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The "fairness principle" explained

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  • The "fairness principle" explained

    Even a monkey can do it
    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    I've encountered similar with our three cats. If one gets something or more than the other two, I will be told off about it.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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    • #3
      Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
      I've encountered similar with our three cats. If one gets something or more than the other two, I will be told off about it.
      Mine are more practical - they'll just gang up on the one that got extra and steal it
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • #4
        Cute, kind of funny, and completely irrelevant to the argument when applied to humans and work.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
          Cute, kind of funny, and completely irrelevant to the argument when applied to humans and work.
          Why?
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
            Cute, kind of funny, and completely irrelevant to the argument when applied to humans and work.
            You expect relevance on the forums?
            Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
            Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by MarkV View Post
              Why?
              Because most work doesn't involve some simple task anyone can do.

              As a result, things like:

              Longevity
              Reliability
              Promotion potential
              Education
              Willingness to go beyond the basic skill / task set

              Not to mention things like interpersonal and political skills in dealing with others, etc.,

              Among other things determines what someone will pay for your work.

              For example, you have two workers at a company. One has been there 10 years and one has been there 10 months. Both can perform the job they are doing reliably and correctly. Should they receive equal pay?

              Or, how do you equate job A, with job B, with job C in terms of pay?

              You have four workers currently in similar positions. There is a promotion slot open. What criteria do you use to determine who should get that slot? What's "fair?"

              Like I said, the video is cute but irrelevant to the equal pay argument as applied to humans.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                You expect relevance on the forums?
                No...

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                  You expect relevance on the forums?
                  No, but some of us continue to hope. I figure if I'm here long enough, some of the members will eventually grow up.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                    For example, you have two workers at a company. One has been there 10 years and one has been there 10 months. Both can perform the job they are doing reliably and correctly. Should they receive equal pay?
                    Yes, nobody should get a pay rise for shining the ass of their trousers on a chair for 10 years.
                    If anyone should get paid more the person who is there 10 months should as they only took 10 months to get up to the level of someone who as there 10 years so shows more drive and intellect and so more promise for the future.

                    If you are 10 years working anywhere and someone else can walk in and get up to your level in 10 months you are crap at your job and should be ashamed of yourself.
                    "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
                    validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
                    "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
                      Yes, nobody should get a pay rise for shining the ass of their trousers on a chair for 10 years.
                      If anyone should get paid more the person who is there 10 months should as they only took 10 months to get up to the level of someone who as there 10 years so shows more drive and intellect and so more promise for the future.

                      If you are 10 years working anywhere and someone else can walk in and get up to your level in 10 months you are crap at your job and should be ashamed of yourself.
                      Oh, so someone who likes their job, the one they have, and is good at it and stays reliably working at it deserves no reward? Only those who strive for more, are greedy to rise to the top, deserve to be rewarded?
                      What if the person that was there 10 months quit a few later to go somewhere else for more pay and had to be replaced and the new worker took time and money to train?

                      Longevity has value to many employers and they are willing to pay for that quality in workers. If you don't consider longevity valuable as an employer you are likely to have a much higher turnover rate in employees and the resulting higher costs of training and lower productivity from them during their initial period of employment.

                      "Up or out" policies can often prove expensive. On the other hand, not having one can be a problem too. Balance is needed.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                        Even a monkey can do it
                        Then put one in the White House.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post

                          If you are 10 years working anywhere and someone else can walk in and get up to your level in 10 months you are crap at your job and should be ashamed of yourself.
                          Depends on the job and the standards of the company. How long does it take to become fully qualified as a fast food worker, a short order cook, or any other minimum wage job?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                            Then put one in the White House.
                            I would say something about one already being there, but that would be crass and just wrong...

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                            • #15
                              The parental leave policies are getting a bit out of hand IMO. Fairness? Why can't I get three months off? Just because I'm over 60 and have already raised kids doesn't mean I wouldn't like a few months off.
                              Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                              Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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