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School has sure changed! Not for the better..

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  • #46
    I agree there. The average teacher has little background in math or science (or anything technical for that matter). Worse, in the US over 80% of all teachers and "educators" today are women. This too doesn't bode well for 50% of the students as they rarely see male role models going to school.

    As for math if you can't perform the basic arithmetic well, like manipulate fractions, you're doomed moving on to algebra.

    As for Common Core, the whole thing is crap. It was invented by the same people running the system now for people in the system now. That is to say, by colleges of Education, by "Educators" for "Educators."
    Well, if the bunch in there now can't affectively teach the material changing the material isn't going to make them teach it any better.

    It's like the constant demands for more money into education. If the money increased tenfold it'd make little or no difference. The same system would be in place, with the same people doing the same job just for more money. It's no different than McDonald's workers demanding $15 an hour. Is your burger and fries going to be any better? Will the service improve any? I doubt it.

    And, you're right, we do treat every kid as if he or she was going to go to college. That's quite different from most other education systems where the ones who are poor performers are separated from the high performers and even given different curricula based on expected outcomes. I'm not saying that's always a better system, but it does try to match the teaching to the student rather than "One size fits all" and a "everybody's going to college" system like we have.

    I could see two things that would make the US system better in a hurry.

    1. Dump the need for a degree in "Education" for hiring teachers that know their subject(s) whatever their background. Make sure they stay on their toes by a combination of review and testing... preferably by outside auditors independent of the school system.

    2. Integrate the curricula such that students get some of each subject, or many subjects, in each class. For example, students are made to write out answers and produce written documents in science, history, etc., not just English class. In history include discoveries in math, science, and other subjects not just some vague social-political history. In English class include writing about science, history, math, etc., as part of the learning process.

    I also agree that repetition is necessary and at the lowest grades probably the very best way to get the lessons across. Trying to get an 8 year old to visualize or fathom some complex, abstract concept is not going to work well with virtually any kid.

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    • #47
      Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
      I agree there. The average teacher has little background in math or science (or anything technical for that matter). Worse, in the US over 80% of all teachers and "educators" today are women. This too doesn't bode well for 50% of the students as they rarely see male role models going to school.
      Don't you need a degree in what you teach in the U.S.A.? In British Columbia, for grade school you need a degree with certain breadth requirements, including Canadian content. For high school you need a major, or two minors, in teachable subjects. And, depending on the university you go to a B.Ed or a year long professional development program.
      AHIKS - Play by (E)mail board wargaming since 1965.
      The Blitz - Play by Email computer wargaming.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Duncan View Post
        Don't you need a degree in what you teach in the U.S.A.? In British Columbia, for grade school you need a degree with certain breadth requirements, including Canadian content. For high school you need a major, or two minors, in teachable subjects. And, depending on the university you go to a B.Ed or a year long professional development program.
        Yes, you do. In fact, it must be in education or include a number of specific classes in education. I find that, the need for specific classes in "Education" to be short of asinine. Someone who is say a chemist with a master's in that subject really doesn't need to go back to college to supposedly learn how to teach.
        That person wouldn't need those courses to teach at a university, so why would they need it to teach K to 12 students? Yet, they do.

        The way I see it, anyone with a degree is likely capable of being an elementary school teacher, on degree or classes in "Education" needed.

        What I'm saying is that I'd rather have someone who got a BS degree in some science teaching science to students in a high school for example than a person with an Education degree and a smattering of science courses doing it.
        I'd prefer that coaches with a background in physical education in high schools weren't teaching history and civics either. That's very common.

        People with considerable education and skills gained from working in industry are generally turned away from education by "Educrats" because they lack the useless course work in education. That just shows me the people running US education are the true idiots.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
          Someone who is say a chemist with a master's in that subject really doesn't need to go back to college to supposedly learn how to teach.
          Indeed. Anyone who ever played football in college is fully qualified to coach it professionally.

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          • #50
            If you want to get an idea on the current values of American education, that is to say, what we are as a society investing in for our schools, do yourself a favor and just google "Teachers Salaries" then ask yourself is that in one worth the debt that comes with a college education.
            Then google "High School Football Coach Salaries," then you will get the idea of what is wrong.
            Alabama,
            http://highschoolsports.al.com/news/...r-coach-makes/
            Other teachers in Alabama?
            http://www.myaea.org/wp-content/uplo...edule-2015.pdf
            You can check any state, Texas has many high school coaches making more then all the teachers in the school district combined.
            Why should we care?
            Football is an elective, not a requirement. If art teachers which also teach an elective were being paid the way coaches are, need I say, there would be hell boiling over.
            Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
            Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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            • #51
              Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
              Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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