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Study of Common Core in early adopting Kentucky indicates some success

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  • Study of Common Core in early adopting Kentucky indicates some success

    This study provides a first look at how student college- and career-readiness have progressed in the early years of Common Core implementation. It is motivated by concern that changes triggered by the standards transition might be disruptive to student learning in the short run, even when those changes may become beneficial once fully implemented.

    Using longitudinal administrative data from Kentucky, an early adopter of the CCSS, we followed three cohorts of students from the end of the 8th grade to the end of the 11th grade and found that students exposed to the CCSS—including students in both high- and low-poverty schools—made faster progress in learning than similar students who were not exposed to the standards. Although it is not conclusive whether cross-cohort improvement was entirely attributable to the standards reform, we found that students made large gains in proficiency in the years immediately before and after the transition. Additionally, we found student performance in subjects that adopted CCSS-aligned curriculum framework experienced larger, more immediate improvement than student performance in subjects that carried over last-generation curriculum framework.
    http://www.air.org/resource/getting-...tate-standards

    Was all of the panicked scare talk wrong?
    Homo homini lupus

  • #2
    They better fix the software problem before states start to bail on Common Core.

    Must be the same people who handled the Obamacare rollout.
    "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

    Comment


    • #3
      I get the impression that the American Institute for Research is a Progressive funded and backed organization that is likely to have a biased opinion on subject matter they research.
      It appears they could be largely funded by people like George Soros who regularly piles money into Progressive causes.

      If I'm wrong, okay. But, right now it looks that way as far as AIR goes. That would make them heavily biased in favor of Common Core.

      Comment


      • #4
        I think Common Core might be ok for the upper grades but some of the math in the lower grades just don't make sense. I'm willing to bet that those 8th graders already knew their multiplication tables before they started being monitored. Study the next group of 8th graders til 11th grade and I bet they don't get the same result. But its all for naught. The problems in schools is not the curriculum. Its the lack of discipline.
        “I do not wish to have the slave emancipated because I love him, but because I hate his master."
        --Salmon P. Chase

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        • #5
          And that lack of discipline, regarding which I certainly agree with you, is a result of too many unqualified and incompetent administrators (principals and assistant principals).

          The short rule is-strong administrators, good school; poor administrators, poor school.

          They treat teachers like 3d class citizens and consequently, the students suffer.

          And the manner in which the curriculum is implemented is also a problem. The curriculum is merely a guide. How it is taught should be up to the teacher. With the implementation of Common Core, a lot of discretion on how to teach was taken away.

          Sincerely,
          M
          We are not now that strength which in old days
          Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
          Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
          To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

          Comment


          • #6
            From the OP:

            "found that students exposed to the CCSS—including students in both high- and low-poverty schools—made faster progress in learning than similar students who were not exposed to the standards."

            The foundation of CCSS is rote learning, yes the kids that have been going through route learning will progress faster on the standardized tests. This is okay if you are trying to produce a generation of assembly line workers but in the dynamic ever changing society of today, it is a dead end.

            The best example that I can give is a military one.

            We love acronyms.....we will acronym everything that we can because it 'makes it easier to learn'

            With that said, let me introduce the 5 paragraph order. It is designed to complete any mission/task/job that one is given in the military. It can be as complicated as a multi division operation order or as simplistic as a trash detail picking up litter.

            The acronym used is SMEAC:

            Situation
            Mission
            Enemy
            Admin & logistics
            Command & signal

            You could walk up to most service members and ask them what the 5 paragraph order is and they will break it down to what is above. Ask them where higher, adjacent, & supporting fall under and most will just repeat the rote memory Situation, Mission.......

            This works fine for following orders as long as the person giving the order is capable of critical thinking. If someone that doesn't critically think delivers a SMEAC, things fall apart very quickly upon first contact whether it be the enemy or the garbage bags needed for the litter.

            The common core kids aren't learning, they are reciting.
            "I don't discuss sitting presidents," Mattis tells NPR in an interview. "I believe that you owe a period of quiet."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Jannie View Post
              http://www.air.org/resource/getting-...tate-standards

              Was all of the panicked scare talk wrong?
              To what 'panicked scare talk' are you referring?

              If you actually are interested in the education 'situation' regarding common core, I suggest you look up Diane Ravitch and visit her blog at:
              http://dianeravitch.net/

              She has written excellent books on education, is an education historian and has worked in both Republican and Democrat administrations regarding education.

              She knows her stuff, used common sense, and understands what the current problems in education in the US are.

              Sincerely,
              M
              We are not now that strength which in old days
              Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
              Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
              To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

              Comment


              • #8
                ...longitudinal administrative data...
                Meaning what? Would latitudinal data have been better?

                Comment


                • #9
                  It also strikes me that this "study" sounds eerily similar to ones from this program, that I do have considerable familiarity with:

                  http://www.tusd1.org/contents/depart...anam/index.asp

                  That program (and I'm not saying that AIR is) was and is chock full of hard Leftists. They regularly trotted out "data" and "studies" saying things that sound very similar to the Kentucky study but were literally pulled out of their @$$. There was no underlying actual data to prove any of their claims. They made the results up.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Massena View Post
                    And that lack of discipline, regarding which I certainly agree with you, is a result of too many unqualified and incompetent administrators (principals and assistant principals).
                    True, there are plenty of incompetent administrators. But that is ancillary to the true cause for the woeful lack of discipline in today's public schools. Teachers and administrators have both hands tied behind their backs when attempting to enforce discipline, and the students know it. There are no real ramifications to bad behavior, none which serve as a deterrent to those students only in school because someone makes them attend.

                    You want to increase the effectiveness of the public school system, dump this idiotic ideal of no child left behind. Admit there are kids who want to be left behind, who could care less about an education and their only objective in school is to disrupt and destroy the opportunity for those students who do want an education from getting one.

                    Open the front doors and announce anyone who wants to go can go. Tell them if they survive to see the day they realize they made a mistake they can come back and go to night school. But for now if you don't want to be here get the frak out. Then lock the doors and concentrate on those still sitting in their seats.

                    This would, of course, force parents to take some charge of their kids, so some would immediately be forced back. But the idiots with no business in school would be idiots somewhere else.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Martok View Post
                      True, there are plenty of incompetent administrators. But that is ancillary to the true cause for the woeful lack of discipline in today's public schools. Teachers and administrators have both hands tied behind their backs when attempting to enforce discipline, and the students know it. There are no real ramifications to bad behavior, none which serve as a deterrent to those students only in school because someone makes them attend.

                      You want to increase the effectiveness of the public school system, dump this idiotic ideal of no child left behind. Admit there are kids who want to be left behind, who could care less about an education and their only objective in school is to disrupt and destroy the opportunity for those students who do want an education from getting one.

                      Open the front doors and announce anyone who wants to go can go. Tell them if they survive to see the day they realize they made a mistake they can come back and go to night school. But for now if you don't want to be here get the frak out. Then lock the doors and concentrate on those still sitting in their seats.

                      This would, of course, force parents to take some charge of their kids, so some would immediately be forced back. But the idiots with no business in school would be idiots somewhere else.
                      I have found in my teaching experience that it comes from the administrators who will hire weak teachers because that's what they want.

                      I worked for two strong, determined, intelligent principals (and three who were weak) and the two schools that they ran were well-run and disciplined.

                      The boss makes all the difference, good school or not.

                      Sincerely,
                      M
                      We are not now that strength which in old days
                      Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                      Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                      To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here's an interesting article...

                        http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/17/op...?emc=eta1&_r=1

                        Sincerely,
                        M
                        We are not now that strength which in old days
                        Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts
                        Made weak by time and fate but strong in will
                        To strive to seek to find and not to yield.

                        Comment

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