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First trial of Eddy Grey police officer ends

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  • First trial of Eddy Grey police officer ends

    Remember the Eddy Grey incident in Baltimore? The first of six officers charged has been acquitted.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/off...Kz&ocid=SMSDHP

    Looks like the prosecution is beginning to unravel. But the witch hunt is still in progress...

    Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said in a statement that Nero will still face an administrative review by the police department.

  • #2
    One mistrial, one acquittal.

    Once again, much ado about what turns out to be not all that much.

    If that hate-filled prosecutor couldn't convince a Baltimore judge...and these first two cases were the strongest.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #3
      Quite frankly I think it's a travesty that the prosecution even made this far in the first place. It was obvious back in April 2015 that Marilyn Mosby was leading an unethical witch hunt to appease an angry mob.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ChrisF1987 View Post
        Quite frankly I think it's a travesty that the prosecution even made this far in the first place. It was obvious back in April 2015 that Marilyn Mosby was leading an unethical witch hunt to appease an angry mob.
        Agreed. And now it will come back on her. She put her reputation on the line, and the case has degenerated into a shambles.

        She went too aggressive in her charging as well. When you stack charges like she did, if the defense defeats the most feather-legged it can create a chain reaction that wipes out the entire stack.
        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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        • #5
          And a not-guilty verdict will really hurt a civil suit against the officer......while at the same time lending more credence to his own suit against the City and DA's Office for the witch hunt.
          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
            And a not-guilty verdict will really hurt a civil suit against the officer......while at the same time lending more credence to his own suit against the City and DA's Office for the witch hunt.
            The City settled with Gray's family quite some time ago, so I expect he has no worries there.

            With all the prejudicial remarks by the DA made when she was in the spotlight, I think you are very right about his chances with a suit. I hadn't considered that.

            Especially with a bench verdict. They can't argue a bamboozled jury.
            Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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            • #7
              And most especially since the suit will likely be filed at the same level of court in the same jurisdiction. Judges are normally pretty hesitant to countermand the orders of their peers so long as there's no question of law or procedure. Barring one of those, the bench verdict on the facts and evidence will be considered holy writ to a judge of the same jurisdiction and level.........her botched murder trial quite literally could have won him his defamation suit (among other charges he will bring to bear).
              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                And most especially since the suit will likely be filed at the same level of court in the same jurisdiction. Judges are normally pretty hesitant to countermand the orders of their peers so long as there's no question of law or procedure. Barring one of those, the bench verdict on the facts and evidence will be considered holy writ to a judge of the same jurisdiction and level.........her botched murder trial quite literally could have won him his defamation suit (among other charges he will bring to bear).
                Excellent points.

                If nothing else this will be putting a massive crimp in her career; neither political parties nor law firms are eager to recruit people who cannot deliver.
                Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                  Excellent points.

                  If nothing else this will be putting a massive crimp in her career; neither political parties nor law firms are eager to recruit people who cannot deliver.
                  Sadly I don't think she will be going away anytime soon, her husband is a Baltimore City Council member. The only way she'll leave office is if she quits, loses a primary, or gets in trouble for her actions.

                  As of January she had a 59% approval rating
                  http://www.wbal.com/article/137450/2...oice-for-mayor

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by ChrisF1987 View Post
                    Sadly I don't think she will be going away anytime soon, her husband is a Baltimore City Council member. The only way she'll leave office is if she quits, loses a primary, or gets in trouble for her actions.

                    As of January she had a 59% approval rating
                    http://www.wbal.com/article/137450/2...oice-for-mayor
                    Yeah, but I was figuring her grandstanding was the foundation for higher office, such as in the state or Fed AG service. Or the lucrative private sector.

                    With this case unraveling those ambitions, if that was her goal, are falling by the wayside.
                    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                      Yeah, but I was figuring her grandstanding was the foundation for higher office, such as in the state or Fed AG service. Or the lucrative private sector.

                      With this case unraveling those ambitions, if that was her goal, are falling by the wayside.
                      For sure...Especially how she was admonished by the trial judge for bringing the case...Prime case for malicious prosecution...

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                      • #12
                        Yep. I dunno if Maryland has it, but Malicious Prosecution is a criminal charge......I've seen prosecuting witnesses (people that take out warrants) held in contempt AND placed under judgement to pay their victim's (defendant's) legal fees and court costs.

                        Never seen it happen to a lawyer, but judicial contempt powers would allow for it. Wouldn't be the first time a lawyer spent the weekend in the slammer......though DA's rarely do time like that.
                        Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                          Yep. I dunno if Maryland has it, but Malicious Prosecution is a criminal charge......I've seen prosecuting witnesses (people that take out warrants) held in contempt AND placed under judgement to pay their victim's (defendant's) legal fees and court costs.

                          Never seen it happen to a lawyer, but judicial contempt powers would allow for it. Wouldn't be the first time a lawyer spent the weekend in the slammer......though DA's rarely do time like that.
                          I think you may be confusing Abuse of Process with Malicious Prosecution...MP has civil ramifications...(In Florida anyway)

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Darth Holliday View Post
                            I think you may be confusing Abuse of Process with Malicious Prosecution...MP has civil ramifications...(In Florida anyway)
                            Depends on your particular state and the laws in place.....though most states have some law (name and format varying) covering this sort of thing.
                            Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Darth Holliday View Post
                              For sure...Especially how she was admonished by the trial judge for bringing the case...Prime case for malicious prosecution...
                              In Texas IIRC that it called Abuse of Office. But I would have to check. Different titles, same offense.
                              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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