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Che Guevara: Hero or Zero?

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  • Che Guevara: Hero or Zero?

    There are so many conflicting opinions of the man. Time magazine included him in the Time 100, a list of the most influential people in the world. Many books have been written extolling his virtues and treating him like the second coming.
    Is it a case of all these people can't be wrong?
    So far I've only read one book on him, "Exposing The Real Che Guevara and the Useful Idiots Who Idolize Him" by Cuban–American author Humberto Fontova, (it was one of those "I need something to occupy me while I fly across the Pond" choices). I daresay he has an axe to grind just as much as all the others, but in a negative way.
    So, for a balanced view, if such a thing exists, can anyone recommend a book? Can I hear your opinions?
    "Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

  • #2


    Muerto! deal with it.
    Kosovo is Serbian.
    I support United Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
    Behead those who say Islam is violent!

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    • #3
      Here's an article from an indepedent organization that refers to Che as a killing machine. In my opinion the Che shirt wearers like to build themselves up as great human rights activists and act like they care about human rights, until you start mentioning Che's treatment of others and then the people who build themselves up as great human rights activists wearing Che shirts don't seem to care about human rights anymore.

      Here are a few excerpts from the link below.

      "Guevara might have been enamored of his own death, but he was much more enamored of other people’s deaths. In April 1967, speaking from experience, he summed up his homicidal idea of justice in his “Message to the Tricontinental”: “hatred as an element of struggle; unbending hatred for the enemy, which pushes a human being beyond his natural limitations, making him into an effective, violent, selective, and cold-blooded killing machine.” His earlier writings are also peppered with this rhetorical and ideological violence."

      "Che’s obsession with collectivist control led him to collaborate on the formation of the security apparatus that was set up to subjugate six and a half million Cubans. In early 1959, a series of secret meetings took place in Tarará, near Havana, at the mansion to which Che temporarily withdrew to recover from an illness. That is where the top leaders, including Castro, designed the Cuban police state."

      Also looks like human rights activist Che setup camps to send those he didn't like.

      From the link below.

      This is how Che explained the function performed by this method of confinement: “[We] only send to Guanahacabibes those doubtful cases where we are not sure people should go to jail ... people who have committed crimes against revolutionary morals, to a lesser or greater degree.... It is hard labor, not brute labor, rather the working conditions there are hard.”

      "This camp was the precursor to the eventual systematic confinement, starting in 1965 in the province of Camagüey, of dissidents, homosexuals, AIDS victims, Catholics, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Afro-Cuban priests, and other such scum, under the banner of Unidades Militares de Ayuda a la Producción, or Military Units to Help Production. "

      http://www.independent.org/newsroom/article.asp?id=1535

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Compo View Post
        There are so many conflicting opinions of the man. Time magazine included him in the Time 100, a list of the most influential people in the world. Many books have been written extolling his virtues and treating him like the second coming.
        Is it a case of all these people can't be wrong?
        So far I've only read one book on him, "Exposing The Real Che Guevara and the Useful Idiots Who Idolize Him" by Cuban–American author Humberto Fontova, (it was one of those "I need something to occupy me while I fly across the Pond" choices). I daresay he has an axe to grind just as much as all the others, but in a negative way.
        So, for a balanced view, if such a thing exists, can anyone recommend a book? Can I hear your opinions?
        Cubans have an axe to grind. Their formerly free, prosperous, and idyllic country was taken over by a despot with an army of murderous thugs. They now live in

        a) abstract squalor in Cuba.

        b) the living standard that they can provide for themselves by their own work in the USA.

        I have known quite a few Cuban expats in the US, the ones I've known have been considerably anti-Communist.
        "The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made."
        — Groucho Marx

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        • #5
          It depends on your political views.
          There are no Nazis in Ukraine. © Idiots

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Catman View Post
            Cubans have an axe to grind. Their formerly free, prosperous, and idyllic country was taken over by a despot with an army of murderous thugs. They now live in

            a) abstract squalor in Cuba.

            b) the living standard that they can provide for themselves by their own work in the USA.

            I have known quite a few Cuban expats in the US, the ones I've known have been considerably anti-Communist.
            Living standards are not actually that bad. The problem is that the economy sucks. Mainly the result of Castro's failed economic policies and is unwillingness to reform.

            Also Cuba was not democratic before him, Fulgencio Batista was also a dictator.
            Last edited by Jonathanrex1; 07 Jun 11, 15:45.
            ´
            “You need to help people. I know it's not very Republican to say but you need to help people.” DONALD TRUMP, 2016

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Compo View Post
              There are so many conflicting opinions of the man. Time magazine included him in the Time 100, a list of the most influential people in the world. Many books have been written extolling his virtues and treating him like the second coming.
              Is it a case of all these people can't be wrong?
              So far I've only read one book on him, "Exposing The Real Che Guevara and the Useful Idiots Who Idolize Him" by Cuban–American author Humberto Fontova, (it was one of those "I need something to occupy me while I fly across the Pond" choices). I daresay he has an axe to grind just as much as all the others, but in a negative way.
              So, for a balanced view, if such a thing exists, can anyone recommend a book? Can I hear your opinions?
              Well the first books you could say a must read on Che are the one's he wrote himself (diaries) if you want to try and understand the man:

              The Motorcycle Diaries
              Guerrilla Warfare: The Authorised Edition
              Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War: Authorised Edition with Corrections Made by Che Guevara
              are probably the most important there are others.

              Or is it just one book 'unbiased definitive/Am sure some will disagree' I can really recommend as more balanced is:
              A Revolutionary Life by Jon Lee Anderson

              http://www.amazon.co.uk/Che-Guevara-...pr_product_top
              • 'If ignorant both of your enemy and yourself, you are certain to be in peril.' Sun Tzu

              Definition of government, "an institution which prevents injustice other than such as it commits itself" by Ibn Khaldun

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              • #8
                Yet, with all the kleptomania of the Batista dictatorship, life for Cubans then was better than it is today. And, one factor that helped Castro overthrow Batista was the fact that the U.S. had cut off military assistance to the Batista regime.

                Compo, can a book be negative on Che and still be balanced? After all, the Manual of the Perfect Latin-American Idiot devotes a chapter to Cuba which does present a number of inconvenient facts regarding El Che, and it is written by people who can certainly marshal their facts. As for his alleged expertise in guerrilla warfare, an educated reading of Luis Reque Teran's La Campana de Nancahuazu certainly lays bare the quixotic efforts of a true believer truly out of his element, and incapable of understanding why. On the plus side, Che did treat captured Bolivian soldiers leniently, merely giving them indoctrination and letting them go.
                Last edited by lirelou; 07 Jun 11, 20:39.
                dit: Lirelou

                Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Tealo View Post
                  Well the first books you could say a must read on Che are the one's he wrote himself (diaries) if you want to try and understand the man:

                  The Motorcycle Diaries
                  Guerrilla Warfare: The Authorised Edition
                  Reminiscences of the Cuban Revolutionary War: Authorised Edition with Corrections Made by Che Guevara
                  are probably the most important there are others.

                  Or is it just one book 'unbiased definitive/Am sure some will disagree' I can really recommend as more balanced is:
                  A Revolutionary Life by Jon Lee Anderson

                  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Che-Guevara-...pr_product_top
                  Thanks all for the answers.
                  Tealo, basically that's what I wanted...the book to get. I'll give it a go, thanks.
                  "Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go."

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                  • #10
                    Such question on this forum is unnecessary,because most of guys here are right/conservatives ecc. including myself I don't need to specify what most of them think of him

                    I read few of his biographies.He was a revolutionist,idealist who wasn't a typical communist of the era and many describe him as a good man,for example he renounced of him ministerial pay.Few politicians would do such things.I could define that a hero.

                    However,he was too much a idealist.Such persons don't survive in our real world.
                    It is always more difficult to fight against faith than against knowledge.

                    Косово је Србија!
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                    • #11
                      He definitely had great ideas and noble goals, but the means by which he sought to achieve said goals were loathable. Inspiring as he is, he still commited mass-murder to achieve his goals, and the end does not justify the means.

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                      • #12
                        I'm not sure I'd put him on the 100 most influential list, but he certainly had his loyal followers in the 60s and is a cult hero to many today. For others they will prefer to look at his sorry ass failure in Bolivia and enjoy the sending of his severed hands to Castro.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Jonathanrex1 View Post
                          Living standards are not actually that bad. The problem is that the economy sucks. Mainly the result of Castro's failed economic policies and is unwillingness to reform.

                          Also Cuba was not democratic before him, Fulgencio Batista was also a dictator.

                          Correct, but dont forget Cuba is under embargo by USA since 1960.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by J.de San Martín View Post
                            Correct, but dont forget Cuba is under embargo by USA since 1960.
                            They are still free to trade with other countries. They are not under a blockade.
                            "The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made."
                            — Groucho Marx

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                            • #15
                              Che was just a typical psycopathic thug given an opportunity to play nation builder. He is know to have revelled in shooting people, not above torture of enemies, and in general just your typical narcissistic sadist.

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