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  • #16
    Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
    This bimbo is a moron...
    In a rebuff to coal, oil and gas companies, Rachel Kyte, the World Bank climate change envoy, said continued use of coal...

    Oil and gas companies are direct competitors to the coal industry. Whatever hurts the coal industry, helps the oil and gas industry... However, whatever hurts the coal industry, harms consumers of electricity.

    The mythical social costs of carbon do not outweigh the real costs of poverty in the Third World. Denying the Third World access to affordable, reliable energy (coal, oil and natural gas) is tantamount to a crime against humanity.
    Unless you believe Anthropogenic Global Warming will cause massive social upheaval.

    In this forum there is almost no opposition to skepticism for AGW but outside this forums there is almost no opposition to accepting that AGW is a serious threat to the world's welfare.
    We hunt the hunters

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    • #17
      Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
      Unless you believe Anthropogenic Global Warming will cause massive social upheaval.

      In this forum there is almost no opposition to skepticism for AGW but outside this forums there is almost no opposition to accepting that AGW is a serious threat to the world's welfare.
      It's just math...
      The Poor Need Cheap Fossil Fuels
      By BJORN LOMBORG DEC. 3, 2013

      PRAGUE — THERE’S a lot of hand-wringing about our warming planet, but billions of people face a more immediate problem: They are desperately poor, and many cook and heat their homes using open fires or leaky stoves that burn dirty fuels like wood, dung, crop waste and coal.

      About 3.5 million of them die prematurely each year as a result of breathing the polluted air inside their homes — about 200,000 more than the number who die prematurely each year from breathing polluted air outside, according to a study by the World Health Organization.

      There’s no question that burning fossil fuels is leading to a warmer climate and that addressing this problem is important. But doing so is a question of timing and priority. For many parts of the world, fossil fuels are still vital and will be for the next few decades, because they are the only means to lift people out of the smoke and darkness of energy poverty.

      More than 1.2 billion people around the world have no access to electricity, according to the International Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook for 2012. Most of them live in sub-Saharan Africa and in Asia.

      [...]

      Even more people — an estimated three billion — still cook and heat their homes using open fires and leaky stoves, according to the energy agency. More efficient stoves could help. And solar panels could provide LED lights and power to charge cellphones.

      But let’s face it. What those living in energy poverty need are reliable, low-cost fossil fuels, at least until we can make a global transition to a greener energy future. This is not just about powering stoves and refrigerators to improve billions of lives but about powering agriculture and industry that will improve lives.

      Over the last 30 years, China moved an estimated 680 million people out of poverty by giving them access to modern energy, mostly powered by coal.

      [...]

      The developed world needs a smarter approach toward cleaner fuels. The United States has been showing the way. Hydraulic fracturing has produced an abundance of inexpensive natural gas, leading to a shift away from coal in electricity production. Because burning natural gas emits half the carbon dioxide of coal, this technology has helped the United States reduce carbon dioxide emissions to the lowest level since the mid-1990s, even as emissions rise globally. We need to export this technology and help other nations exploit it.

      At the same time, wealthy Western nations must step up investments into research and development in green energy technologies to ensure that cleaner energy eventually becomes so cheap that everyone will want it.

      But until then they should not stand in the way of poorer nations as they turn to coal and other fossil fuels. This approach will get our priorities right. And perhaps then, people will be able to cook in their own homes without slowly killing themselves.

      Bjorn Lomborg is the director of the Copenhagen Consensus Center, a nonprofit group focused on cost-effective solutions to global problems, and the author of “The Skeptical Environmentalist.”

      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/04/op...uels.html?_r=0
      Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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      • #18
        There's not even a majority in the American Meteorological Society who agree with this...
        Originally posted by wolfhnd View Post
        [O]utside this forums there is almost no opposition to accepting that AGW is a serious threat to the world's welfare.
        40% of the people in the world have never even heard of climate change...
        Four in 10 adults throughout the world have never heard of climate change, according to a new Yale-led study in “Nature.”

        https://agenda.weforum.org/2015/07/w...ampaign=buffer


        Last edited by The Doctor; 30 Jul 15, 09:40.
        Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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