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Three correctional officers charged with murder

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  • Three correctional officers charged with murder

    Another case of a man beaten to death by officers. This one looks bad for the correctional officers. Besides all the internal & external injuries, they also failed to immediately report the incident. The 3 correctional officers are now in the same jail they used to guard.



    San Jose jail death: Sheriff condemns 3 correctional officers booked on murder in fatal beating

    SAN JOSE -- The three guards at Santa Clara County Main Jail were only supposed to be conducting a routine search of Michael Tyree's cell, looking for extra clothing or toiletries that inmates often try to hoard. Instead, the correctional officers did something "violent and cowardly," Sheriff Laurie Smith said Thursday, that left the 31-year-old mentally ill man lying naked on the floor, covered in lacerations and bruises and bleeding to death internally.

    http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-cou...death-arrested
    "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

  • #2
    What they did was wrong, but entirely predictable. In an environment where guards are often unarmed targets and are frequently attacked, injured and killed a backlash is to be expected.

    I expect, unfortunately, that we will see a lot more of this until society learns to properly handle inmates.
    Last edited by Mountain Man; 04 Sep 15, 12:14. Reason: spelling due to diplopia
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      County jails in California are run by the sheriff's department. But in the late 80's, due to controversies over overcrowding and overspending, voters approved a measure to create a separate Department of Correction. The DoC would hire its own lesser-paid jailers to save money and bring the jails more under the control of supervisors. After 2 decades, this experiment proved to save less than expected. Three years ago, the voters gave control back to the sheriff's department. This switch back created a hybrid operation. The jail have deputies who do supervisorial work, but for much of the line work, the jail still employs correctional officers who work under the sheriff's office but are represented by a different union.

      The 3 guards were correctional officers, not sworn deputies.
      Last edited by Persephone; 04 Sep 15, 11:48.
      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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      • #4
        Our correctional system here in Colorado is dangerously understaffed due to budget constraints, while it bulges at the seams with violent offenders. It's a recipe for disaster and violent incidents like this, just waiting to happen.

        Interestingly, the old correctional systems were run oppressively, with a clear understanding between officers and inmates that problems brought instant and violent retribution, and those systems, despite their frequent brutality, worked.

        Roy Best, the most well known warden in Colorado's history and a major reformer, walked alone through crowded prison yards accompanied by his two trained attack Dobermans., and the officers on the walls were there to shoot offenders.

        The Great PC Society has lost the ability to control violent, anti-social and sociopathic criminals in any realistic and effective way. A return to the violence of the past is not the best answer, but the current system is far worse.

        I'm sure you know as I do, that the officers do not control our prisons; the inmates do.
        Last edited by Mountain Man; 04 Sep 15, 12:57. Reason: spelling due to diplopia
        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          Our correctional system here in Colorado is dangerously understaffed due to budget constraints, while it bulges at the seams with violent offenders. It's a recipe for disaster and violent incidents like this, just waiting to happen.

          Interestingly, the old correctional systems were run oppressively, with a clear understanding between officers and inmates that problems brought instant and violent retribution, and those systems, despite their frequent brutality, worked.

          Roy Best, the most well known warden in Colorado's history and a major reformer, walked alone through crowded prison yards accompanied by his two trained attack Dobermans., and the officers on the walls were there to shoot offenders.

          The Great PC Society has lost the ability to control violent, anti-social and sociopathic criminals in any realistic and effective way. A return to the violence of the past is not the best answer, but the current system is far worse.

          I'm sure you know as I do, that the offers do not control our prisons; the inmates do.
          Also consider that you're stuffing the jails with people who aren't anti-social, sociopaths or violent. More resources guarding them means less resources guarding those that are the actual trouble. The real issue, IMO, is that in todays society they punish everyone.
          Wisdom is personal

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Karri View Post
            Also consider that you're stuffing the jails with people who aren't anti-social, sociopaths or violent. More resources guarding them means less resources guarding those that are the actual trouble. The real issue, IMO, is that in todays society they punish everyone.
            Not in America, just the lawbreakers. The problem is, too many people feel free to break the laws in a society where the leaders and the privileged do not obey the laws to begin with.

            Law is an "all or nothing" concept.
            Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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            • #7
              That and since we've 'reformed' the mental health system, it's flooded the jails with the mentally ill at a rate unknown previously........close the asylums and jailers completely out of their element have taken the place of trained mental ward staff.

              That being said, these incidents do happen, and will happen, so long as humans interact with humans. Looks like the Sheriff did a good investigation, and is pursuing charges by the book.
              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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              • #8
                Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                That and since we've 'reformed' the mental health system, it's flooded the jails with the mentally ill at a rate unknown previously........close the asylums and jailers completely out of their element have taken the place of trained mental ward staff.

                That being said, these incidents do happen, and will happen, so long as humans interact with humans. Looks like the Sheriff did a good investigation, and is pursuing charges by the book.
                Agreed on all counts, but will he investigate the environment that brought this incident about? When a criminal is tried for murder, his entire life clear back to his childhood is considered as causative, including the society nd environment surrounding him. Obviously the jail environment should be investigated in the same way to determine how much staff violence is attributable to it.
                Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                  Not in America, just the lawbreakers.
                  Just like in North Korea. In any case, the problem then is that you have too many lawbreakers...maybe, instead of always saying they deserve it etc., consider making some of the things legal. You know, the ones that are really question of opinions and morals anyways. Not murder and stuff.
                  Wisdom is personal

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                  • #10
                    That's a ridiculous statement entirely unworthy of you. We are nothing like North Korea, Are you?

                    Law breakers define themselves by breaking laws. We don't go out and round up innocent people and accuse them of nebulous political "crimes". In fact, we try hard not to have to arrest people because the system is overflowing, because a) no one teaches kids moral values any more, b) kids today expect instant gratification and do not accept being asked to deny themselves, and c) we live in a society where only the poor and the middle class expect to be asked to obey the laws in the first place, and that isn't working out anymore.
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                      County jails in California are run by the sheriff's department. But in the late 80's, due to controversies over overcrowding and overspending, voters approved a measure to create a separate Department of Correction. The DoC would hire its own lesser-paid jailers to save money and bring the jails more under the control of supervisors. After 2 decades, this experiment proved to save less than expected. Three years ago, the voters gave control back to the sheriff's department. This switch back created a hybrid operation. The jail have deputies who do supervisorial work, but for much of the line work, the jail still employs correctional officers who work under the sheriff's office but are represented by a different union.

                      The 3 guards were correctional officers, not sworn deputies.
                      Very few floor staff in county facilities are sworn deputies. Odds are the 'deputies' supervising in the jail are not actually sworn officer. Usually you only see sworn officers in transport units.

                      Hence the title 'Corrections officer'.

                      Interesting that the Sheriff is bad-mouthing them-apparently the lessons of Philly and NO haven't sunk in yet. Nor does she seem to want to address why three green COs were operating with zero supervision. Or why something so basic as video recoding is absent.

                      She had best pray that when all is said and done, the autopsy doesn't indicate self-inflicted wounds. Concrete boxes with bolted-down steel furniture are dangerous places for EDPs with drug problems.
                      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                        Very few floor staff in county facilities are sworn deputies. Odds are the 'deputies' supervising in the jail are not actually sworn officer. Usually you only see sworn officers in transport units.

                        Hence the title 'Corrections officer'.

                        Interesting that the Sheriff is bad-mouthing them-apparently the lessons of Philly and NO haven't sunk in yet. Nor does she seem to want to address why three green COs were operating with zero supervision. Or why something so basic as video recoding is absent.

                        She had best pray that when all is said and done, the autopsy doesn't indicate self-inflicted wounds. Concrete boxes with bolted-down steel furniture are dangerous places for EDPs with drug problems.
                        She won't be responsible for that. That particular issue will fall on the shoulders of those who specified the terms of the contract in the first place, and who designed it and approved it and built it.

                        Correctional officers have to work with what they have, and have zero input into designs and construction.

                        I've worked in facilities designed by morons and built by imbecilic lunatics. No one ever listens to line staff before they start building their latest boondoggle.

                        The worst one I ever saw was an entryway built with a narrow right angle turn into an infirmary. I was informed that this broke up the impetus of an inmate riot charging down the hall, but everyone got a blank look when I pointed out that a patient on a gurney could not make the turn and this health and safety were threatened by poor design. The big brass monkeys listened politely, and then built it with the right angle road block anyway, and it did, indeed, stop litters and guernies from being used for transport serious cases.

                        You cannot fix stupid.
                        Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                          The 3 correctional officers are now in the same jail they used to guard.

                          They've been moved to the jail in Dublin, CA. There have been protesters gathering at the Santa Clara jail everyday since the inmate died.


                          The three correctional officers were booked on suspicion of murder, assault under color of authority, and conspiracy and transferred to protective custody at Santa Rita Jail in Dublin. Out-of-county holding is typical for suspects who work in jails or have sensitive law-enforcement assignments.
                          The three officers are in protective custody in Alameda County in keeping with protocol to hold suspects who have either worked in jail or other sensitive law-enforcement jobs outside of the county that employs them.
                          Last edited by Nikki; 05 Sep 15, 14:37.

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                          • #14
                            Update

                            Since this incident other inmates have come forward with claims of abuse from the same 3 correctional officers. Now the inmates say they have been threatened. Today, sheriff's investigators descended on the cell block, locked it down, rotated in new guards and began conducting a criminal investigation.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                              What they did was wrong, but entirely predictable. In an environment where guards are often unarmed targets and are frequently attacked, injured and killed a backlash is to be expected.

                              I expect, unfortunately, that we will see a lot more of this until society learns to properly handle inmates.
                              Society? Society isn't at fault. Society didn't beat an inmate to death.

                              This is just business as usual. Wouldn't even make the news in most cases. The guard mentality makes police mentality look benevolent.

                              One of my good friends just took a job as a jailer. He's already becoming a total swine. I feel sorry for him.

                              But I'm looking forward to reading about the forced inmate fight club at his facility.
                              Last edited by Paul Mann III; 12 Sep 15, 17:09.
                              "This life..., you know, "the life." Youíre not gonna get any medals, kid. This is not a hero business; you donít shoot people from a mile a way. You gotta stand right next to them... blow their heads off."

                              BoRG

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