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  • The Melting Arctic

    Yet how to reconcile the environmental risks of the melting Arctic with the economic opportunities it will present? The shrinkage of the sea ice is no less a result of human hands than the ploughing of the prairies. It might even turn out as lucrative. But the costs will also be huge. Unique ecosystems, and perhaps many species, will be lost in a tide of environmental change. The cause is global pollution, and the risks it carries are likewise global. The Arctic, no longer distant or inviolable, has emerged, almost overnight, as a powerful symbol of the age of man.

    http://www.economist.com/node/21556798
    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

  • #2
    It largely depends on politics. If the Environmentalism of the Left has its way global economies and societies will suffer considerably for their desire to "save the planet."

    Solar and wind will wreak havoc on economics by dramatically raising energy costs. The restrictions on resource exploitation and use will also cause massive price increases in most goods, including food, and result in a stagnation or decline in quality of life for most people.

    Environmentalism for example has caused millions of deaths from malaria and other mosquito borne diseases by the banning of pesticides. The original research on DDT and bird eggshell thickness has finally been proven nothing more than concocted lies.

    http://www.21stcenturysciencetech.co...02/Carson.html

    For the Left the use of a convenient lie to gain a desired end seems all-too-often perfectly acceptable. It doesn't matter how many lives are destroyed in the process as the ends justify the means for them.

    Comment


    • #3
      Only the ice isn't melting, at least not permanently.
      “I do not wish to have the slave emancipated because I love him, but because I hate his master."
      --Salmon P. Chase

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Savez View Post
        Only the ice isn't melting, at least not permanently.
        Funny how they never mention that when there is less ice in the Arctic, there is more ice in the Antarctic.

        But hey, why not spam the board with this junk when the Left it getting punked on every other issue?

        Comment


        • #5
          The Arctic sea ice is actually growing the past couple of years, not shrinking. It will be bad news for the Polar Bears that will starve when there is no open water for the seals, their main food source.

          More junk science like the glaciers on Iceland melting will cause more volcanic activity?

          Iceland sits in the middle of the Mid Ocean Rift where it is being pulled apart several inches a year. What fills that void? Lava from down below that makes it one of the most volcanic active regions on the Earth. The melting? directly caused by all that hot lava coming up under the ice, Which it has done for millions of years.

          As a side note, nearly all of Iceland's energy generation, including heating, comes from Geothermal sources.
          “Breaking News,”

          “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
            The Arctic sea ice is actually growing the past couple of years, not shrinking. It will be bad news for the Polar Bears that will starve when there is no open water for the seals, their main food source.

            More junk science like the glaciers on Iceland melting will cause more volcanic activity?

            Iceland sits in the middle of the Mid Ocean Rift where it is being pulled apart several inches a year. What fills that void? Lava from down below that makes it one of the most volcanic active regions on the Earth. The melting? directly caused by all that hot lava coming up under the ice, Which it has done for millions of years.

            As a side note, nearly all of Iceland's energy generation, including heating, comes from Geothermal sources.
            The present day Arctic sea ice extent is abnormally high relative to the rest of the Holocene (last 10,000 yrs).

            From 10,000 to 6,000 years ago (Holocene Climatic Optimum), Arctic seas were routinely ice-free during summers.



            The current interglacial stage peaked during the Holocene Climatic Optimum (~7900 years ago).

            The period from which we have warmed since 1600 AD was one of the coldest phases of the Holocene...



            It can be demonstrated that the Greenland Sea area was consistent with McKay's observation of the Chukchi Sea. The Arctic was just as warm in the 1930's and Medieval Warm Period as it is today...



            Inuit have dealt with cyclical climate changes for more than 10,000 years. Periods of cooling were far more detrimental than warming. Polar bears (not really a unique species) weathered far warmer interglacial stages than the current one.

            The supposedly unprecedented opening sea routes were routinely open as recently as the 1930's. As they were during the Medieval Warm Period.

            The Arctic, like the rest of Earth's climate isn't changing any differently today than it has routinely and naturally changed over the past 10,000 years.
            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

            Comment


            • #7
              SteAdy on, lads....

              The link is to a one page article in....THE ECONOMIST...

              No need for Panic....
              The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

              Comment


              • #8
                Arctic Salmon fishery

                It is now widely accepted, for example, that all five species of Pacific salmon have successfully spawned in rivers on Alaska’s north coast. Those rivers were until relatively recently thought to beyond the natural range of the species and they appear to have already provided a jumping off point for salmon incursions deeper into the Arctic. DNA testing is underway to test that theory.

                Although researchers have yet to find any active spawning beds in the Canadian Arctic, breeding populations of chum and pink salmon are thought to exist in the Mackenzie River, which flows from Great Slave Lake, through Canada’s Northwest Territories to the Beaufort Sea, near Inuvik.


                http://ariverneversleeps.com/arctic-salmon/
                The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by marktwain View Post
                  It is now widely accepted, for example, that all five species of Pacific salmon have successfully spawned in rivers on Alaska’s north coast. Those rivers were until relatively recently thought to beyond the natural range of the species and they appear to have already provided a jumping off point for salmon incursions deeper into the Arctic. DNA testing is underway to test that theory.

                  Although researchers have yet to find any active spawning beds in the Canadian Arctic, breeding populations of chum and pink salmon are thought to exist in the Mackenzie River, which flows from Great Slave Lake, through Canada’s Northwest Territories to the Beaufort Sea, near Inuvik.


                  http://ariverneversleeps.com/arctic-salmon/
                  Truly shocking! Fish adapting to climate change? Unfrackingbelievable.
                  Small-scale climatic changes continued to occur after the disappearance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, as shown in Figure 3. These changes have been linked to a number of biological transformations, or shifts, in biota and communities. Between the 9th and 14th century (~1400 years ago) there was a “Medieval Warm Period”, when the average temperature in the Northern Hemisphere reached its highest point in the past 4,000 years, which was only about 1°C higher than at present (16). It has been documented that during this period, American oysters (Crassostrea virginica) and bay scallops (Aequipecten irradiens) formed populations as far north as Sable Island (13). Neither of these species exists there today. Radiocarbon dating of relict oyster and bay scallop shells compare reasonably well with the dates of the post-glacial warm period (13). From the 16th to the 19th century there was a “Little Ice Age”, when the average temperature of the Northern Hemisphere was a degree or two cooler than now (16). It is during this time that salmon are hypothesized to have relocated to the New England area. Salmon may have migrated from Europe after the end of the Pleistocene, across the Atlantic. Immediately prior to the Little Ice Age, the Medieval Warm Period diminished sea pack ice around Iceland and Greenland (18). It is possible that salmon migrated during this time to Davis Strait between Labrador and Greenland (Fig. 4), an area that today is still an important feeding ground for both European and American salmon populations. This allowed them to reach North American shores. As the Medieval Warming Period came to a close and the Little Ice Age set in, cooler conditions south of the Labrador coast initiated salmon range expansion into the New England region (18).

                  http://www.gulfofmaine-census.org/ab...logic-history/

                  Last edited by The Doctor; 08 Feb 15, 10:13.
                  Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    http://voices.nationalgeographic.com...-a-polar-bear/

                    Polar bears are being replaced by the Grizzly in the Canadian arctic. One reason is the Grizzly will take advantage of spring salmon runs for early season nutrient.

                    This should allow for the re- establishment of Barrens grounds Grizzly's in the Ungava, as salmon runs are crucial for female and cub survival.

                    http://nwtspeciesatrisk.ca/en/species/grizzly-bear
                    Last edited by marktwain; 08 Feb 15, 10:48.
                    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                      Funny how they never mention that when there is less ice in the Arctic, there is more ice in the Antarctic.

                      But hey, why not spam the board with this junk when the Left it getting punked on every other issue?

                      Some might believe what you post. I always take it in question. You do have a source for your opinion, like a link or something.
                      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by marktwain View Post
                        http://voices.nationalgeographic.com...-a-polar-bear/

                        Polar bears are being replaced by the Grizzly in the Canadian arctic. One reason is the Grizzly will take advantage of spring salmon runs for early season nutrient.

                        This should allow for the re- establishment of Barrens grounds Grizzly's in the Ungava, as salmon runs are crucial for female and cub survival.

                        http://nwtspeciesatrisk.ca/en/species/grizzly-bear
                        Polar bears are essentially white grizzly bears... Setting aside the fatally flawed premise that Arctic Sea ice is vanishing and ignoring the fact that Polar Bears sailed right on through the much warmer Holocene Climatic Optimum... If Polar Bears and Grizzlies can interbreed, producing genetically viable offspring, they are of the same species. Therefore, as long as Grizzlies, Kodiaks and other brown bears live, Polar Bears, as a species, cannot go extinct.

                        The traditional definition of "species" as applied to sexually reproducing animals is: If two animals can mate and produce genetically viable offspring, they are of the same species.

                        A horse and a donkey can mate and produce a mule; which normally cannot reproduce. A mule is not genetically viable. Therefore horses and donkeys are separate species.

                        A Collie and a Dachshund can mate and produce a really odd looking dog; which can reproduce. Collies and Dachshunds are of the same species.

                        Using the traditional definition, Polar Bears and Grizzlies are of the same species.

                        The modern, revisionist definition of species is: If two organisms would not normally mate and produce offspring; they are of separate species. Using the modern, junk science definition. Roseanne Barr is of a different species than 99.9999% of all human males.

                        The "experts" classified Polar Bears as a unique species because they looked and acted different than Brown Bears. This was a mistake...

                        The Brown Bear: Father of the Polar Bear?


                        Article #1314

                        by Ned Rozell



                        --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


                        This article is provided as a public service by the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, in cooperation with the UAF research community. Ned Rozell is a science writer at the institute.

                        There's something different about the brown bears of Southeast Alaska's ABC islands.

                        They look like your average Alaska grizzly: milk-chocolate colored fur, a humped back, and a size and reputation that gives humans something to fear when walking the wilds of Alaska.

                        The difference in the brown bears of the ABC (Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof) islands isn't visible. It's in their DNA. Researchers found the bears are more closely related to polar bears than they are to other brown bears.

                        The bears' baffling background was discovered when Gerald Shields and Sandra Talbot of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Institute of Arctic Biology began analyzing the DNA of brown bears from around the world. Talbot, a graduate student, extracted DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, the genetic information warehouse in the chromosomes of every living cell) from hundreds of Alaska brown bears. Starting with slivers of kidney or muscle tissue attained from hunting guides, Talbot used a process called polymerase chain reaction to copy tiny fragments of DNA millions of times.

                        When the DNA was in a readable form, Shields, a molecular evolutionary biologist, saw the DNA from brown bears on the ABC islands brown bears was unique when compared to brown bears anywhere else on the planet. Their closest relative is an unlikely one--the polar bear.

                        A polar bear's white coat, meat-only diet, and preference to live near and on sea ice make it hard to mistake for a brown bear. But Alaska's two largest bear species are closely related--so closely that brown and polar bears have mated in zoos and the union has resulted in fertile offspring. According to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's "Wildlife Notebook Series," both types of bear had a common ancestor that was neither brown nor polar bear. As each adapted to different environments, the bears developed enough unique characteristics that they looked and acted like separate species.

                        With DNA evidence, Shields and his colleagues have launched a new hypothesis--brown bears may have appeared first; polar bears may have arisen from brown bears that wandered north and, over thousands of years, began to sprout white fur and teeth that were better for ripping apart seals than munching berries.

                        [...]

                        LINK

                        Polar Bears probably evolved as a distinct subspecies of Brown Bears because a group of Sangamonian (Eemian) brown bears headed north during warm phases of the last interglacial, just like these Grizzlies are...
                        Grizzly Bears on Ice
                        At the northern edge of the species' range, a growing number of grizzlies are eking out a living in territory traditionally dominated by polar bears

                        02-01-2006 // Ed Struzik

                        ABOUT 50 MILES NORTH of tree line in Canada's western Arctic, Andrew Derocher picked up the tracks of four grizzly bears following a herd of caribou across hard snow and ice toward the coast. Derocher, a University of Alberta biologist, wasn't sure whether the tracks had been left by a family or by a male following a female with two cubs. If it turned out to be the latter, he said, the mother and offspring could be in trouble. Contrary to what may appear in popular movies and books, a lone male grizzly is more likely to kill and eat bear cubs than befriend them.

                        [...]

                        Barren ground grizzlies are among the most enigmatic of Arctic mammals. Few in number and rarely seen, they are as much myth as reality.

                        [...]

                        What grizzlies are actually doing up there in the kingdom of their great white cousins is not clearly understood. Biologists have long considered the differences between the two bears significant enough to warrant separate species status. Physical distinctions are obvious: Polar bears are white rather than brown, which helps camouflage the predators from their prey on the sea ice. They are also generally larger, and have heads and bodies that are much more elongated, and therefore better adapted to penetrate seal lairs. Their larger, sharper teeth allow them to tear up seals efficiently, and shorter claws and larger feet make it easier for polar bears to travel on sea ice and swim across great expanses of water.

                        Many Eskimos believe that rising temperatures in the Arctic explain why grizzly bears--as well as marten, wolverines and several other species of birds and mammals--are showing up in extreme northern places where they were rarely, if ever, seen before. Global warming, they say, is creating conditions that are more favorable for these animals, at least in the short term.

                        While most scientists see that idea as a genuine possibility, experts like Canadian Wildlife Service biologist Ian Stirling, who has studied polar bears for more than 30 years, suspects that some grizzlies have always been venturing onto the ice. Perhaps, Stirling says, "what we're witnessing today is behavior similar to the evolutionary process that resulted in polar bears filling a rich but vacant niche as supreme predator of the sea ice."

                        [...]

                        Link


                        If Polar Bears and Grizzlies are different species, then Chihuahuas and Siberian Huskies are different species.

                        If you look at Fig. 1 of Miller et al., 2006, you'll see that Polar Bears fit right into Clade 2 with the ABC Islands Brown Bears (ursus arctos sitkensis). Barnes et al., 2002 featured a similar diagram that included fossil subspecies of ursus arctos; once again, Polar Bears fit right into ursus arctos...



                        CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

                        There has never been any scientific basis to categorize Polar Bears as a distinct species. It is clearly a subspecies of ursus arctos.
                        Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
                          Some might believe what you post. I always take it in question. You do have a source for your opinion, like a link or something.
                          Red = Antarctic
                          Green = Arctic



                          http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/nsi...n:120/every:12
                          Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                          • #14
                            For the graphically impaired...

                            http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/.../#.VNeyjhl6iBY
                            Watts Up With That? | The world's most viewed site on global warming and climate change.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
                              Some might believe what you post. I always take it in question. You do have a source for your opinion, like a link or something.
                              NASA And NOAA have a tremendous amount of resources.
                              The Antarctic sea ice covers marginally more area- but is thinner than before

                              http://cpo.noaa.gov/warmingworld/snow.html

                              Meanwhile , heat anomalies in some areas are very pronounced. The Ontario clay belt has warmed by 30 per cent over thirty years- consistently. The area has gone form Bussh swamp and marginal pastures to massive farms.
                              Attached Files
                              The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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