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  • Is Cruz throwing in the towel?

    Now there's this from Cruz...

    Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz on Tuesday suggested the GOP establishment making a concerted effort to side with rival Donald Trump over him in the presidential race.

    “The establishment is beginning to support Donald Trump,” Cruz told BuzzFeed News, adding that Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad — who on Tuesday urged voters not to vote for Cruz — was part of the same "cronyism" establishment as Trump.
    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/politi...Kz&ocid=SMSDHP

  • #2
    Isn't Cruz part of the Republican establishment? Wasn't he a member of Bush's election campaign team and then awarded a position as associate deputy attorney general in the US Justice Department along with a position in the FTC?

    Comment


    • #3
      yea, yea Sko...blame it on Bush.

      I do!!
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Skoblin View Post
        Isn't Cruz part of the Republican establishment? Wasn't he a member of Bush's election campaign team and then awarded a position as associate deputy attorney general in the US Justice Department along with a position in the FTC?
        Cruz is not part of the "establishment."
        In short, the real "Establishment" and "Outsider," "anti-Establishment" or "Tea Party" factions are not about who is conservative or moderate, or who is inside or outside the Beltway or public office, or who has fancy degrees or a large readership/listenership or attends the right cocktail parties or churches, or even necessarily who has or has not supported various candidates. The term "Establishment" is used and abused in those contexts, but invariably describes only a division of passing significance. The real battle between the Establishment and the Outsiders is between those who urge significant changes in our spending patterns as a necessity to preserve the America we have known, and those who are unwilling to take that step. It is, in short, between those who are, and those who are not, willing to take action in the belief that the currently established structure of how public money is spent is unsustainable and must be fixed while it still can if we are not to lose by encroachments the all the other things Republicans and conservatives stand for.

        http://www.redstate.com/2012/01/17/w...-really-means/

        Cruz is not an outsider like Trump. However, he is not part of the establishment and hasn't been part of it since he defeated the establishment candidate, Lt. Governor David Dewhurst, in the Texas GOP primary for US Senate candidate.

        Marco Rubio started out as an anti-establishment Senate candidate; but has gradually aligned himself with the establishment on several key issues. Jeb Bush is a classic establishment candidate.

        Cruz was a domestic policy and legal adviser for the Bush campaign. His primary contributions came after Bush won the election during the legal brawl in Florida.

        Cruz wasn't "awarded" anything. He was hired for those two positions because he played a key role in the Bush legal team's success in preventing Gore from stealing the election and he had a very impressive CV...
        Cruz graduated cum laude from Princeton University with a Bachelor of Arts in Public Policy[33] from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs in 1992.[3][34] While at Princeton, he competed for the American Whig-Cliosophic Society's Debate Panel and won the top speaker award at both the 1992 U.S. National Debating Championship and the 1992 North American Debating Championship.[35] In 1992, he was named U.S. National Speaker of the Year, and with his debate partner David Panton won Team of the Year.[35] Cruz and Panton would later represent Harvard Law School at the 1995 World Debating Championship, losing in the semi-finals to a team from Australia.[36][37][38] Princeton's debate team named their annual novice championship after Cruz.[38]

        Cruz's senior thesis at Princeton investigated the separation of powers; its title, Clipping the Wings of Angels, draws its inspiration from a passage attributed to US President James Madison: "If angels were to govern men, neither external nor internal controls on government would be necessary." Cruz argued that the drafters of the Constitution intended to protect the rights of their constituents, and that the last two items in the Bill of Rights offer an explicit stop against an all-powerful state.[22][39]

        After graduating from Princeton, Cruz attended Harvard Law School, graduating magna cum laude in 1995 with a Juris Doctor degree.[3][40] While at Harvard Law, he was a primary editor of the Harvard Law Review, and executive editor of the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy, and a founding editor of the Harvard Latino Law Review.[34] Referring to Cruz's time as a student at Harvard Law, Professor Alan Dershowitz said, "Cruz was off-the-charts brilliant".[41][42][43][44] At Harvard Law, Cruz was a John M. Olin Fellow in Law and Economics.[45]

        Cruz currently serves on the Board of Advisors of the Texas Review of Law and Politics.[46]

        [...]

        Cruz served as a law clerk to J. Michael Luttig of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit in 1995[45][47] and William Rehnquist, Chief Justice of the United States in 1996.[3] Cruz was the first Hispanic to clerk for a Chief Justice of the United States.[48]

        Private practice

        After Cruz finished his clerkships, he took a position with Cooper, Carvin & Rosenthal, now known as Cooper & Kirk, LLC, from 1997 to 1998.[49] While with the firm, Cruz worked on matters relating to the National Rifle Association, and helped prepare testimony for the impeachment proceedings against President Clinton.[50] Cruz also served as private counsel for Congressman John Boehner during Boehner's lawsuit against Congressman Jim McDermott for releasing a tape recording of a Boehner telephone conversation.[51]

        [...]

        https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Cruz

        After his brief stint with the Bush administration, Cruz was selected by Texas AG (now Governor) Greg Abbott to be Texas Solicitor General...
        Cruz has authored 70 United States Supreme Court briefs and presented 43 oral arguments, including nine before the United States Supreme Court.[41][47][54] Cruz's record of having argued before the Supreme Court nine times is more than any practicing lawyer in Texas or any current member of Congress.[55] Cruz has commented on his nine cases in front of the U.S. Supreme Court: "We ended up year after year arguing some of the biggest cases in the country. There was a degree of serendipity in that, but there was also a concerted effort to seek out and lead conservative fights."[55]

        Regarding the subject of this thread...
        What’s Driving the Establishment’s Preference for Trump over Cruz?

        by DAVID FRENCH January 18, 2016 3:00 PM @DAVIDAFRENCH Two weeks ago, I assumed that — as candidates such as Jeb Bush, Chris Christie, and John Kasich floundered — the GOP establishment would migrate to Marco Rubio and then Ted Cruz before coalescing around Donald Trump if and only if he emerged as the inevitable nominee.

        I may be wrong. Simply put, I keep underestimating establishment distaste for Cruz. In conversations with establishment figures I respect — people who love this country and have nothing substantial to lose from either a Trump or Cruz presidency — I’m detecting a preference for Trump.

        [...]

        Read more at: http://www.nationalreview.com/articl...-prefers-trump

        The GOP establishment may not like Trump; however they are terrified of Cruz. Trump has probably never read the US Constitution. Cruz is hell-bent on locking the Federal government back into the constitutional box envisioned by its primary author, James Madison.

        The Father of the Constitution is anathema to both parties' establishments.
        Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
          Cruz is hell-bent on locking the Federal government back into the constitutional box envisioned by its primary author, James Madison.
          For the benefit of foreign readers like myself who are unfamiliar with the US constitution, please elaborate on what this 'constitutional box' is and how you think Cruz will try to establish it.
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          • #6
            Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
            The GOP establishment may not like Trump; however they are terrified of Cruz. Trump has probably never read the US Constitution. Cruz is hell-bent on locking the Federal government back into the constitutional box envisioned by its primary author, James Madison.
            "Terrified" of Cruz? Do you actually believe this malarkey? Anybody running for either of the two established parties is part of the establishment in one sense or another. His wife works for Goldman Sachs and he obtained a loan from Goldman Sachs to fund his first senate bid. Not part of the establishment? Ha Ha Ha. The only thing they are terrified about is that he may be too closely connected with the religious right to get elected. If elected, he'll be like all the other establishment candidates trying to act anti-establishment, ergo, lots of rhetoric and nothing more. As for locking the federal government back into its constitutional box as envisioned James Madison - ridiculous. That ship sailed long ago, and anything he tries to get passed through Congress will either be watered down so much as to be unrecognizable or will contain so many loopholes and concessions as to be meaningless. It amazes me that people still expect fundamental change from candidates running for the two dominant political parties which obtain direct benefit leaving the system exactly as it is.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
              Classic strategy :

              1) He is telling the potential Trump voters : Trump is the darling of the establishment,thus : do not do as that Sarah the grizzly killer who supports DT .


              2 ) He is covering his behind for the moment he will lose the nomination :those of the establishment have abandonned me .

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by ljadw View Post
                Classic strategy :
                1) He is telling the potential Trump voters : Trump is the darling of the establishment,thus : do not do as that Sarah the grizzly killer who supports DT .
                2 ) He is covering his behind for the moment he will lose the nomination :those of the establishment have abandonned me .
                It's all rhetoric. The two establishment parties are based on rhetoric and big money. So are all their candidates. Rhetoric is aimed at whipping up populist support. Big money is aimed at preventing populist support endangering the system. Big money wins.

                Comment


                • #9
                  No, Sen Cruz is not 'throwing in the towel'. His road to the nomination has always run though the 'SEC' primaries that hit after the first four early contest. His jump in Iowa has tweaked that a bit, but not by much.

                  Yes, he's part of the establishment. He's on the outer fringe but is still in it.
                  “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                  “To talk of many things:
                  Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                  Of cabbages—and kings—
                  And why the sea is boiling hot—
                  And whether pigs have wings.”
                  ― Lewis Carroll

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
                    For the benefit of foreign readers like myself who are unfamiliar with the US constitution, please elaborate on what this 'constitutional box' is and how you think Cruz will try to establish it.
                    The "how" will be difficult, even if Cruz wins and the GOP maintains control of both houses of Congress.

                    The "what" was explained in great detail in James Madison's contributions to the Federalist Papers and in his very.concise veto of a massive public works bill.

                    Grover Cleveland was probably the last US President to follow the Constitution in a manner consistent with its primary author, James Madison, and as intended by the framers of the our Federal government...
                    The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce; with which last the power of taxation will, for the most part, be connected. The powers reserved to the several States will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, liberties, and properties of the people, and the internal order, improvement, and prosperity of the State.

                    The operations of the federal government will be most extensive and important in times of war and danger; those of the State governments, in times of peace and security. As the former periods will probably bear a small proportion to the latter, the State governments will here enjoy another advantage over the federal government. The more adequate, indeed, the federal powers may be rendered to the national defense, the less frequent will be those scenes of danger which might favor their ascendancy over the governments of the particular States.

                    --James Madison, Federalist #45

                    Federalist #45 is just one example.

                    Madison's 1817 veto of a public works bill ...
                    I am not unaware of the great importance of roads and canals and the improved navigation of water courses, and that a power in the National Legislature to provide for them might be exercised with signal advantage to the general prosperity. But seeing that such a power is not expressly given by the Constitution, and believing that it can not be deduced from any part of it without an inadmissible latitude of construction and reliance on insufficient precedents; believing also that the permanent success of the Constitution depends on a definite partition of powers between the General and the State Governments, and that no adequate landmarks would be left by the constructive extension of the powers of Congress as proposed in the bill, I have no option but to withhold my signature from it, and to cherishing the hope that its beneficial objects may be attained by a resort for the necessary powers to the same wisdom and virtue in the nation which established the Constitution in its actual form and providently marked out in the instrument itself a safe and practicable mode of improving it as experience might suggest.
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Skoblin View Post
                      "Terrified" of Cruz? Do you actually believe this malarkey? Anybody running for either of the two established parties is part of the establishment in one sense or another. His wife works for Goldman Sachs and he obtained a loan from Goldman Sachs to fund his first senate bid. Not part of the establishment? Ha Ha Ha. The only thing they are terrified about is that he may be too closely connected with the religious right to get elected. If elected, he'll be like all the other establishment candidates trying to act anti-establishment, ergo, lots of rhetoric and nothing more. As for locking the federal government back into its constitutional box as envisioned James Madison - ridiculous. That ship sailed long ago, and anything he tries to get passed through Congress will either be watered down so much as to be unrecognizable or will contain so many loopholes and concessions as to be meaningless. It amazes me that people still expect fundamental change from candidates running for the two dominant political parties which obtain direct benefit leaving the system exactly as it is.
                      Are Republicans So Afraid of Ted Cruz That They’ll Let Donald Trump Win?
                      Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
                        No, Sen Cruz is not 'throwing in the towel'. His road to the nomination has always run though the 'SEC' primaries that hit after the first four early contest. His jump in Iowa has tweaked that a bit, but not by much.

                        Yes, he's part of the establishment. He's on the outer fringe but is still in it.
                        An "establishment" doesn’t have a fringe...
                        2: an established order of society: as
                        a often capitalized : a group of social, economic, and political leaders who form a ruling class (as of a nation)
                        b often capitalized : a controlling group <the literary establishment>
                        http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/establishment
                        Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                          An "establishment" doesn’t have a fringe...
                          2: an established order of society: as
                          a often capitalized : a group of social, economic, and political leaders who form a ruling class (as of a nation)
                          b often capitalized : a controlling group <the literary establishment>
                          http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/establishment
                          For a literalist, in reality yes, it does. Sen Cruz, if he'd had no Presidential ambitions, would have been the Conservative version of Sen McCain, the conservative 'Marvick'. However Sen Cruz came to the Sen with the plan to run for President in 2016 and he mapped his anti-establishment Senate actions toward that goal, nothing more.
                          “The time has come,” the Walrus said,
                          “To talk of many things:
                          Of shoes—and ships—and sealing-wax—
                          Of cabbages—and kings—
                          And why the sea is boiling hot—
                          And whether pigs have wings.”
                          ― Lewis Carroll

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Did you even read the article?
                            First, it makes the following summarizations of Trump and Rubio:
                            Rubio is God’s gift to the Republican donor class [i.e. moneyed establishment], and Trump is its nightmare.
                            Then, it states that fundamentally there is no difference between Rubio and Cruz
                            Cruz, unlike Trump, is a full-fledged member of the conservative movement. You cannot have a more certain loyalist; he was literally raised from birth to enact the conservative agenda. What’s more, Cruz’s reputation for extremism is overstated. As Eliana Johnson shows in a wonderful joint profile, Cruz and Rubio are more or less the same politician. They have pursued divergent strategies with the same end goal. Rubio is building a persona optimized for a general election, while Cruz is building a persona optimized for a primary.
                            In other words, the problem with Cruz, is that he may have no cachet outside of the Republican primaries. In other words, that he may be unelectable in an actual presidential race - just like I said. And - like I stated - he's all rhetoric and hot air.
                            For that reason, Cruz would stand a somewhat weaker chance of winning than Rubio, but the difference is really marginal. Cruz would not be the Establishment’s first or second choice to run atop its ticket, but he’s far from the disaster Trump would pose. He’s substantively a garden-variety right-winger. Cruz is the candidate who can harness cultural alienation, populist distrust of elites, and anti-immigration sentiment into safe channels — safe meaning something that could result in something less than the meltdown that would be a Trump nomination
                            .

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
                              For a literalist, in reality yes, it does. Sen Cruz, if he'd had no Presidential ambitions, would have been the Conservative version of Sen McCain, the conservative 'Marvick'. However Sen Cruz came to the Sen with the plan to run for President in 2016 and he mapped his anti-establishment Senate actions toward that goal, nothing more.
                              McCain is textbook GOP establishment. The "Maverick" only bucked against anti-Establishment Republicans who were to his right. He is politically indistinguishable from Mitch McConnell.
                              Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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