Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Columbine: In Remembrance

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Columbine: In Remembrance

    Today is a personal day for me. When I started teaching, the greatest love we showed for our kids was sacrificing so they could succeed, or making time for kids that no one would make time for. Today, the greatest love we show for our kids can be putting ourselves in harm's way. Conversely, it can also be the consequences of fighting administration when they want to send a kid to Siberia because 'maybe, well they could be, or they just creep me out and I think they might be a Columbine kid'. I didn't see as much of this back home, but its on the minds of Colorado educators and administrators. Nobody wants to be the Columbine school. Its been a game changer in the state that doesn't always make things better for our kids, especially the kids with disabilities who don't fit neatly into flowcharts and forced corporate style metrics.

    I try to spend some time in reflection throughout the year about the most effective ways I can help my students, doing my best to support them in being neither victims, nor offenders, but citizens. But I always take a moment to remember Dave Sanders on April 20th. On this one day, he was a heroic son of a bitch who ignored all the protocols we currently have in place to save his students' lives. That's the greatest love.

    http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news...the-lives-lost

  • #2


    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

    Comment


    • #3
      My missus and I went to French theaters for the G.V.Saint's "Elephant" when the movie was showed.
      What a damn' shock !
      It was an unforgettable personal experience.
      I wish the ending of these massacres for your country.
      But I am a great dreamer.
      Respect for the teacher.
      That rug really tied the room together

      Comment


      • #4
        Columbine is obviously a less sexy subject than the latest upgrading for an AR15 .
        The 500 drowned or supposed drowned yesterday in the Med,are surely also responsible for this silence,hehehe..
        That rug really tied the room together

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
          My missus and I went to French theaters for the G.V.Saint's "Elephant" when the movie was showed.
          What a damn' shock !
          It was an unforgettable personal experience.
          I wish the ending of these massacres for your country.
          But I am a great dreamer.
          Respect for the teacher.
          Thanks Seb! I'm a great dreamer too. I dream that one day all of our kids will feel safe in school. For me, that's the minimum bar. In a perfect, our kids would feel valued and respected for the individual experiences and perspectives they bring into the classroom.

          Comment


          • #6
            Nothing but respect for you and other teachers Biscuit, so please don't take this the wrong way! I sometimes wonder if in today's schools we are a bit too protective and all the measures we put into place to combat bullying and other school conflict might in the end contribute to the eventual day when some kid 'snaps' and brings a gun to school. What I mean is that when those of us who are over 40 went to school, we had our conflicts with bullies, we got into little shoving matches or wrestling matches, that type of thing, and we learned to handle these conflicts. I keep thinking that allowing some small amount of conflict among those smaller kids, the elementary age ones, might help teach them how to respond later when the conflicts are bigger.

            I'm not sure that I know what I'm talking about but it reminds me of the way a home-schooled kid, who is rarely exposed to the masses of other kids outside the home, might find that once they are exposed they are sick all the time because they never built up an immunity. It take those incidents of being sick to teach the body how to respond.

            I also understand that protecting kids is just about as instinctual as it gets but it must have been for the teachers of decades ago, too. Something changed, and the one thing that I can think of that makes some sense to me is that we started being overprotective and by shielding the little kids we took away some of their ability to handle things later. I don't remember anyone getting shot when I was a kid, and gun control was less restrictive then than it is now.

            Just my theories, not meaning to take away any of the sentiment from your post but searching for an answer!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Steve573 View Post
              Nothing but respect for you and other teachers Biscuit, so please don't take this the wrong way! I sometimes wonder if in today's schools we are a bit too protective and all the measures we put into place to combat bullying and other school conflict might in the end contribute to the eventual day when some kid 'snaps' and brings a gun to school. What I mean is that when those of us who are over 40 went to school, we had our conflicts with bullies, we got into little shoving matches or wrestling matches, that type of thing, and we learned to handle these conflicts. I keep thinking that allowing some small amount of conflict among those smaller kids, the elementary age ones, might help teach them how to respond later when the conflicts are bigger.
              I agree with this. But blame the lawyers and sue happy parents.

              I'm not sure that I know what I'm talking about but it reminds me of the way a home-schooled kid, who is rarely exposed to the masses of other kids outside the home, might find that once they are exposed they are sick all the time because they never built up an immunity. It take those incidents of being sick to teach the body how to respond.
              I've been both public schooled and homeschooled. Your belief that homeschooled kids are somehow sheltered from life is incorrect. They still interact with other kids and adults on a daily basis. They develop the same as other children. Homeschooled doesn't mean growing up in a bubble.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Steve573 View Post
                Nothing but respect for you and other teachers Biscuit, so please don't take this the wrong way! I sometimes wonder if in today's schools we are a bit too protective and all the measures we put into place to combat bullying and other school conflict might in the end contribute to the eventual day when some kid 'snaps' and brings a gun to school. What I mean is that when those of us who are over 40 went to school, we had our conflicts with bullies, we got into little shoving matches or wrestling matches, that type of thing, and we learned to handle these conflicts. I keep thinking that allowing some small amount of conflict among those smaller kids, the elementary age ones, might help teach them how to respond later when the conflicts are bigger.

                I'm not sure that I know what I'm talking about but it reminds me of the way a home-schooled kid, who is rarely exposed to the masses of other kids outside the home, might find that once they are exposed they are sick all the time because they never built up an immunity. It take those incidents of being sick to teach the body how to respond.

                I also understand that protecting kids is just about as instinctual as it gets but it must have been for the teachers of decades ago, too. Something changed, and the one thing that I can think of that makes some sense to me is that we started being overprotective and by shielding the little kids we took away some of their ability to handle things later. I don't remember anyone getting shot when I was a kid, and gun control was less restrictive then than it is now.

                Just my theories, not meaning to take away any of the sentiment from your post but searching for an answer!
                Thanks for the preface Steve. I think we're a little too quick to banish kids deemed potential threats. I don't get involved in the bullying as much, but I know the Facebook and the Snapchat have been game changers, as has the texting. Societal changes have been a game changer too. When I went to school kids had rifles in the back windows of their pick-up trucks. I never felt unsafe. All the sex has changed the dynamics in school too. Its happening more often with more kids, and with both sexes, and in more ways that some people would label deviant. It makes the drama factor blow a gasket some days. There's less discipline in schools these days. I've adopted a relational approach as opposed to 'black and white' rules. Nothing ruins things faster than writing a kid up, and they're back with no penalty before the period ends. The parental expectations are different - they see horrible things about their kiddo on social media, and are asking the school what we were doing since the posts often happen on campus.

                All of this is to say that Columbine wasn't the only game changer. No one wants to let things go too far without acting, and end up with a Columbine kid. And there's no escape with the voicemail, social media, etc. A lot of kids can't handle it, nor do they want to disengage from their phone because of the good things they see.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                  Thanks for the preface Steve. I think we're a little too quick to banish kids deemed potential threats. I don't get involved in the bullying as much, but I know the Facebook and the Snapchat have been game changers, as has the texting. Societal changes have been a game changer too. When I went to school kids had rifles in the back windows of their pick-up trucks. I never felt unsafe. All the sex has changed the dynamics in school too. Its happening more often with more kids, and with both sexes, and in more ways that some people would label deviant. It makes the drama factor blow a gasket some days. There's less discipline in schools these days. I've adopted a relational approach as opposed to 'black and white' rules. Nothing ruins things faster than writing a kid up, and they're back with no penalty before the period ends. The parental expectations are different - they see horrible things about their kiddo on social media, and are asking the school what we were doing since the posts often happen on campus.

                  All of this is to say that Columbine wasn't the only game changer. No one wants to let things go too far without acting, and end up with a Columbine kid. And there's no escape with the voicemail, social media, etc. A lot of kids can't handle it, nor do they want to disengage from their phone because of the good things they see.
                  A question relating to the recent bathroom murder of a teenage girl in Delaware is this:

                  Were teenage romances ever this crazy?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Naffenea View Post
                    I've been both public schooled and homeschooled. Your belief that homeschooled kids are somehow sheltered from life is incorrect. They still interact with other kids and adults on a daily basis. They develop the same as other children. Homeschooled doesn't mean growing up in a bubble.
                    Of course homeschooled kids CAN grow up properly socialized and perfectly normal. I am just concerned that some parents will (ab)use homeschooling to keep their kids isolated from the "wrong" people and indoctrinating them in their ways and thoughts without allowing the children to become self-responsible adults, just mental clones of themselves.

                    Parents generally mean well, very well, but good intentions alone without the necessary skills and experience can be actively harmful.
                    Reaction to the 2016 Munich shootings:
                    Europe: "We are shocked and support you in these harsh times, we stand by you."
                    USA: "We will check people from Germany extra-hard and it is your own damn fault for being so stupid."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Acheron View Post
                      Of course homeschooled kids CAN grow up properly socialized and perfectly normal. I am just concerned that some parents will (ab)use homeschooling to keep their kids isolated from the "wrong" people and indoctrinating them in their ways and thoughts without allowing the children to become self-responsible adults, just mental clones of themselves.

                      Parents generally mean well, very well, but good intentions alone without the necessary skills and experience can be actively harmful.
                      Maybe homeschooling does have it's advantages the parents at least are around their children more unlike in the case of Columbine where the parents of the perpetrators did not pay enough attention to their kids to where they had no idea about what they were doing and what kind of crap they were in to, IMHO this whole thing could have been prevented by proper parenting.
                      Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Teachers do not get the respect due them, the system has changed so much since the 1980s, my step son is a teacher, the kids pretty much run the show.
                        Colombine should have been a wake up call for a change in the way we discipline and bring order to our schools.
                        It does not mean corporal punishment, but behavioral expectations as well as academic goals. And most importantly a buy in with parents.
                        Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                        Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It is attitudes, not weapons.

                          WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) A fight in a high school restroom involving several female students ended with the death of a 16-year-old sophomore Thursday, authorities said.

                          The victim was a 10th-grader from New Castle who had gotten involved in a confrontation involving two other students at Wilmington's Howard High School of Technology, spokeswoman Kathy K. Demarest said in a statement. She said no weapons were involved. Police are questioning the other students, Demarest said.

                          The girl had been flown to A.I. DuPont Children's Hospital in critical condition, police spokeswoman Sgt. Andrea Janvier said.

                          Student Kayla Wilson said she was in a stall in the girl's restroom when the fight broke out.

                          "She was fighting a girl, and then that's when all these other girls started banking her like jumping her and she hit her head on the sink," Philadelphia TV station WPVI quoted Wilson as saying about the victim.

                          Neither Demarest nor police released the victim's name or would say how she died. Officers were first called to the school about 8:15 a.m. as students were arriving for the day, Demarest said.

                          Police Chief Bobby Cummings said Howard isn't known as a violent school, and he did not know of any other problems in recent days.

                          "My heart bleeds for the family," Mayor Dennis Williams told a news conference.

                          State agencies will help provide support for those affected by the tragedy, Gov. Jack Markell said in a statement.

                          http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/pol...Kj?form=PRHPTP
                          Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                          Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                            It is attitudes, not weapons.

                            WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) A fight in a high school restroom involving several female students ended with the death of a 16-year-old sophomore Thursday, authorities said.

                            The victim was a 10th-grader from New Castle who had gotten involved in a confrontation involving two other students at Wilmington's Howard High School of Technology, spokeswoman Kathy K. Demarest said in a statement. She said no weapons were involved. Police are questioning the other students, Demarest said.

                            The girl had been flown to A.I. DuPont Children's Hospital in critical condition, police spokeswoman Sgt. Andrea Janvier said.

                            Student Kayla Wilson said she was in a stall in the girl's restroom when the fight broke out.

                            "She was fighting a girl, and then that's when all these other girls started banking her like jumping her and she hit her head on the sink," Philadelphia TV station WPVI quoted Wilson as saying about the victim.

                            Neither Demarest nor police released the victim's name or would say how she died. Officers were first called to the school about 8:15 a.m. as students were arriving for the day, Demarest said.

                            Police Chief Bobby Cummings said Howard isn't known as a violent school, and he did not know of any other problems in recent days.

                            "My heart bleeds for the family," Mayor Dennis Williams told a news conference.

                            State agencies will help provide support for those affected by the tragedy, Gov. Jack Markell said in a statement.

                            http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/pol...Kj?form=PRHPTP
                            So stuff like Romeo and Juliet were fiction based on nonsense?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BKnight3 View Post
                              So stuff like Romeo and Juliet were fiction based on nonsense?
                              ? Did you not read the tragic news story of young girls beating another to death in a school restroom?
                              You think that is funny?
                              Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                              Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X