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U.S., Mexico Officers Team Up To Tackle Border Problems

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  • U.S., Mexico Officers Team Up To Tackle Border Problems

    Once again, U.S. officers are sharing intelligence with their counterparts to the south, but they are also receiving intelligence in return. In select areas, officers are conducting parallel patrols every day, and the U.S. Border Patrol is working to train Mexican police officers in border towns.
    more http://slatest.slate.com/id/2248947/?wpisrc=newsletter

    And

    "Heroin King" Arrested in Mexico

    Medina, known as "Don Pepe" or Mexico's "King of Heroin," was allegedly responsible for smuggling thousands of pounds of heroin into Southern California every year440 pounds each month.
    more http://slatest.slate.com/id/2248940/?wpisrc=newsletter
    Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

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  • #2
    Im not so sure this is such a good idea, the Mexican law enforcement system is flooded with corruption and other acts of misconduct. It would not be a wise idea to have any sort of joint operations with them, all the details will be leaked to the smugglers, gangs, and cartels by crooked Mexican cops!

    For some reason the first thing that came to my mind is our so called Vietnam War "allies", the incredibly corrupt and incompetent ARVN

    EDIT: I realize that not all ARVN units were in cahoots with the Commies and that several were just as good as the best US units but in general they did not perform that well.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ChrisF1987 View Post
      Im not so sure this is such a good idea, the Mexican law enforcement system is flooded with corruption and other acts of misconduct. It would not be a wise idea to have any sort of joint operations with them, all the details will be leaked to the smugglers, gangs, and cartels by crooked Mexican cops!

      For some reason the first thing that came to my mind is our so called Vietnam War "allies", the incredibly corrupt and incompetent ARVN

      EDIT: I realize that not all ARVN units were in cahoots with the Commies and that several were just as good as the best US units but in general they did not perform that well.
      Sadly,Chris is right.But there are most definitely Mexican officials and officers that want to take down the cartels.How do we sort through the bad apples to support the good ones?
      ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

      BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

      BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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      • #4
        For some reason the first thing that came to my mind is our so called Vietnam War "allies", the incredibly corrupt and incompetent ARVN
        Well, impressions are one thing, reality is another. If you are interested, try Vietnam's Forgotten Army by Andrew Wiest.

        the Mexican law enforcement system is flooded with corruption and other acts of misconduct. It would not be a wise idea to have any sort of joint operations with them, all the details will be leaked to the smugglers, gangs, and cartels by crooked Mexican cops!
        Far too true! The problem, however, is that short of war, we can't do anything outside our borders without the cooperation of the host nation. So it is either some cooperation, or nothing. And cooperation can burn you. There was the case of Frank Rodriguez, a courageous and dedicated DEA Agent serving as DEA country attache then. The Army Commander who had taken down "Guero" Palma, one of the Guadalajara kingpins, had been appointed to head Mexico's national anti-narcotics agency. Franks dilemma was to cooperate or not in information sharing, and without cooperation all the U.S. CN efforts in Mexico would have ground to a halt. Everybody 'knew' that the General was corrupt, so care was taken to work around that. But when his ties to the 'cartels' got publicized, Sen. Jesse Helms began screaming for Frank's head. That ended the career of an honorable man. My frank opinion of Sen. Jesse Helms' actions is that Frank's last name had something to do with the Senator's suspicions. You know, if one is a Mexican-American, one has to be incapable of being clear-eyed when it comes to Mexico. Yet Frank's vision of Mexico was anything but romanticized. He was a hard-headed realist with years of experience in Latin America.
        Last edited by lirelou; 26 Mar 10, 10:38.
        dit: Lirelou

        Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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        • #5
          How bad exactly is the corruption in Mexico? Wasn't this the reason why the Mexican government used their Navy troops to conduct operations, rather than the police/army?

          I guess it's really hard to fight a well-entrenched group. It's one thing to be offered a bribe to look another way, and quite another to have your family threatened with death if you don't cooperate, and these groups have been known to push through with their threats. The carrot and the stick. Does anyone see this situation resolving itself anytime soon? How effective are the government's actions?
          "We have no white flag."

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          • #6
            Silver or Lead

            Forty Billion Dollars of drug profits willl buy a lot of cooperation just about anywhere. This is a huge problem and I'm glad there are still patriotic Mexicans willing to stand up to the cartels.

            The video discusses torture so be warned:

            Last edited by GCoyote; 30 Mar 10, 18:27.
            Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

            Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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            • #7
              Property owners should be allowed to shoot first,ask questions later:

              http://www.foxnews.com/us/2010/03/29...izona-rancher/
              ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

              BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

              BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

              Comment


              • #8
                Hello GCoyote.

                Thanks for the warning. I still watched it, though. Wish I hadn't. Noone deserves it.
                "We have no white flag."

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                • #9
                  The situation on the Mexican border is deteriorating rapidly.I'm at the point where I feel that our military must be deployed to protect our nation.And a fence or wall will not be enough.I'm at the point where I feel that we should create a buffer zone a couple miles wide,using Mexican territory as opposed to our own.I know it will **** off the Mexicans and the liberals,but too bad.And anyone caught crossing that buffer zone should be mowed down like grass.Sorry,but it's becoming a "them or us" situation.I don't want to read any more articles about Mexican military incursions into US territory,American citizens murdered on their own property,US towns fearing attacks or overwhelming refugee swarms.Our President's primary fuction is to protect the nation and those that legally reside within it.Now I fully understand that Obama and his minions are "less" concerned with that,but this is really getting serious down there.
                  ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                  BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                  BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    What's really stopping the government from sending in troops to secure the border? The border's way too porous.
                    "We have no white flag."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      What's really stopping the government from sending in troops to secure the border? The border's way too porous.
                      Reply With Quote
                      Right now, campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the feeling among the professional military that their services business is fighting military campaigns, not quasi-law enforcement efforts on the border. What can change that: Write your Congressman. But that won't do much? Hey, welcome to democracy. It's the worlds worst system of government, except for all those other systems. (If I remember Churchill correctly)

                      And Gixxer, forget about operations in Mexico. We'll have enough legal problems deploying them within our own territory.
                      dit: Lirelou

                      Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                        And Gixxer, forget about operations in Mexico. We'll have enough legal problems deploying them within our own territory.
                        Yeah,I know.But I feel the situation is getting to the point where something drastic needs to be done.A fence or wall along the border isn't enough.What's really needed there is a wide buffer zone.
                        ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                        BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                        BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I agree with Gixxer, we need a buffer zone on the US-Mexico border I would say about 4 miles wide complete with fixed fortifications on our side - nothing extensive just a few firebase type forts and some mini forts with concrete bunkers and an observation tower here and there.

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                          • #14
                            Of course legitimate traffic would still be allowed across the border,but something has to be done before it gets worse.And the buffer zone MUST consist of Mexican territory,not US soil.And the issue of US troops deployed on US soil wouldn't matter if they deploy directly across the border in Mexico.In my opinion,the feelings or opinions of the Mexican government and people no longer matter,as far as this subject is concerned.
                            ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                            BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                            BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In my opinion,the feelings or opinions of the Mexican government and people no longer matter,as far as this subject is concerned.
                              Well, that is not the United States' governments position. If you want something done on the border, go with the feasible and not the impossible. There are a lot of other areas that need to be addressed to make border surveillance and control more effective, and with enough political pressure, some of those can be enacted.
                              dit: Lirelou

                              Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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