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Judge: Apple must help US hack San Bernardino killer's phone

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  • Judge: Apple must help US hack San Bernardino killer's phone

    WASHINGTON (AP) A U.S. magistrate ordered Apple Inc. on Tuesday to help the Obama administration hack into an encrypted iPhone belonging to one of the shooters in the December attack in San Bernardino, California, in a first-of-its-kind ruling that pits digital privacy against national security interests.

    The ruling by Magistrate Judge Sheri Pym, a former federal prosecutor, requires Apple to supply highly specialized software the FBI can load onto Syed Farook's work iPhone to bypass a self-destruct feature, which erases the phone's data after too many unsuccessful attempts to unlock it. The FBI wants to be able to try different combinations in rapid sequence until it finds the right one.
    AP - Full Article

  • #2
    Saw that. The only issue I have with this is that Apple should be paid for their time in doing it, rather than making this a freebee to the government. Anybody else would have to pay them, so the government should too.

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    • #3
      I agree with the judge on that. If your using a communication device to conspire to murder it should be fair game to the weal of all for its security to be defeated.
      Credo quia absurdum.


      Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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      • #4
        Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
        Saw that. The only issue I have with this is that Apple should be paid for their time in doing it, rather than making this a freebee to the government. Anybody else would have to pay them, so the government should too.
        The government is asking for the software to hack the phone, which should be not be required to be handed over. Whatever happened to the days of nice government requests for help in patriotic endeavors?
        Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

        Prayers.

        BoRG

        http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Salinator View Post
          The government is asking for the software to hack the phone, which should be not be required to be handed over. Whatever happened to the days of nice government requests for help in patriotic endeavors?
          I see this as a request made in wartime, even though we have an administration that denies we're at war. In that sense, I nothing wrong with the request, but I also think the government should pay Apple full market value for their assistance.

          I doubt that last is part of this request / demand.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
            I see this as a request made in wartime, even though we have an administration that denies we're at war. In that sense, I nothing wrong with the request, but I also think the government should pay Apple full market value for their assistance.

            I doubt that last is part of this request / demand.
            There is a major difference between demanding the software to break a code and asking someone to help break a code. Apple would probably not give a **** about spending money to hack the phone, but they most likely will not appreciate a government demand to hand over intellectual property. Why are supporting this government grab?
            Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

            Prayers.

            BoRG

            http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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            • #7
              Reading the article carefully, I see what the government is doing here (well, the Obama administration).

              The judge does want the government to pay Apple for their help apparently, that's good.

              What's bad is the Obama administration went to court over this rather than ask Apple to set a precedent that they can then use in the future for other similar situations, particularly ones that are less obvious, in order to get government control over encryption software. That is demagoguery on the part of the administration, but I would say, expected of it.

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              • #8
                A lot of cell phone companies, including Apple, are very difficult to work with from the LEO side. They've even started refusing to provide information in response to subpoenas or search warrants. Even with a search warrant, you haven't been able to get the phone companies to assist in cracking phones to retrieve often important evidence.

                It's something that needs to be tread lightly, lest the pendulum swing too far the other way, but this precedent has the potential to do a lot of good, by compelling the companies to respond to valid Search Warrants.
                Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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                • #9
                  In south africa they just ask. Cell companies cant say no.
                  you think you a real "bleep" solders you "bleep" plastic solders don't wory i will make you in to real "bleep" solders!! "bleep" plastic solders

                  CPO Mzinyati

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                    Saw that. The only issue I have with this is that Apple should be paid for their time in doing it, rather than making this a freebee to the government. Anybody else would have to pay them, so the government should too.
                    Concur; actually they do not have to release any proprietary information to the Feds, they could simply unlock the phone.
                    Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

                    Initiated Chief Petty Officer
                    Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

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                    • #11
                      Included in the news today is the information that Apple has gone to court to fight the request.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                        The government is asking for the software to hack the phone, which should be not be required to be handed over. Whatever happened to the days of nice government requests for help in patriotic endeavors?
                        Its called chain of custody, and its as old as the USA.

                        In a criminal investigation every piece of evidence has to be in official control every step of the way. To include the people extracting the data.

                        Apple deliberately designed their latest phones to foil police extraction software used in conjunction with a search warrant.

                        Apple has basically taken the stand that they are above the law, and that court orders do not apply to them or their products.
                        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                          Its called chain of custody, and its as old as the USA.

                          In a criminal investigation every piece of evidence has to be in official control every step of the way. To include the people extracting the data.

                          Apple deliberately designed their latest phones to foil police extraction software used in conjunction with a search warrant.

                          Apple has basically taken the stand that they are above the law, and that court orders do not apply to them or their products.
                          Or...could it possibly be that customers are looking for phones that the government cannot break into any time they feel like it, and Apple sees this as a strong selling point? Computer encryption is equally popular these days for the same reasons.

                          Instead of casting Apple as the villain, should we be looking at our own, over-controlling, Orwellian government as the real culprit here?
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                          • #14
                            Has the US Government officially declared war on terrorism or not? If so, I think that this 'request' for Apple to unlock a phone to provide information about the 'enemy' should be viewed as a civic responsibility on Apple's part.


                            ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
                            IN MARE IN COELO

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                            • #15
                              Look it up and get back to us: can you find a formal declaration of war anywhere issued by Congress? Last time I checked, the one person helping terrorists the most anywhere in the world was our own president.

                              Meanwhile, why hasn't anybody questioned why the NSA is unable to handle such a simple matter as hacking into an Apple phone?
                              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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