on climate change. While key segments of the industry are making significant progress, it has not been at the pace and the scale needed – a conclusion made clear by the results of a new Ceres report benchmarking 330 insurance companies on their climate strategies.

              Insurance companies are on the front line of climate risks. A warming world means more extreme weather events, from floods to droughts to intense coastal storms. And that means bigger losses for property and casualty (P&C) insurers, which often pick up the tab for loss damages that businesses and homeowners incur.
              http://www.ceres.org/about-us/our-hi...climate-change



              Scholarly articles for insurance industry climate change


              Adaptation options in agriculture to climate change: a … - ‎Smit - Cited by 596

              … of insurance industry responses to climate change - ‎Mills - Cited by 81

              Insurance in a climate of change - ‎Mills - Cited by 273





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              Climate Risk Disclosure - NAIC



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              National Association of Insurance Commissioners




              Jun 13, 2016 - The white paper examined the effects of climate change on insurance industry investment decisions, disclosures and underwriting practices.


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              http://www.forbes.com/.../rift-widen...-industries-ov...








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              May 18, 2014 - Being a big business, the insurance industry is a strong backer of free ... some major carriers are staking claims in the climate change cause ...


              [PDF]Responding to Climate Change — The Insurance Industry ... - Evan Mills



              evanmills.lbl.gov/pubs/pdf/climate-action-insurance.pdf






              finance, the insurance industry is uniquely positioned to further society's understanding of climate change and advance creative solutions to minimise its impacts ...


              the insurance industry - on climate change - Ceres



              www.ceres.org › About Us › 25 Years of Impact








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              Nine years ago, Ceres identified the colossal insurance industry as a key target for climate action. As the only NGO engaging with the industry on climate risk, we ...


              Climate change & climate protection | Munich Re



              https://www.munichre.com/en/group/fo...nge/index.html





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              For more than 40 years, Munich Re has been dealing with climate change and the related risks and opportunities for the insurance industry. Our approach to ...


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              thinkprogress.org/climate/.../insurance-climate-change-disaster-relief/








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              Mar 23, 2016 - More and more companies are persuaded that climate change is real. ... Oddly — at least to anyone who's not close to the insurance industry ...
              https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...climate+change
              Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

              Initiated Chief Petty Officer
              Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Bass_Man86 View Post
                For starters Doc, the insurance industry thinks that climate change is an issue, that is not even counting the numerous PhDs that believe that it's happening, never mind the melting glaciers or the shrinking ice caps or leftist publications like National Geographic. Ignoring the issue by carrying on with business as usual will not make it go away.



                http://www.ceres.org/about-us/our-hi...climate-change





                https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...climate+change
                Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Bass_Man86 View Post
                  For starters Doc, the insurance industry thinks that climate change is an issue, that is not even counting the numerous PhDs that believe that it's happening, never mind the melting glaciers or the shrinking ice caps or leftist publications like National Geographic. Ignoring the issue by carrying on with business as usual will not make it go away.
                  ...

                  http://www.ceres.org/about-us/our-hi...climate-change
                  ...
                  https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...climate+change
                  A reminder that part of "the problem" is the frequent use of inaccurate language. Too few discussing this subject make the distinction of "Natural" climate change/flux, which is of geological record versus the debatable and yet to prove case of human caused/SIGNIFICANT influence upon climate change. This aside from the hubris of thinking human activity has a major influence on climatic cycles and whether such is a positive or negative influence.

                  Remember, if you aren't warming away from an "ice age" you are cooling towards one.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                  Present Current Events are the Future's History

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                    A reminder that part of "the problem" is the frequent use of inaccurate language. Too few discussing this subject make the distinction of "Natural" climate change/flux, which is of geological record versus the debatable and yet to prove case of human caused/SIGNIFICANT influence upon climate change. This aside from the hubris of thinking human activity has a major influence on climatic cycles and whether such is a positive or negative influence.

                    Remember, if you aren't warming away from an "ice age" you are cooling towards one.
                    Exactly!
                    Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Maobama's drivel was mindbogglingly ignorant...
                      “Rising temperatures could mean no more glaciers in Glacier national park, no more Joshua trees in Joshua Tree national park. Rising seas can destroy vital ecosystems in the Everglades and at some point could even threaten icons like the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island. That’s not the America I want to pass on to the next generation.”


                      Rising temperatures could mean no more glaciers in Glacier national park

                      Glacial mass balance has, on average, been decreasing since the mid-1800's. In other words, glaciers have generally been retreating over the past 150 years. Would it be better if the globally averaged glacial mass balance was increasing? That's a "big fat no."

                      Glacial mass balance was increasing from 2000 BC up until the mid 1800's.

                      It was decreasing from 8000 BC up until 2000 BC.

                      The glaciers at North Cascades National Park have stopped retreating...



                      Geologists understand that glacial mass balance is almost always positive or negative. While glacially slow, very few glaciers sit still. Geologists also know that most alpine/valley glaciers in North America are of very recent origin, only dating back to the Mid-Holocene Neoglaciation. Most reached their maximum extent in the 1800's during the Little Ice Age. The “small glaciers” of Glacier National Park, Montana may have not existed during the Holocene Climatic Optimum (HCO). The geological evidence suggests that they formed less than 7,000 years ago as the Earth’s climate began to cool after the HCO...

                      History of Glaciers in Glacier National Park


                      The history of glaciation within current Glacier National Park boundaries spans centuries of glacial growth and recession, carving the features we see today. Glaciers were present within current Glacier National Park boundaries as early as 7,000 years ago but may have survived an early Holocene warm period (Carrara, 1989), making them much older. These modest glaciers varied in size, tracking climatic changes, but did not grow to their Holocene maximum size until the end of the Little Ice Age (LIA) around A.D. 1850. While they may not have formed in their entirety during the LIA, their maximum perimeters can be documented through mapping of lateral and terminal moraines. (Key, 2002) The extent and mass of these glaciers, as well as glaciers around the globe, has clearly decreased during the 20th century in response to warmer temperatures.

                      Climate reconstructions representative of the Glacier National Park region extend back multiple centuries and show numerous long-duration drought and wet periods that influenced the mass balance of glaciers (Pederson et al. 2004). Of particular note was an 80-year period (~1770-1840) of cool, wet summers and above-average winter snowfall that led to a rapid growth of glaciers just prior to the end of the LIA. Thus, in the context of the entire Holocene, the size of glaciers at the end of the LIA was an anomaly of sorts. In fact, the large extent of ice coverage removed most of the evidence of earlier glacier positions by overriding terminal and lateral moraines.

                      [...]

                      USGS

                      “Mapping of lateral and terminal moraines” clearly demonstrates that the maximum extent of the glaciers was reached during the Little Ice Age (LIA).

                      Most of the alpine glaciers in Colorado formed after the HCO and reached their maximum extent during the LIA, between 400 and 150 years ago. Most have generally been retreating since the early 1900's...

                      [...]

                      [T]here have been three small Holocone (10,000 years BP to present) glacial advances termed, from oldest to youngest, Triple Lakes, Audubon, and Arapaho Peak advances. Collectively these minor advances are termed Neoglaciation, and the largest glacier during these advances was only 1.6 km long. The Arapaho Peak advance is local evidence for the Little Ice Age (the popular name for a period of cooling in the northern hemisphere lasting approximately from the 14th to the mid-19th centuries). Most of the glaciers and perennial ice patches in Colorado today are the tattered remnants of these small Little Ice Age glaciers.

                      [...]

                      Glaciers of Colorado

                      The glaciers of Mt Ranier National Park may date back to the last Pleistocene glaciation, but they also exhibit a similar variability to those of Glacier National Park and the Colorado Front Range…
                      The size of glaciers on Mount Rainier has fluctuated significantly in the past. For example, during the last ice age, from about 25,000 to about 15,000 years ago, glaciers covered most of the area now within the boundaries of Mount Rainier National Park and extended to the perimeter of the present Puget Sound Basin.

                      Geologists can determine the former extent of glaciers on Mount Rainier by mapping the outline of glacial deposits and by noting the position of trimlines, the distinct boundaries between older and younger forests or between forests and pioneering vegetation. Geologists determine the age of some of the deposits by noting the age of the oldest trees and lichens growing on them and the degree of weatherring on boulders. Between the 14th century and AD 1850, many of the glaciers on Mount Rainier advanced to their farthest went down-valley since the last ice age. Many advances of this sort occurred worldwide during this time period known to geologists as the Little Ice Age. During the Little Ice Age, the Nisqually Glacier advanced to a position 650 feet to 800 feet down-valley from the site of the Glacier Bridge, Tahoma and South Tahoma Glaciers merged at the base of Glacier Island, and the terminus of Emmons Glacier reached within 1.2 miles of the White River Campground.

                      Retreat of the Little Ice Age glaciers was slow until about 1920 when retreat became more rapid. Between the height of the Little Ice Age and 1950, Mount Rainier’s glaciers lost about one-quarter of their length. Beginning in 1950 and continuing through the early 1980′s, however, many of the major glaciers advanced in response to relatively cooler temperatures of the mid-century. The Carbon, Cowlitz, Emmons, and Nisqually Glaciers advanced during the late 1970′s and early 1980′s as a result of high snowfalls during the 1960′s and 1970′s. Since the early-1980′s and through 1992, however, many glaciers have been thinning and retreating and some advances have slowed, perhaps in response to drier conditions that have prevailed at Mount Rainier since 1977.

                      [...]

                      Mount Rainier National Park Information Page

                      The Mt. Ranier glaciers also seem to have reached their maximum Holocene extent during the Little Ice Age.

                      Most valley or alpine glaciers formed after the Holocene Climatic Optimum, during the Neoglaciation period (4,000 to 150 years ago) and reached their maxima during the mid-1800’s. Without the natural warming of the millennial climate cycle, those glaciers would have continued to advance. That would be a very bad thing.


                      No more Joshua trees in Joshua Tree national park


                      WTF???
                      Where Two Deserts Meet

                      Two distinct desert ecosystems, the Mojave and the Colorado, come together in Joshua Tree National Park. A fascinating variety of plants and animals make their homes in a land sculpted by strong winds and occasional torrents of rain. Dark night skies, a rich cultural history, and surreal geologic features add to the wonder of this vast wilderness in southern California.

                      National Park Service

                      It's a desert. Unless climate change is going to turn it into something other than a desert, it will remain a desert. Maybe the formerly respectable National Geographic can explain Maobama's moronic claim...
                      Climate Change Threatens an Iconic Desert Tree
                      It’s not just the polar bear. Animals and plants in Earth’s other extreme environment—the desert—are endangered by rising temperatures.


                      By Osha Gray Davidson, National Geographic

                      Close your eyes and imagine a species living in a harsh environment threatened by climate change. If you conjured up a polar bear, Cameron Barrows has a suggestion: Consider, instead, the Joshua tree—the gnarly icon of the Southwest’s Mojave Desert that looks like it sprang from a Dr. Seuss book.

                      “Animals living in the Arctic get a lot more attention than plants in arid lands, but desert plants like the Joshua tree are also threatened by a changing climate,” says Barrows, a research ecologist at the University of California, Riverside’s Center for Conservation Biology.

                      [...]

                      One study predicted under a scenario of changing climate that between 15 and 37 percent of Earth’s plants and animals will have populations so small by 2050 that extinction is virtually certain.

                      Other than the Arctic, deserts may have the most to lose as the planet warms because anything surviving there already lives on the edge.

                      Because plants and animals in ecosystems have complex relationships, it’s not just the Joshua tree at risk, says Kierán Suckling, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity, based in Tucson, Arizona.

                      [...]

                      Based on climate models using a 3-degree Celsius (5.4-degree Fahrenheit) increase, the range of Yucca brevifolia could be reduced up to 90 percent by the end of this century, Barrows says. Under that scenario, it would exist only in isolated pockets, called refugia, scattered across the 800,000-acre national park.

                      [...]

                      NotGeo

                      The Joshua trees are apparently threatened by a climate model which forecasts 3°C of warming by the end of this century. No scientifically realistic model forecasts anything remotely close to 3°C of warming by the end of this century. The only models forecasting that mush warming are based on Relative Concentration Pathway 8.5 (“The stuff nightmares are made from”).

                      Rising seas can destroy vital ecosystems in the Everglades and at some point could even threaten icons like the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island.

                      The average elevation of Everglades National Park is about 6' above sea level. No actual data indicate that sea level will rise by more than 1 foot by the end of this century. Claims of several feet of sea level rise are invariably based on RCP 8.5 - BAD SCIENCE FICTION.

                      Sea level rises and it falls... always has, always will. It was about 1-2 meters higher than it currently is about 4,000 years ago during the Holocene highstand. The Everglades moved to it's current location during the fall in sea level (which was related to the formation and advance of the Glacier National Park Glaciers). When sea level rises, the Everglades move up-slope and inland. When sea level falls, it moves down-slope ans seaward. Florida is dominated by Karst topography.

                      The idiotic comment about "icons like the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island" really doesn't deserve to be addressed... But, I will address it, because it's fun and easy. Unsurprisingly, the formerly respectable National Geographic has made similar moronic comments about the Statue of Liberty.



                      This is NOAA's record of sea level rise at The Battery in New York City...



                      Sea level near the Statue of Liberty has been rising at less than 3 mm/yr for as long as it's been measured. That's about 1" every 10 years.

                      The top of the Statue of Liberty's torch is 315' above sea level.

                      Here is NOAA's sea level trend projected to 2100 plotted at the same scale as the Statue of Liberty...

                      Attached Files
                      Last edited by The Doctor; 20 Jun 16, 09:45.
                      Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Gee...the Ayatollah went to Yosemite to rant about the climate again.

                        And Doc started another climate rant on this forum...again.

                        I'm starting to see an unhealthy connection.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Too fracking funny! Yosemite National Park has been ignoring Gorebal Warming...




                          Attached Files
                          Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What a hyprocrite! He shows up at Yosemite and screws up traffic for hours on Fathers Day just to preach about climate change. Yet...he leaves behind a huge carbon footprint in Yosemite from the 40 SUVs that were allowed on trails that normally do not allow vehicle traffic, only hikers. Why aren't the media reporting on this?





                            They flew in by helicopter on the first day, June 17.





                            Many of the people stuck in gridlock traffic for hours, wished he planned his visit during the week, when it is less of an inconvenience to others.
                            "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                            "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              You're expecting BHO to have consideration for the peons, er ... common citizens?
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
                              Present Current Events are the Future's History

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