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Afflunza kid back in trouble.

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  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    I'm one of those people covered by a bond. It's saved me quite a bit of money. I'm still responsible for the damage that I cause or get. I'm a slow paranoid driver because of that...

    There's a shite load of deer that want to leap into my windshield out here... So I go low and slow.

    I insured my kid because kids are stupid. They just make bad decisions because they don't have the experience to make good ones...

    But back to the subject a 15 year old with access to booze and driving while drunk is not good parenting. If I was on a jury I'd hit the parents with the maximum penalties that I could get...

    That kid killed four people.
    To be able to charge the parents the prosecutor would have to establish that they provided him with the alcohol without supervision on the night in question, which was not the case in this situation.

    As far as the car, he was a legal driver. No issues there.

    Bad parents, yes. Criminally liable, no.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bwaha
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    There's no neglect. The kid had a class C license. He doesn't have to own the car to drive it, so long as he is covered by insurance or bond.

    As to legal fees, they won the case when they barred the motion to try him as an adult. Texas' juvie courts are very weak.
    I'm one of those people covered by a bond. It's saved me quite a bit of money. I'm still responsible for the damage that I cause or get. I'm a slow paranoid driver because of that...

    There's a shite load of deer that want to leap into my windshield out here... So I go low and slow.

    I insured my kid because kids are stupid. They just make bad decisions because they don't have the experience to make good ones...

    But back to the subject a 15 year old with access to booze and driving while drunk is not good parenting. If I was on a jury I'd hit the parents with the maximum penalties that I could get...

    That kid killed four people.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    It's like that here also.
    My question is, what is a adult crime? I'm 65 years old, I have never committed murder or rape or drug violations. Apparently I'm a juvenile.
    I see a 15 year old kid commit a murder and the argument is he committed an adult crime he should be charged as an adult.
    So what is a juvenile crime? Do crimes indicate maturity?
    I think it's simple, you are either 18 or your ain't.
    But that's just me, I get it that a juvenile would be released earlier, maybe that needs to change.
    Actually in Texas its 17.

    Generally it has to do with the severity of the crime. A prime example that comes to mind is the 15 year old that beat his infant half-sister to death with a hammer. The idea is that sort of kid could not be effectively and safely contained within a juvie facility.

    Repeat offenders for heavy felonies work likewise.

    You've got a growing number of highly violent teens who are seriously challenging the system.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
    Why haven't the vampires, err Lawyers sucked every dollar out of the parents? If I was a ambulance chaser I'd be all over this case...

    A minor drunk driving a car bought by his parents...

    Why the parents weren't charged with neglect is a mystery to me as well...
    There's no neglect. The kid had a class C license. He doesn't have to own the car to drive it, so long as he is covered by insurance or bond.

    As to legal fees, they won the case when they barred the motion to try him as an adult. Texas' juvie courts are very weak.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bwaha
    replied
    Why haven't the vampires, err Lawyers sucked every dollar out of the parents? If I was a ambulance chaser I'd be all over this case...

    A minor drunk driving a car bought by his parents...

    Why the parents weren't charged with neglect is a mystery to me as well...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    The last time I checked, the all volunteer military services were not taking anyone with criminal records.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
    But do the military need punks? They might do a very good job of straightening him out but it isn't what their primary job is.
    That's alway been the question, I knew kids that were getting into trouble back in the 60s when I went to high school, the judge gave them the choice of jail or the army and they went into the army, saved their lives. Never offended again, but then, these were not gang members dealing drugs and killing anyone, they were stealing cars or some non violent crime.

    Leave a comment:


  • Urban hermit
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    In Texas the prosecutor can apply via a pre-trial hearing to try a juvie as an adult, but its up to a judge.

    In Texas the burden is to show that the nature and severity of the subject's actions are such that it warrants such treatment.
    It's like that here also.
    My question is, what is a adult crime? I'm 65 years old, I have never committed murder or rape or drug violations. Apparently I'm a juvenile.
    I see a 15 year old kid commit a murder and the argument is he committed an adult crime he should be charged as an adult.
    So what is a juvenile crime? Do crimes indicate maturity?
    I think it's simple, you are either 18 or your ain't.
    But that's just me, I get it that a juvenile would be released earlier, maybe that needs to change.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    In Texas the prosecutor can apply via a pre-trial hearing to try a juvie as an adult, but its up to a judge.

    In Texas the burden is to show that the nature and severity of the subject's actions are such that it warrants such treatment.
    So in Texas, someone charged with multiple counts of vehicular assault is not considered an adult regardless of age?

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    You bring up a good point. Why do some "kids" get tried as adults and others as juveniles ?
    It should not be up to the prosecutor, you are either under 18 or you aren't.
    What this punk needs is three years in the military.
    In Texas the prosecutor can apply via a pre-trial hearing to try a juvie as an adult, but its up to a judge.

    In Texas the burden is to show that the nature and severity of the subject's actions are such that it warrants such treatment.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    You bring up a good point. Why do some "kids" get tried as adults and others as juveniles ?
    It should not be up to the prosecutor, you are either under 18 or you aren't.
    What this punk needs is three years in the military.
    But do the military need punks? They might do a very good job of straightening him out but it isn't what their primary job is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trung Si
    replied
    Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
    Two words, lawyers being one. The other is "money" and lots of it in this case.
    Absolutely!

    Leave a comment:


  • R. Evans
    replied
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    One word - "lawyers".
    Two words, lawyers being one. The other is "money" and lots of it in this case.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
    You bring up a good point. Why do some "kids" get tried as adults and others as juveniles ?
    It should not be up to the prosecutor, you are either under 18 or you aren't.
    What this punk needs is three years in the military.
    One word - "lawyers".

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Wait until its done. Even though he's 19, since he was convicted under the juvie system, he is subject to the juvie system for parole/probation violations until he is 21.

    And despite our great system for dealing with adults, Texas' juvie system is a joke.

    The real victory his lawyers pulled off was blocking the prosecution's efforts to try him as an adult.

    The real hope is that he'll get caught on a new charge, since then he'll be tried as an adult.
    He already has a "new charge". He is now a fugitive from justice wanted for failure to appear in court. And if he has fled the state...

    Leave a comment:

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