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  • Broken system lets problem officers jump from job to job

    Law enforcement officers accused of sexual misconduct have jumped from job to job — and at times faced fresh allegations that include raping women — because of a tattered network of laws and lax screening that allowed them to stay on the beat.

    A yearlong Associated Press investigation into sex abuse by cops, jail guards, deputies and other state law enforcement officials uncovered a broken system for policing bad officers, with significant flaws in how agencies deal with those suspected of sexual misconduct and glaring warning signs that go unreported or get overlooked.

    The AP examination found about 1,000 officers in six years who lost their licenses because of sex crimes that included rape, or sexual misconduct ranging from propositioning citizens to consensual but prohibited on-duty intercourse. That number fails to reflect the breadth of the problem, however, because it measures only officers who faced an official process called decertification and not all states have such a system or provided records.

    In states that do revoke law enforcement licenses, the process can take years, enabling problem officers to find other jobs. And while there is a national index of decertified officers, contributing to it is voluntary and experts say the database, which is not open to the public, is missing thousands of names.
    AP - Full Article

  • #2
    Actually, the practice is the direct result of an employment and termination practice that began decades ago when employers decided it was easier to allow employees to resign rather than to terminate them and risk a lawsuit of some kind.

    Under this practice, the only job reference a former employer can provide is the dates of employment and whether or not the individual is considered eligible for re-hire.

    Cops, like nurses, CNA's and several other professions, therefore move easily from one failed job to another.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
      Actually, the practice is the direct result of an employment and termination practice that began decades ago when employers decided it was easier to allow employees to resign rather than to terminate them and risk a lawsuit of some kind.

      Under this practice, the only job reference a former employer can provide is the dates of employment and whether or not the individual is considered eligible for re-hire.

      Cops, like nurses, CNA's and several other professions, therefore move easily from one failed job to another.
      Not quite accurate...No cop is hired without his personnel file from his previous law enforcement position..(Hires in Florida) A typical polygraph question is asked if he in fact did resign in lieu of being terminated...If his Agency is accredited, his misdeed is is in there (and the law)...If it is not, even more scrutiny is paid to the applicant...If his misdeed would not warrant termination and he resigned anyway good chance he maybe hired..Depends on the offense and the agency...Trust me (or not)..we or any good size agency do not operate on the assumptions of probable law suits, its not an issue or a fear its constant and most have staff just for that...Of course I am referring to Florida..

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Darth Holliday View Post
        Not quite accurate...No cop is hired without his personnel file from his previous law enforcement position..(Hires in Florida) A typical polygraph question is asked if he in fact did resign in lieu of being terminated...If his Agency is accredited, his misdeed is is in there (and the law)...If it is not, even more scrutiny is paid to the applicant...If his misdeed would not warrant termination and he resigned anyway good chance he maybe hired..Depends on the offense and the agency...Trust me (or not)..we or any good size agency do not operate on the assumptions of probable law suits, its not an issue or a fear its constant and most have staff just for that...Of course I am referring to Florida..
        Sorry - my experience is with medical personnel where my wife works, and bad apples show up all of the time and get hired. The key question usually is "Have you ever been fired?" Well...not if you were allowed to resign to avoid the hassle.

        Apparently Florida is one of the exceptions to laxity in hiring. My congratulations.

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        • #5
          If that's the case then why shouldn't the key question be, "Were you ever allowed to resign in lieu of being fired?"
          ARRRR! International Talk Like A Pirate Day - September 19th
          IN MARE IN COELO

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