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Jade Helm and the GOP

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  • johns624
    replied
    Originally posted by ChrisF1987 View Post
    If that's the case then I wear that label with pride
    Don't worry, they'll be nice to you in a year. Until then, you're a RINO, not a real American, libtard and the rest. Then, next autumn, when things are looking bad for them, they'll come at you with the "you have to vote for us because we aren't as bad as them and a third party vote is a vote for "them" line. It happens every four years. Get used to it...

    Leave a comment:


  • ChrisF1987
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    Ah-so you're a RINO.
    If that's the case then I wear that label with pride

    Leave a comment:


  • johns624
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    There is also the issue that many Americans who are not party-affiliated are single-issue voters. You see this a great deal in purple states.
    Are you referring to the ones who voted for Obama because he was black or those who voted for McCain because they wanted to "hit" Palin?

    Leave a comment:


  • Daemon of Decay
    replied
    Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
    If the demographics of the nation shift to the point that by 2050, a majority of the electorate will be dependent on government assistance, the nation is doomed anyway.

    We'll have this train wreck long before 2050...



    We can force the Federal government back into its constitutional box or we can become very large version of Greece.
    The problem is that neither side supports true cuts to really balance the budget, because to do so is political suicide. To give the GOP credit they at least seem more dedicated towards a sustainable economy and are aware that expensive social programs to keep people happy can't indefinitely increase faster than the economy grows, but they're still restrained in many arenas, such as military spending and taxes.

    Leave a comment:


  • johns624
    replied
    Originally posted by ChrisF1987 View Post
    Surprise, surprise! I happen to be a registered Republican, been so since I registered to vote in 2006. Centrist on social issues, hawkish on foreign policy, pro-free market, and a moderate on fiscal policy.
    How fast they turn on you...

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by ChrisF1987 View Post
    Surprise, surprise! I happen to be a registered Republican, been so since I registered to vote in 2006. Centrist on social issues, hawkish on foreign policy, pro-free market, and a moderate on fiscal policy.
    Ah-so you're a RINO.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
    Which is a structural problem which is propagated and supported by both sides in a rare demonstration of bipartisan action. If there is one thing both parties can get behind, it's ensuring that they continue to monopolize elections.
    They don't have to propagate or support it. We will have Republicans and Democrats until one or both parties goes the way of the Federalists and Whigs.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
    The parties do not control the balloting system on the federal level, they control it on the State level. That is where the system keeps the main two in and others out.

    Founders had nothing to do with that.
    The two party system originated in Congress.

    There were no parties at the onset of the first Congress. However, Congress quickly segregated into the Administration and Antiadministration parties. Within a short period of time we had Federalists vs. Democratic-Republicans.

    We have never had strong third parties because the system was inadvertently tailored to two parties.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daemon of Decay
    replied
    Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
    The greater problem is that in their efforts to avoid factionalism, the framers of the Constitution created a system which propagated two parties.
    Which is a structural problem which is propagated and supported by both sides in a rare demonstration of bipartisan action. If there is one thing both parties can get behind, it's ensuring that they continue to monopolize elections.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChrisF1987
    replied
    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
    I've never seen Chris as very conservative, much less a GOP supporter.
    Surprise, surprise! I happen to be a registered Republican, been so since I registered to vote in 2006. Centrist on social issues, hawkish on foreign policy, pro-free market, and a moderate on fiscal policy.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arnold J Rimmer
    replied
    Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
    The problem, as T.A. G points out is that those in power rig the playing field in their favor, to the extreme.

    However the main problem is 'fear' voting. Instead of looking at other possible parties and voting for their candidates voters will vote for one of the two main parties because they 'Fear' that the party they disagree with most will win if they don't vote for the other main party. Which BOTH parties count on to a large degree. Just look at the debates here. It's all about creating fear.
    There is also the issue that many Americans who are not party-affiliated are single-issue voters. You see this a great deal in purple states.

    And lets not forget that voter turn-out stays very low, especially in Congressional elections.

    Leave a comment:


  • Combat Engineer
    replied
    Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
    The greater problem is that in their efforts to avoid factionalism, the framers of the Constitution created a system which propagated two parties.
    The parties do not control the balloting system on the federal level, they control it on the State level. That is where the system keeps the main two in and others out.

    Founders had nothing to do with that.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Combat Engineer View Post
    The problem, as T.A. G points out is that those in power rig the playing field in their favor, to the extreme.

    However the main problem is 'fear' voting. Instead of looking at other possible parties and voting for their candidates voters will vote for one of the two main parties because they 'Fear' that the party they disagree with most will win if they don't vote for the other main party. Which BOTH parties count on to a large degree. Just look at the debates here. It's all about creating fear.
    The greater problem is that in their efforts to avoid factionalism, the framers of the Constitution created a system which propagated two parties.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Doctor
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    Always a good tactic, claiming others are dumb, or serving special interest.
    It's a simple fact.

    Leave a comment:


  • Combat Engineer
    replied
    Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
    In many ways. We have to change things with our votes of displeasure of those in power, continue with the same oh, same oh or with blood and with that the destruction of our nation.
    The problem, as T.A. G points out is that those in power rig the playing field in their favor, to the extreme.

    However the main problem is 'fear' voting. Instead of looking at other possible parties and voting for their candidates voters will vote for one of the two main parties because they 'Fear' that the party they disagree with most will win if they don't vote for the other main party. Which BOTH parties count on to a large degree. Just look at the debates here. It's all about creating fear.

    Leave a comment:

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