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  • #31
    Originally posted by Bow View Post
    Looking at the figures on Americans who have moved to Canada over the years for various reasons ....maybe the proposed wall, rather than keep us guys out , is to keep your less than happy citizens "IN"
    Maybe like the 'Berlin Wall'? Funny how walls tend to work two ways in both the physical and the psychological - heck, that's a total of 2x2 - ah, 4 ways.

    Walls have a habit of eventually tumbling down:

    https://youtu.be/8RDoLI2MY9Q

    Now, perhaps if most of the rest of the world wasn't such a crap place to live in?

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
      Thanks. Canada and US: tied at the hip, for good and ill. We dominate this continent as no two other countries dominate theirs. We have to live together, 'cause if we don't, we have no where else to go.
      We're family.
      ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

      BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

      BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by Nichols View Post
        From the OP:

        "Walker said some people in New Hampshire have asked the campaign about the topic. "They raised some very legitimate concerns, including some law enforcement folks that brought that up to me at one of our town hall meetings about a week and a half ago. So that is a legitimate issue for us to look at," Walker said."

        Walker is claiming that the people to include LEOs raised the question.....

        Should a politician not look into something the voters are requesting?

        It isn't like he said 'I will if elected President' he just said that they will look into it.
        I'd like to know which US LEOs think that a wall is needed along our border? A Canadian friend of mine living in Fort Covington, NY has told me that some of BP Agents go bat **** crazy from the boredom of their post, so maybe it was them that came up with such lunacy.

        Talking about walls only makes Walker look stupid, not that US security concerns are unjustified, they very much are, but suggesting that a 5,525 mile long wall could be built to address that is just dumb. He would do well to remember that we "militarized" our border security in the form of CBSA at the request of the US post 9/11.

        Canada is America's partner, not your enemy in the security of our continent. We are not drug infested & crime ridden Mexico, we are your closest ally and even entertaining the idea of a wall between us is an insult.


        Also, Cruz 2016!
        A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
          Might have been a couple of thousand, it's hard to be sure, but we know that 56 Canadians died while in US service in Viet Nam.
          Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
          Can't rep you again so soon but the post earns one.and I add that
          Yup, completely forgotten.

          A lot more Yanks joined our forces before Pearl Harbor as well.

          https://www.warhistoryonline.com/war...ion-peace.html

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by slick_miester View Post
            Might have been a couple of thousand, it's hard to be sure, but we know that 56 Canadians died while in US service in Viet Nam.
            I believe the figure may be higher:

            Near the U.S. border there is one memorial, The North Wall, at Assumption Park, Windsor, Ontario, overlooking the Detroit River. It honors the 103 Canadians who lost their lives in Vietnam and the seven who went missing in action. It is a fine tribute to those Canadians who served and sacrificed all for their belief in freedom.
            Of the more than 58,000 names inscribed on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington D.C., 103 of them are of “known” Canadians who served with United States forces. Although the United States has honored those fallen Canadians who did not return from the Vietnam war, their own native country has never officially done so.

            http://barneykin.com/northwall/

            However, by comparison, Australia's contribution and loss as a staunch ally of the USA was much greater than Canada's - especially considering that Canada's population is around 150% that of Australia's:

            1962 - 1975

            Served: 49,211
            Died: 520
            Wounded: 2,396
            Men awarded the Victoria Cross: 4

            http://rslnsw.org.au/commemoration/h...he-vietnam-war

            The Australian armed forces that participated there were paid for by the Australian taxpayer, whilst Canadian businesses were merely selling military goods and general supplies to the US and making profits.

            I don't want to rain on the parade, but Canada seems to be wanting to reap the benefits of being a secure and peaceful Western democracy, but does not want to contribute fully to the costs, physical and financial, of assisting coalition nations in maintaining or promoting Western values.

            I was only vaguely aware of this until I read the other recent thread about the shocking decline of Canada's navy.

            Unfortunately, closer to home, New Zealand is traveling down the same path, which is another nation happy to lean on a larger neighbour for security and to pay the associated costs.
            Last edited by At ease; 01 Sep 15, 09:57.
            "It's like shooting rats in a barrel."
            "You'll be in a barrel if you don't watch out for the fighters!"

            "Talking about airplanes is a very pleasant mental disease."
            — Sergei(son of Igor) Sikorsky, 'AOPA Pilot' magazine February 2003.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
              I'd like to know which US LEOs think that a wall is needed along our border? A Canadian friend of mine living in Fort Covington, NY has told me that some of BP Agents go bat **** crazy from the boredom of their post, so maybe it was them that came up with such lunacy.
              Not only is it usually pretty quiet up there, but given the volume of cross-border trade, a wall might very well prove self-defeating, as well.

              Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
              Talking about walls only makes Walker look stupid, not that US security concerns are unjustified, they very much are, but suggesting that a 5,525 mile long wall could be built to address that is just dumb. He would do well to remember that we "militarized" our border security in the form of CBSA at the request of the US post 9/11.
              The expense would certainly not prove justifiable.

              Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
              Canada is America's partner, not your enemy in the security of our continent. We are not drug infested & crime ridden Mexico, we are your closest ally and even entertaining the idea of a wall between us is an insult.
              I can think of certain individual Canadians who should be surrounded by their own personal walls:

              [img][/img]



              That hair alone should have been a crime against humanity.

              And mere words can't do this justice:



              Wow!

              This one can be taken care of pretty handily, however.



              What I want to know is why are Canadian taxpayers supporting hosers like this:



              What is wrong with your government?

              Originally posted by At ease View Post
              I believe the figure may be higher:






              http://barneykin.com/northwall/

              However, by comparison, Australia's contribution and loss as a staunch ally of the USA was much greater than Canada's:

              962 - 1975

              Served: 49,211
              Died: 520
              Wounded: 2,396
              Men awarded the Victoria Cross: 4

              http://rslnsw.org.au/commemoration/h...he-vietnam-war
              Well, Canberra did openly and officially participate in Viet Nam, while Ottawa declined. The number of Canadians who served with US forces might be difficult to compile I'm guessing because some number of them might have been dual US-Canadian citizens: they can be counted either way.
              I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

                Well, Canberra did openly and officially participate in Viet Nam, while Ottawa declined. The number of Canadians who served with US forces might be difficult to compile I'm guessing because some number of them might have been dual US-Canadian citizens: they can be counted either way.
                The number who served is very important.

                To establish the number and names of those that died is vital.

                The source that I referred to seems quite confident in it's tally.

                So much so that it is etched in stone.
                "It's like shooting rats in a barrel."
                "You'll be in a barrel if you don't watch out for the fighters!"

                "Talking about airplanes is a very pleasant mental disease."
                — Sergei(son of Igor) Sikorsky, 'AOPA Pilot' magazine February 2003.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally Posted by slick_miester
                  Thanks. Canada and US: tied at the hip, for good and ill. We dominate this continent as no two other countries dominate theirs. We have to live together, 'cause if we don't, we have no where else to go.
                  Not a valid concept. We're supposed to be that way with Mexico, too, but we know how that's working out.

                  Canada has her own agenda, and has largely pushed off all of her own defense on to us, just for starters. Then there is the issue of sheltering and abetting American deserters and criminals. Hardly the actions of a good neighbor, close friend and staunch ally.
                  Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by At ease View Post
                    The number who served is very important.

                    To establish the number and names of those that died is vital.

                    The source that I referred to seems quite confident in it's tally.

                    So much so that it is etched in stone.
                    Nothing is ever "etched in stone". The Viet Nam Wall is missing numerous names, just for starters.

                    Nothing created or done by Man is ever completely accurate or truthful.

                    Canada does very little to support American efforts, while leaving the defense of North America entirely on our shoulders and budget. Same for defending the American coastline. Canada doesn't even have an actual Navy any more.
                    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                      Not a valid concept. We're supposed to be that way with Mexico, too, but we know how that's working out.
                      It's not, and it's proven bad for Mexico, bad for the US, and bad for all the people on both sides of the border. Mexico is now a basket case -- which our asinine War on Drugs has done its level best to create. But how any of that applies to Canada I'm sure I don't know.

                      Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                      Canada has her own agenda, and has largely pushed off all of her own defense on to us, just for starters. Then there is the issue of sheltering and abetting American deserters and criminals. Hardly the actions of a good neighbor, close friend and staunch ally.
                      By that point, Rob Furlong, Tim McMeekin and three other Canadian sharpshooters — Graham Ragsdale, Arron Perry and Dennis Eason — had spent nearly a week in the rugged terrain of Afghanistan's Shahikot Valley, reaching out and touching the enemy from distances even they had never trained for. But that shot was something special. Rob Furlong had just killed another human being from 2,430 m, the rough equivalent of standing at Toronto's CN Tower and hitting a target near Bloor Street. It was — and still is — the longest-ever recorded kill by a sniper in combat, surpassing the mark of 2,250 m set by U.S. Marine Gunnery Sgt. Carlos Hathcock during the Vietnam War.

                      It should have been a moment of pride for the Canadian army. Five of its most talented snipers — men trained to kill without remorse, then turn around and kill again — did exactly that. They destroyed al-Qaeda firing positions, saved American lives and tallied a body count unmatched by any Canadian soldier of their generation. U.S. commanders who served alongside the snipers nominated all five for the coveted Bronze Star medal. "Thank God the Canadians were there," is how one American soldier put it.

                      "‘We were abandoned’: An elite unit of snipers went from standouts to outcasts — victims, many say, of a witch hunt driven by jealousy and fear," by Michael Friscolanti, Maclean's, 15 May 2006
                      I'd say those Canucks did alright by us.
                      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by At ease View Post
                        I believe the figure may be higher:






                        http://barneykin.com/northwall/

                        However, by comparison, Australia's contribution and loss as a staunch ally of the USA was much greater than Canada's - especially considering that Canada's population is around 150% that of Australia's:

                        1962 - 1975

                        Served: 49,211
                        Died: 520
                        Wounded: 2,396
                        Men awarded the Victoria Cross: 4

                        http://rslnsw.org.au/commemoration/h...he-vietnam-war

                        The Australian armed forces that participated there were paid for by the Australian taxpayer, whilst Canadian businesses were merely selling military goods and general supplies to the US and making profits.

                        I don't want to rain on the parade, but Canada seems to be wanting to reap the benefits of being a secure and peaceful Western democracy, but does not want to contribute fully to the costs, physical and financial, of assisting coalition nations in maintaining or promoting Western values.

                        I was only vaguely aware of this until I read the other recent thread about the shocking decline of Canada's navy.

                        Unfortunately, closer to home, New Zealand is traveling down the same path, which is another nation happy to lean on a larger neighbour for security and to pay the associated costs.
                        I hope that this will adequately illustrate our lack of participation in Vietnam.
                        Our involvement would have meant little though, given the way the LBJ administration was conducting the war. Nixon almost secured total victory but caved too soon due to the political pressure. We could have had a unified free & Democratic Vietnam to this day if the US military wasn't fighting with it's hands cuffed behind it's back.
                        A wild liberal appears! Conservative uses logical reasoning and empirical evidence! It's super effective! Wild liberal faints.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by At ease View Post
                          I believe the figure may be higher:






                          http://barneykin.com/northwall/

                          However, by comparison, Australia's contribution and loss as a staunch ally of the USA was much greater than Canada's - especially considering that Canada's population is around 150% that of Australia's:

                          1962 - 1975

                          Served: 49,211
                          Died: 520
                          Wounded: 2,396
                          Men awarded the Victoria Cross: 4

                          http://rslnsw.org.au/commemoration/h...he-vietnam-war

                          The Australian armed forces that participated there were paid for by the Australian taxpayer, whilst Canadian businesses were merely selling military goods and general supplies to the US and making profits.

                          I don't want to rain on the parade, but Canada seems to be wanting to reap the benefits of being a secure and peaceful Western democracy, but does not want to contribute fully to the costs, physical and financial, of assisting coalition nations in maintaining or promoting Western values.

                          I was only vaguely aware of this until I read the other recent thread about the shocking decline of Canada's navy.

                          Unfortunately, closer to home, New Zealand is traveling down the same path, which is another nation happy to lean on a larger neighbour for security and to pay the associated costs.
                          You have a point. I'd like to see Canada increase it's spending to 2% of GNP on the military.However, I do not agree that Canada should have fought in VietNam but then again I don't agree that the United States should have either. Canada has a pretty good record of being out their doing it's bit over the years.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by Destroyer25 View Post
                            Our involvement would have meant little though, given the way the LBJ administration was conducting the war. Nixon almost secured total victory but caved too soon due to the political pressure. We could have had a unified free & Democratic Vietnam to this day if the US military wasn't fighting with it's hands cuffed behind it's back.
                            I've seen plenty of people over claim for Nixon, but few have ever gone so far as to suggest that an agreement that left the North in possession of 10% of Sth Vietnam & able to station 150,000 troops on Southern soil as close to 'total victory'. Thieu, Ky & the GVN felt they'd been completely sold out and the DRV considered it a win, but hey, what would they know.
                            Human beings are the only creatures on Earth that claim a god and the only living thing that behaves like it hasn't got one - Hunter S. Thompson

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