Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What If...The Government Is Afraid Of Freedom?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
    Then it should have been that agency that made the move.
    (if the above is even true)
    What give the Hussein the authority to do that?
    ATF is an enforcement agency; like the DEA it has very specific regulatory authority, but that is simply to enforce the Federal Code's provisions as pertains to the commercial transfer of firearms, certain accessories, explosives, and interstate transfer of alcohol. It cannot 'ban' anything.

    In short, wrong agency.

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
      In short, wrong agency.
      Exactly.
      The right agency to make laws is Congress, not unelected bureaucrats like the ATF or the FCC or the EPA.

      But since the blow-out in the last election, the Hussein is going all-out for this Lame-Dick phase of his regime'.
      Must we let him get away with it?
      "Why is the Rum gone?"

      -Captain Jack

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
        Exactly.
        The right agency to make laws is Congress, not unelected bureaucrats like the ATF or the FCC or the EPA.

        But since the blow-out in the last election, the Hussein is going all-out for this Lame-Dick phase of his regime'.
        Must we let him get away with it?
        Congress is not an agency, its a branch.

        Executive Orders are common to every Prez. They're temporary, so its no big deal.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
          ATF is an enforcement agency; like the DEA it has very specific regulatory authority, but that is simply to enforce the Federal Code's provisions as pertains to the commercial transfer of firearms, certain accessories, explosives, and interstate transfer of alcohol. It cannot 'ban' anything.

          In short, wrong agency.
          The myriad bureaus, agencies and services that comprise the Federal bureaucracy have a great deal of latitude in how they interpret and execute the laws.

          In 2009, the EP Agency gave itself the authority to regulate greenhouse gasses based on a new interpretation of a 30+ year old law. This was the work of EP Agency lawyers and bureaucrats.

          This year, the Bureau of ATF reclassified certain types of popular rifle "ammunition containing a steel core" as armor-piercing pistol ammunition for the purpose of banning them. This was the work of Bureau of ATF lawyers and bureaucrats.
          Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
            Congress is not an agency, its a branch.

            Executive Orders are common to every Prez. They're temporary, so its no big deal.
            1- then they should start proving it.

            2- a lot of damage can be done in 2 years
            "Why is the Rum gone?"

            -Captain Jack

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
              The myriad bureaus, agencies and services that comprise the Federal bureaucracy have a great deal of latitude in how they interpret and execute the laws.

              In 2009, the EP Agency gave itself the authority to regulate greenhouse gasses based on a new interpretation of a 30+ year old law. This was the work of EP Agency lawyers and bureaucrats.

              This year, the Bureau of ATF reclassified certain types of popular rifle "ammunition containing a steel core" as armor-piercing pistol ammunition for the purpose of banning them. This was the work of Bureau of ATF lawyers and bureaucrats.
              It didn't ban them, it changed their classification, which brought them under an existing ban.

              Whether this is upheld by the courts is another matter.

              This sort of thing goes back to the President; his appointees are supposed to be watching the shop.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                1- then they should start proving it.

                2- a lot of damage can be done in 2 years
                Temporary damage, sure. Exec Orders aren't statute.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                  Congress is not an agency, its a branch.

                  Executive Orders are common to every Prez. They're temporary, so its no big deal.
                  These are not Executive Orders. They are new regulations imposed by the Executive Branch without congressional action. They are easier to undo than laws are; however, they are rarely undone...






                  http://www.heritage.org/research/rep...tory-expansion
                  Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                    It didn't ban them, it changed their classification, which brought them under an existing ban.

                    Whether this is upheld by the courts is another matter.

                    This sort of thing goes back to the President; his appointees are supposed to be watching the shop.
                    The problem isn't just his appointees. The Bureaucracy has in many ways become a 4th branch of government, un-elected and at best only tangentially accountable to the President.
                    Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                      1- then they should start proving it.
                      But... but... They will be criticized.

                      Originally posted by The Exorcist
                      2- a lot of damage can be done in 2 years
                      A lot of damage can be done with a "pen and a phone."
                      Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                        The problem isn't just his appointees. The Bureaucracy has in many ways become a 4th branch of government, un-elected and at best only tangentially accountable to the President.
                        True.

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          The way to fix Obama the Ignorant's and those before him damage to the executive branch by regulatory overreach is relatively simple:

                          Elect a President that is willing to order the executive branch to really do something they haven't done before.

                          That is, reduce the regulatory burden. Every President signs some executive order requiring all agencies to eliminate redundant, obsolete, and such regulations to make their agency more efficient. Obama the Ignorant signed one of these too.
                          The problem is the order is effectively ignored because there are no consequences to it.
                          So, you get a President to establish actual requirements and consequences. That is he makes an executive order that requires all agencies of the executive branch to eliminate by page count in the federal register 10% or 5% or whatever of their current regulations within one calendar year or face a reduction in their budget equal to the amount by which they miss the target.
                          Add that this doesn't preclude their making new regulations, or enforcing or doing all the stuff they are supposed to do. It just means the regulations they are doing it with have to take up fewer pages.
                          That will eliminate duplication, obsolescence, and stupid rules. It will streamline things.
                          Repeat for four years. Build an culture in government that says, do we really need this complex a rule? How can we simplify things? For example, the IRS has about 15,000 pages of rules right now. Eliminating 750 to 1500 pages of rules would have a dramatic affect on tax law.

                          Get Congress to pass a law that requires all agencies to establish a means to accurately and correctly inform the public and those affected by their rules what those rules are and put penalties on those agencies for mistakes, wrong information, or otherwise not dealing openly, honestly, and fairly with the public. This might include automatic punitive action against employees that make mistakes that cause real injury or damage to a person or business. Making agencies libel for their mistakes. Putting burden of proof on the government in every instance.
                          Build a culture of real fear in the civil service to making mistakes or blunders.

                          Last edited by T. A. Gardner; 27 Feb 15, 15:45.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                            Get Congress to pass a law that requires all agencies to establish a means to accurately and correctly inform the public and those affected by their rules what those rules are and put penalties on those agencies for mistakes, wrong information, or otherwise not dealing openly, honestly, and fairly with the public.
                            Already in place, have been for years.

                            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                            This might include automatic punitive action against employees that make mistakes that cause real injury or damage to a person or business.
                            Violates their civil rights. Baby and bathwater situation.

                            Assessing culpability in a organizational setting is extraordinarily difficult.

                            And who is doing the investigations needed to prosecute these actions? More Federal bureaucrats living in a 'culture of fear'?

                            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                            Making agencies libel for their mistakes. Putting burden of proof on the government in every instance.
                            Build a culture of real fear in the civil service to making mistakes or blunders.
                            How do you make an agency liable? Cut its budget? That means nothing.

                            The Bill of Rights stands squarely in your way in this matter. You cannot discriminate against nor deny their rights to citizens based upon their employment.

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                              Congress is not an agency, its a branch.

                              Executive Orders are common to every Prez. They're temporary, so its no big deal.
                              Not so. They are permanent unless revoked, and they establish a precedent upon which successors expand and build, in this case, in the wrong direction. Our currewnt loss of civil rights is a prime example of EO's that should never have been enacted.

                              EO's which circumvent Congress and the Constitution, let alone Federal laws, are a bad idea no matter why they are written.

                              I think of politics, and particularly the presidency, as primarily a salemanship job. If the idea can't be sold to Congress and the Senate, let alone to the American people, it should never be put into an Executive Order.

                              EO's are for those occasions when speed is off the essence and there is no time for lengthy procedures often needed for Congress and the Senate to act, such as a national emergency. They are not intended to replace the system or to be used to go around it.
                              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X