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  • #16
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Such an app is inevitable, given the large number of government agencies and their "apps" that track everything an innocent citizen does 24/7.

    It won't take long for the software to catch up - a single keysatro0ke to tell your cellphone that a LEO is present that will send an auto GPS signal to the tracking app - and citizens will be on a level playing field.

    Parents, after all, can already use a cellphone to track their children. No reason why citizens can't use theirs to track the officers who are supposed to be protecting them who themselves are using huge amounts of surveillance.


    I like the poetic justice of this.
    That's already illegal in many states, and prohibited by the FCC.

    Since 9/11 the Feds have moved very strongly to bar any effort to track ES personnel and services. That was one reason while the FCC is requiring all ES agencies to move to the high-freq digital systems: so the traditional scanners will no longer be able to monitor ES freqs. Scrambling is much easier and secure with digital units.
    Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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    • #17
      If the Constitution is being suspended for law abiding citizens, it can also be suspended for law enforcement and everybody else.

      The surveillance, after all, is being done with our tax dollars, so we get as say in who get surveilled.

      That's my viewpoint. Want to watch me 24/7? Well, I really want to watch you.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
        If the Constitution is being suspended for law abiding citizens, it can also be suspended for law enforcement and everybody else.

        The surveillance, after all, is being done with our tax dollars, so we get as say in who get surveilled.

        That's my viewpoint. Want to watch me 24/7? Well, I really want to watch you.
        Well, obviously you do-it would be the closest you would ever get to greatness.

        However, you can't.

        The Constitution hasn't been suspended. It provides for 'reasonable privacy', and the courts get to decide what is reasonable. You may not like it, but there it is.

        When, in the countless decades in which you have wandered this Earth has paying taxes equated the ability to decide how they are spent? While I'm only half your age (I'm only in my early fifties), I've never seen such a time...
        Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
          So long as it is just onlookers posting locations its nothing. If the officer is mobile the data is obsolete within seconds. I don't much care for stationary radar in any case.
          The CHP in the SF bay area are very predictable. I see them in the same spots. They move around but I know their usual hiding places.



          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
          The key to this app is that it doesn't list the locations of police officers, it lists where people claim they've seen them.
          The app for my area is pretty darn close to real-time. We have a lot of people that have nothing better to do while sitting in traffic.
          "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

          "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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          • #20
            I use WAZE regularly.

            When a police car is located, there is little specific information posted. It pretty much tells you the area where you must watch your speed. It does not tell you exactly where the police car is located. DEpending on circumstances the location on the system could be half a mile away from where the cop is sitting.

            And if the cop moves, the information isn't updated unless or until another driver advises the system there he was unable to see the police in that location. In lightly traveled areas, that could take days.

            While anything is possible, I think this would be a pretty inefficient way to stalk police.
            Avatar is General Gerard, courtesy of Zouave.

            Churchill to Chamberlain: you had a choice between war and dishonor. You chose dishonor, and you will have war.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Persephone View Post
              The CHP in the SF bay area are very predictable. I see them in the same spots. They move around but I know their usual hiding places.
              Well, the technical and safety requirements of stationary radar limit the number of places one can operate from.

              Originally posted by Persephone View Post
              The app for my area is pretty darn close to real-time. We have a lot of people that have nothing better to do while sitting in traffic.
              Sure, for traffic cops. Its when people start trying to track patrol units that there comes a problem. Burglars, muggers, and countless other criminal endeavors would love to know where the police are.
              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                Sure, for traffic cops. Its when people start trying to track patrol units that there comes a problem. Burglars, muggers, and countless other criminal endeavors would love to know where the police are.

                That's what the app is for...get around traffic. People update where the slow downs spots are. In addition, they added the feature to update CHP hot spots. When the CHP became aware of it, they demanded Google take down that new feature.

                So far...I have not heard of patrol units being tracked, just traffic cops. If you ask me, I don't think it's a good idea for civilians to track anyone in LE. It just doesn't seem right. I don't use the app so it doesn't affect me at all either way.
                "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                  That's what the app is for...get around traffic. People update where the slow downs spots are. In addition, they added the feature to update CHP hot spots. When the CHP became aware of it, they demanded Google take down that new feature.

                  So far...I have not heard of patrol units being tracked, just traffic cops. If you ask me, I don't think it's a good idea for civilians to track anyone in LE. It just doesn't seem right. I don't use the app so it doesn't affect me at all either way.
                  Burglars and other street-level criminal would live such an app.

                  AAA used to provide maps noting speed traps across the nation.

                  Its no big secret, really: to run stationary radar you need a place where approaching drivers have recently passed a speed sign (judges love that), a spot with a clear view, enough room to safely park your vehicle, plenty of visibility in both directions so you can enter traffic safely, and safe places to effect a stop in the direction the units are moving.

                  Me, as a supervisor, I hate stationary traffic enforcement. I think it is a poor use of resources, all the more so because automated systems do the same job much more effectively.
                  Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                  • #24
                    Back in the days long before cell phones, when the CB craze got started, several local teens set up a game to track a "Local Yokel." They took turns following him and reporting on the location. They were soon busted when he called dispatch on his own radio with the perps getting pulled over by the backup. (CB channels were being monitored by law enforcement.)

                    Given today's dangerous world made more dangerous by the actions of "The Democratic Socialist occupying the Oval Office," such an app needs to be either banned, or the provider held responsible for the action of those that would use that app to kill police officers as what happened in NYC a month ago.
                    “Breaking News,”

                    “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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                    • #25
                      When I saw the thread title I thought someone had divided a way of tapping into transponder devices fitted to police cars. Using it like what my wife calls the husband tracker on my Garmin.
                      If it just relies on voltunteers calling in the it can't be up to much.
                      "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                      • #26
                        It might make police officers more vulnerable to ambushes but those are comparatively rare. I see this like people that have police scanners. Police departments hate these. But, in the US individuals are legally and constitutionally entitled to listen in if the police are broadcasting.
                        There's a web site listing where you can find "Secret" spy satellites.

                        http://www.space-travel.com/reports/...lites_999.html

                        The government can't stop that either.

                        Police operate in public. If someone wants to post up a list of where they are on the internet, then that's their right to waste their time in that fashion.


                        Most criminals are pretty stupid. Its refreshing to run across a smart one.
                        That is an understatement! Criminals are dumber than a bucket of cement. The good ones, and the smart ones, rarely get caught and often only by luck or one of the dumb ones giving them up.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Arnold J Rimmer View Post
                          So long as it is just onlookers posting locations its nothing. If the officer is mobile the data is obsolete within seconds. I don't much care for stationary radar in any case.

                          We have a volunteer program where we get unpaid civilians to take old, end-of-service-life patrol cars to places and sit in them for a while. it slows everyone down for nothing.

                          I'm thinking that a single volunteer with a city smart phone could maintain speed traps throughout our burg via this feature for a lot less effort and no cost to the City.

                          The key to this app is that it doesn't list the locations of police officers, it lists where people claim they've seen them.
                          That volunteer program that allows end of use units to be used is a great idea, I had suggested a similar idea to our past police chief a few years ago and was laughed out of the room.
                          Just parking a unit on the side of a road will slow people down.
                          As for the OP, it makes me nervous.
                          Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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