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Restaurant Defends Autistic Employee - Terminates Patron!

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  • Restaurant Defends Autistic Employee - Terminates Patron!

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska An Alaska restaurant is being overwhelmed with goodwill after its owner defended an autistic delivery driver who was berated by a customer.
    The customer called Little Italy Restaurante in Anchorage to loudly complain after the delivery employee mixed up an order, claiming the driver was using drugs. Owner P.J. Gialopsos' daughter answered the phone, and assured the customer the driver wasn't impaired and was instead autistic and has a speech impediment.
    Gialopsos told the Alaska Dispatch News it wasn't the first time there's been complaints. But once they explain the driver has a disability, customers usually understand.
    The driver returned to the restaurant upset after the encounter. It was at that point Gialopsos decided to terminate the relationship -- with the customer. She instructed her staff to never again take an order from that person
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2015/11/15...livery-driver/
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    The customer was obviously a jerk, and the owner should be commended for defending his disabled employee.

    Having said that, if the employee is consistently making such errors, perhaps they could change his job description so that he would not be subject to such abuse in the future.

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    • #3
      They probably will, but I'm guessing that this is a relatively small community in which the members know and understand the problem, like the delivery boy for the drugstore who's mentally retarded. Most people go with the flow and appreciate that the guy has a job and an understanding employer.

      I've been sefved at various times by people with Downs Syndrome, and I would never occur to me to complain about their service - just go back up to the counter and say "I forgot to ask for..." and the problem is solved without humiliating someone whose life is tough enough as it is.

      In this case, it was only pizza, for crying out loud.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

      Comment


      • #4
        If we want to live in a world where people who are impaired in various ways do something other than sit around costing their families & taxpayers money then we need to have the ability to tolerate imperfection once in a while.

        Good on this place for giving this guy a job & sticking with him despite occasional mistakes. A few weeks ago we had the Melbourne Cup, one of the premier horse races in the world. The winning jockey was, for the first time, a woman. The horse's strapper was her older brother, who happens to have downs syndrome. Apparently he is one of the hardest workers in the stable - often first in & last out.

        In a previous era he would have been denied such opportunities, as would she (the majority of owners didn't want her to ride the race, but the trainer stuck by her).

        Human beings are the only creatures on Earth that claim a god and the only living thing that behaves like it hasn't got one - Hunter S. Thompson

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        • #5
          I grew up in a small town where a local restaurant hired the mentally handicapped. One of these employees once served me with his thumb place squarely in the middle of my potatos and gravy. I simply ignored it but it made an impression on me apparently as the memory is vivid. I'm fairly ashamed to admit it may have had an effect on me patronising that restaurant. I'm a bit OCD about germs and bugs. In hindsight I believe I should have mentioned it to the owner as I'm sure it was a correctable problem.
          We hunt the hunters

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          • #6
            My mother is in an assisted living home for severe dementia. The home has a lovely, lovely young woman as a volunteer (she has a title, Assistant Activity Director, and proudly wears a badge that states her status). This young woman has Downs Syndrome. She is in her mid-twenties. She is so wonderful with the old folks and so patient and so huggy with them. She runs some of the games that they can play and helps serve meals, etc. The residents love her, the staff loves her and I love her. I think every home for the elderly needs folks like that as helpers, paid or unpaid. I would get very upset if I ever saw someone abuse her because of her condition. She is a wonderful person.
            Homo homini lupus

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jannie View Post
              My mother is in an assisted living home for severe dementia. The home has a lovely, lovely young woman as a volunteer (she has a title, Assistant Activity Director, and proudly wears a badge that states her status). This young woman has Downs Syndrome. She is in her mid-twenties. She is so wonderful with the old folks and so patient and so huggy with them. She runs some of the games that they can play and helps serve meals, etc. The residents love her, the staff loves her and I love her. I think every home for the elderly needs folks like that as helpers, paid or unpaid. I would get very upset if I ever saw someone abuse her because of her condition. She is a wonderful person.
              As with all people we shouldn't underestimate their abilities in the interest of "kindness". Everyone needs to be challenged and while the sentiments here are heart warming these relationships require a certain amount of "tough love". There is a temptation to think of the mentally handicap as children but they become adults like everyone else and the analogy is weak. As with any adult you should interact with them with realistic expectations but the worst thing you can do to anyone is have low expectations.
              We hunt the hunters

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BF69 View Post
                If we want to live in a world where people who are impaired in various ways do something other than sit around costing their families & taxpayers money then we need to have the ability to tolerate imperfection once in a while.

                Good on this place for giving this guy a job & sticking with him despite occasional mistakes. A few weeks ago we had the Melbourne Cup, one of the premier horse races in the world. The winning jockey was, for the first time, a woman. The horse's strapper was her older brother, who happens to have downs syndrome. Apparently he is one of the hardest workers in the stable - often first in & last out.

                In a previous era he would have been denied such opportunities, as would she (the majority of owners didn't want her to ride the race, but the trainer stuck by her).

                I must say, for once, I wholly agree. Really good to see such an enlightened response to protect someone who has likely had a tough life already with all sorts of challenges and has probably performed to heroic portions to get a job in the first place.
                Ne Obliviscaris, Sans Peur

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