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Rule targets prosecutors who don't reveal innocence evidence

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  • Rule targets prosecutors who don't reveal innocence evidence

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) As four men sat in prison for a murder they didn't commit, records show that state investigators sent proof of their innocence to a North Carolina prosecutor, but he never revealed it to the convicted men.

    He didn't have to. Nothing in North Carolina's legal standards requires a prosecutor to turn over evidence of innocence after a conviction.

    The four, along with a fifth who also was convicted, were eventually cleared through the work of a commission that investigates innocence -- but not until they'd served years in prison, including several years when a judge says the prosecutor and sheriff "did nothing to follow up on" another man's confession.

    Some people now are calling for change.
    AP - Full Article

  • #2
    Hard to believe in a so-called "nation of law".

    Hard to believe it happened, and even harder to believe that we actually need a law to prevent justice from taking place.

    However, nothing was stopping the prosecutor from admitting the error and freeing the men - he deliberately chose not to, so he should be tried for obstruction of justice and sent to the same prison.

    There are, and always will be, higher moral imperatives than are specified by law.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      Long overdue.
      Human beings are the only creatures on Earth that claim a god and the only living thing that behaves like it hasn't got one - Hunter S. Thompson

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      • #4
        [QUOTE=Mountain Man;

        However, nothing was stopping the prosecutor from admitting the error and freeing the men - he deliberately chose not to, so he should be tried for obstruction of justice and sent to the same prison.[/QUOTE]

        Yep!
        Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          Hard to believe in a so-called "nation of law".

          Hard to believe it happened, and even harder to believe that we actually need a law to prevent justice from taking place.

          However, nothing was stopping the prosecutor from admitting the error and freeing the men - he deliberately chose not to, so he should be tried for obstruction of justice and sent to the same prison.

          There are, and always will be, higher moral imperatives than are specified by law.
          Easy to believe in a nation overrun with worthless liars... err... lawyers.

          When promotions and good performance reviews depend more on conviction rates than good jurisprudence and following the law you will get persecutors... err... prosecutors who will get convictions at all costs.

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