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21st Century Education

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  • Percy Coburg
    replied
    Originally posted by Persephone View Post
    Most private schools are run by religious institutions.
    Bingo!

    It's unfortunate but it happens. They will make the gay parent go through the process then deny the child. But there are also straight parents that are denied as well, so that it doesn't appear deliberate but it is.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve573
    replied
    Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
    Children's of gay parents..How can they be refused in other schools ?
    Are they listed like "born from people from the same sex "?
    I mean ,are they registered somewhere?
    I cannot believe that your country makes a special status with these child.
    It's not the country making a special status...public schools make no distinction no matter who a child's parents are. Many kids have same-sex parents...but private schools are not necessarily bound by the same rules. The only restrictions I'm aware of in public schools are health department related...kids are required to have certain vaccinations etc. Otherwise I am not aware of any kids being turned away from public school for any reason. I imagine that the only time this becomes an issue even in private schools is those that are run by conservative churches.

    Leave a comment:


  • Persephone
    replied
    Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
    Children's of gay parents..How can they be refused in other schools ?
    Are they listed like "born from people from the same sex "?
    I mean ,are they registered somewhere?
    I cannot believe that your country makes a special status with these child.

    Most private schools are run by religious institutions.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daemon of Decay
    replied
    Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
    Children's of gay parents..How can they be refused in other schools ?
    Are they listed like "born from people from the same sex "?
    I mean ,are they registered somewhere?
    I cannot believe that your country makes a special status with these child.
    Never underestimate the American ability to complicate things for pointless reasons.

    Leave a comment:


  • sebfrench76
    replied
    Originally posted by Percy Coburg View Post
    Most of the parents work in Silicon Valley and had terrible experience finding schools for their children. This school appeals to the Techie parents.

    They also accept children of gay parents.
    Children's of gay parents..How can they be refused in other schools ?
    Are they listed like "born from people from the same sex "?
    I mean ,are they registered somewhere?
    I cannot believe that your country makes a special status with these child.

    Leave a comment:


  • T. A. Gardner
    replied
    Originally posted by Savez View Post
    I have a Masters of Arts in Teaching. It wasn't much different than getting a Masters in any other subject though.
    I don't know in your case. A friend of the wife's is a teacher. When she did her master's (this is at ASU in Phoenix), she'd bring some of the papers she was doing by for me to edit / review.

    I'll be honest. I was stunned by how pathetically bad they were both in research and documentation. She said they usually got her a decent (B or better) grade.
    In math and science she was ill-prepared and in science in particular I was again stunned by how almost illiterate she was on any but the most general topic.

    I know the ones I worked with when I was a VT instructor were poor at math and science too. I often had to come and show them how to do some problem or another, particularly word problems, ones involving lots of variables or fractions, and the like.
    Stunned was the only word for it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Savez
    replied
    Originally posted by holly6 View Post
    TAG,
    Of course no state is going to completely dismantle the Education College in their Universities. However, many are ahead of you with the idea of attracting Professionals into education. In WA it's called an MIT (Masters in Teaching). It is a fast track cohort concept. During the recession it attracted some very worthy individuals particularly in the Math and Sciences. We lost more than a few as the economy began to recover. The program still exists, but the members mainly hold various Sociology and Humanity degrees.
    I have a Masters of Arts in Teaching. It wasn't much different than getting a Masters in any other subject though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mountain Man
    replied
    Originally posted by holly6 View Post
    TAG,
    . The program still exists, but the members mainly hold various Sociology and Humanity degrees.
    IOW, they're Lefty Libbies.

    Leave a comment:


  • holly6
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    Yep, I know that. That is something I think needs to change. Abolish colleges of education entirely and let anyone with a degree teach. I bet some retired engineer would be better at teaching math and science than someone with an arts degree in education would be.
    I'd also bet some one with a journalism or English degree would be better at teaching English to kids.

    If you look at colleges of education today across the US they are often filled with some of the most radical Leftists you can find on a university campus. Their ideas and methods are geared to teaching new teachers how to think correctly politically and indoctrinate their students rather than to creating open minded and educated children.
    TAG,
    Of course no state is going to completely dismantle the Education College in their Universities. However, many are ahead of you with the idea of attracting Professionals into education. In WA it's called an MIT (Masters in Teaching). It is a fast track cohort concept. During the recession it attracted some very worthy individuals particularly in the Math and Sciences. We lost more than a few as the economy began to recover. The program still exists, but the members mainly hold various Sociology and Humanity degrees.

    Leave a comment:


  • jdkeyes1
    replied
    Originally posted by Savez View Post
    I was lucky enough to go to University with a practical approach to education. At most universities (and to some extent the one I attended) the classes do not get you ready for teaching at all.
    Yep. I've known a lot of people to go through the degree and credentialing programs, and I went partway through the credential process before switching fields. A whole lot of busywork and hoop jumping, and not a great deal that was constructive.

    In reality though, the setup (in California at least) requires such tight adherence to the curriculum and standards that there is not a lot of flexibility for actual teaching.

    Leave a comment:


  • Savez
    replied
    Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
    Yep, I know that. That is something I think needs to change. Abolish colleges of education entirely and let anyone with a degree teach. I bet some retired engineer would be better at teaching math and science than someone with an arts degree in education would be.
    I'd also bet some one with a journalism or English degree would be better at teaching English to kids.

    If you look at colleges of education today across the US they are often filled with some of the most radical Leftists you can find on a university campus. Their ideas and methods are geared to teaching new teachers how to think correctly politically and indoctrinate their students rather than to creating open minded and educated children.
    I was lucky enough to go to University with a practical approach to education. At most universities (and to some extent the one I attended) the classes do not get you ready for teaching at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Percy Coburg
    replied
    Most of the parents work in Silicon Valley and had terrible experience finding schools for their children. This school appeals to the Techie parents.

    They also accept children of gay parents.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daemon of Decay
    replied
    Originally posted by Savez View Post
    Only way to be a teacher is through BA degree, private or no. At least in Alabama.
    In Texas that is only true for public school. Private schools can ostensibly hire whoever they like.

    Leave a comment:


  • jdkeyes1
    replied
    Originally posted by Steve573 View Post
    I would also add that schools tend to be way too liberal-minded when it comes to how they treat students. What I mean is that they no longer value or reward achievement...they value equality and self-esteem. Not that those things don't have their place but they've superseded the value of actually being the best at math, English, or whatever subject that used to give kids a feeling of accomplishment. It's very rare for a school to hold a kid back a year because they aren't capable of going to the next grade...they hold them back if they miss way too many days sometimes, or if there are behavioral issues, but never for under-performance or failure to understand the material. Students then go to the next grade level, can't understand the material, slow down the entire class while the teacher tries to keep them up to speed, and everyone suffers.
    All those idiotic 'my child is a star student' bumper stickers are handed out by turns in many schools, so that each kid gets one during the school year so their self esteem doesn't suffer. It makes the award meaningless...like the 100 meter dash at the special olympics. Everyone gets a medal but who really wins? What's the point of training, practicing, or improving if everyone gets the same reward in the end? Kids know that and the ones who might be capable of achieving something just don't see why it matters anymore, so not as many of them are willing to put in the extra work.
    Schools like this one are not the answer because they're exclusive...we have schools, we have teacher, and we have books, technology and other things needed to educate...we just need to change the mindset of educators in general to teach, encourage, reward accomplishment, and discourage failure by having meaningful consequences.
    In much of this, schools are merely a reflection of the society and culture which they are serving. Believe me, nobody would rather see us reward and celebrate achievement, and enforce accountability of students to knowing the material and completing the work, than teachers. Public education is handcuffed partially by its system and bureaucracy, but also in large part because society has expected them to be the sole educational (and, in some cases, parental) influence in a child's life. Schools and districts have also been litigated into submission on any point in which they strive to hold students to a reasonable standard or level of expectation.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daemon of Decay
    replied
    Originally posted by jdkeyes1 View Post
    Or English-language learners, or socio-economically challenged families, or students who are far below basic skill levels, or...?

    Being a public school employee, I won't object to many of the criticisms leveled at public education, however, when you're working under a governmental mandate that ALL students have the right to an equal educational experience, the noble sentiments of education expressed in the article come crashing back to reality.

    It's hard to look at a situation where you appear to have rather affluent students and parents who are undoubtedly involved (they wouldn't put their kids in a place like that if they weren't serious about education) and draw any meaningful conclusions or applications that can be applied to the greater public.

    FWIW, there is no school that a 7-year old would attend in California that would come close to have 38 students (high 20s at the most), and the "endless bubble-filled tests" took most of our classes (only grades 3-5 were taking it this year) less than a week to complete with the new computerized adapting-difficulty tests.
    That's one of the biggest issues whenever comparing private to public schools, because with the number of students public schools have to educate and accommodate it becomes a case of apples and oranges.

    Leave a comment:

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