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Bounty hunters raid police chief's house!

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  • Bounty hunters raid police chief's house!

    In a twist of fate the Phoenix chief of police found out what it's like to have your home raided at 2:00 am by mistake,meh doesn't like it much.....

    " A group of armed bounty hunters surrounded the home of Phoenix's police chief Tuesday night, and one of them was arrested after a flawed search for a fugitive ended in a confrontation with the city's top cop, police said.

    Eleven armed bounty hunters pounded on Police Chief Joseph Yahner's door about 10 p.m., sparking a fierce argument, the Phoenix Police Department said in a statement Wednesday afternoon.

    A swarm of officers responded to the scene and found a group of bondsmen parked on Yahner’s property with their lights shining through the windows, police said. They said one of the men was “banging on the door” and shouting into the residence.
    http://www.officer.com/news/12100469...ce-chiefs-home

    Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
    Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

  • #2
    Lucky the Chief didn't open up on them after loudly announcing that he was the Police.......Come with your buddies and bang on my door late at night and you're going to be hearing some loud verbal commands coming from about 20 inches behind the business end of a carbine.....
    Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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    • #3
      Why is it ok to do this to regular citizens though?
      First Counsul Maleketh of Jonov

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      • #4
        Depending upon the laws of the state in which this occurred, it's ok for Bail Bondsmen (aka bounty hunters) to execute a search of the stated primary residence of a defendant for which they are a surety, for the purpose of returning said defendant to the custody of the proper jurisdiction.

        Basically the bail bondsman springs you from jail, it means that you've signed a contract stating that you are going to do certain things, such as (but not limited to): Not get arrested again until your case is over, stay at a certain house, show up to your court dates, etc.

        Under civil authority, and depending on local laws, a bail bondsman can execute a search of the noted residence for the purposes of returning the defendant to jail and removing themselves as surety. Without this, there would be no impetus for a defendant to ever show up to court or indeed remain available for trial in any way......since the defendant has paid a fee that they will not get back in lieu of having to post the full amount of the bail. Without this, there would be no such thing as bail bondsmen, as they could not ensure that their property (the surety bond posted) would be secure, due to having no ability to influence the behavior of the defendant.

        Now, in this case, the bondsmen surrounded a property, and knocked on the door. No entry was made. Technically the bondsmen did nothing illegal that I can see. The Girl Scouts could surround your house and knock on the door and it's not illegal unless you've posted your property OR tell them to go away and they do not. Had entry been made without consent, then the bondsmen would likely be held liable for Breaking or Entering, and could be sued for a violation of the homeowner's 4th Amendment rights under color of law.
        Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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        • #5
          Let's say a bounty hunter makes entry into a home that the person in question designated as their residence. They break in attempting to seize him, but they don't advertise who they are. The defendant or a family member kills or wounds some of them. Has a crime been committed?
          First Counsul Maleketh of Jonov

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          • #6
            It would depend on the state and the local district attorney.

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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            • #7
              We just had a case in eastern Idaho where a bondsman killed the guy he was serving papers on.
              Here is the problem, the bondsman had a record a mile long.
              As in the case in Pheonix, many of the men hired by bond companies are of questionable character.
              We also have seen many cases where a police officer or even a swat team goes to the wrong house.
              No knock warrants can go real ugly real fast. So what would have been the out come of the Pheonix case if the bondsmen had been swat officers with flash bangs and MP-5s?
              The shoe on the other foot doesn't feel great....
              Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
              Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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              • #8
                Maybe the Chief of police will learn a lesson from this (only one person was arrested out of 12 that were in the raid and that was for having a hand gun out and it may not fly in court).
                The lesson he should take away from this is that his own department does this sort of idiocy too. No knock warrants, getting the home wrong, are not uncommon to most large police departments.
                The difference is these bondsmen are going to be held to a much higher and tougher standard than the police would be.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                  Maybe the Chief of police will learn a lesson from this (only one person was arrested out of 12 that were in the raid and that was for having a hand gun out and it may not fly in court).
                  The lesson he should take away from this is that his own department does this sort of idiocy too. No knock warrants, getting the home wrong, are not uncommon to most large police departments.
                  The difference is these bondsmen are going to be held to a much higher and tougher standard than the police would be.
                  Interesting concept
                  Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                  Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Delenda estRoma View Post
                    Let's say a bounty hunter makes entry into a home that the person in question designated as their residence. They break in attempting to seize him, but they don't advertise who they are. The defendant or a family member kills or wounds some of them. Has a crime been committed?
                    Not in Texas!
                    Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Delenda estRoma View Post
                      Let's say a bounty hunter makes entry into a home that the person in question designated as their residence. They break in attempting to seize him, but they don't advertise who they are. The defendant or a family member kills or wounds some of them. Has a crime been committed?
                      In Arizona, no but if the bounty hunters fight back, yes. There is a case years ago of a bounty hunting team breaking into a residence. The tied up several people in the home as they searched then got into a gunfight with the owner. He and his wife were killed, and one of the bounty hunters was wounded.

                      The leading bounty hunter got life in prison, his son got like 30 years, and the other 3 with him got 10+ for things like kidnapping, assault, etc.

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                      • #12
                        AMMON — Ninety minutes after a briefing on his first bounty hunter operation, Christopher Schulthies fired five shots at Philip Clay, hitting him at least four times.

                        Clay, 58, died March 15.

                        By his own account, Schulthies had no experience in bail recovery, and his security career consisted of six to eight shifts as a bouncer at a nightclub, working weekends for VETS Security.

                        Details of the bounty hunters’ efforts to track Clay were gleaned from police records and interviews conducted by the Post Register.

                        Bonneville County Prosecutor Danny Clark announced last week that Schulthies would not be charged in Clay’s death.

                        Schulthies was the last member to join a group of bounty hunters tracking Clay, a fugitive with a warrant out of Ada County. He had skipped out on a $100,000 bond on felony drug charges.

                        Led by Guy Bracali-Gambino, the tracking tactics employed by the bounty hunters in the days leading up to the shooting have been criticized by an expert, as well as nearly everyone they encountered.

                        According to police documents, those tactics included harboring a fugitive, unlawful search and seizure, and impersonating an officer. Clark said an investigation is underway into alleged illegal actions that preceded the shooting.

                        “It appeared to be once again that Guy was trying to play law enforcement so he could apprehend Philip,” wrote Bonneville County Deputy Randy Flegel in his narrative report. “At this time I lost all trust in Guy due to him continuing to lie or be deceptive with us. I told Guy he needed to stop contacting dispatch at their request and to stop contacting the Sheriff’s Office due to his lies and deceptive behavior.”

                        Read more here: http://www.idahostatesman.com/2015/0...#storylink=cpy
                        Dispite our best intentions, the system is dysfunctional that intelligence failure is guaranteed.
                        Russ Travers, CIA analyst, 2001

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