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Argentine government to undermine Falklands Referendum

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  • Andy H
    replied
    Originally posted by Bass_Man86 View Post
    Another point to keep in mind, and not one recalled by the folks that seem to believe that the UK is bullying around Argentina, is that the Falkland Islands were not populated either by Spaniards, Argentinians, or an aboriginal population. For a colony to be colony one implies the existence of a native population that either found itself dominated, displaced, or eliminated by the colonists. That is clearly not the case with the Falklands. If anything the reverse is true; Buenos Aires is trying to impose its will on a population that does not identify with Argentina. In other words Buenos Aires is trying to play colonial power by painting itself as the victim in the eyes of the world. It was pure malarkey when the military junta invaded and it is still pure malarkey now.
    Hi

    Indeed, it not a colony but a Dominion if anything, but for Admin purposes etc it was granted Dependency status back in the day

    Regards

    Leave a comment:


  • queensman
    replied
    Originally posted by Bass_Man86 View Post
    Another point to keep in mind, and not one recalled by the folks that seem to believe that the UK is bullying around Argentina, is that the Falkland Islands were not populated either by Spaniards, Argentinians, or an aboriginal population. For a colony to be colony one implies the existence of a native population that either found itself dominated, displaced, or eliminated by the colonists. That is clearly not the case with the Falklands. If anything the reverse is true; Buenos Aires is trying to impose its will on a population that does not identify with Argentina. In other words Buenos Aires is trying to play colonial power by painting itself as the victim in the eyes of the world. It was pure malarkey when the military junta invaded and it is still pure malarkey now.
    What you say is so true, back in 85 my battalion did a 6 month tour and the locals hated anything to do with argentina and were more patriotic and british than we were.
    To be honest its a dull boring place but the weather and terrain are challenging and i found this out when i did my jnco cadre there.
    I have not been there since and certainly would not want to fight for it. but bullies have to be stood up to and the argentiniao prime minister needs to look at recent history to know that it would be unwise to take a step too far.

    Sent from my GT-I5500 using Tapatalk 2
    Last edited by queensman; 03 Dec 12, 18:43.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bass_Man86
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    I often wonder that one myself. The problem is this double standard. Argentinians of course are mostly immigrant stock, what aboriginal peoples were there were decimated and outbred. I think it's a question of how far you go back. As I understand it the Argentine government want to take it to some point, which I do not know if true, wherin Argentina had already seceded or what have you from Spain's grip, but before the islands were under British control. If that existed.
    I'm fairly sure that the modern international system as we recognise it hadn't really come into being at that time, with its various institutions, so I'm not sure of the legal grounds in that one.
    Another point to keep in mind, and not one recalled by the folks that seem to believe that the UK is bullying around Argentina, is that the Falkland Islands were not populated either by Spaniards, Argentinians, or an aboriginal population. For a colony to be colony one implies the existence of a native population that either found itself dominated, displaced, or eliminated by the colonists. That is clearly not the case with the Falklands. If anything the reverse is true; Buenos Aires is trying to impose its will on a population that does not identify with Argentina. In other words Buenos Aires is trying to play colonial power by painting itself as the victim in the eyes of the world. It was pure malarkey when the military junta invaded and it is still pure malarkey now.

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevinmeath
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    I often wonder that one myself. The problem is this double standard. Argentinians of course are mostly immigrant stock, what aboriginal peoples were there were decimated and outbred. I think it's a question of how far you go back. As I understand it the Argentine government want to take it to some point, which I do not know if true, wherin Argentina had already seceded or what have you from Spain's grip, but before the islands were under British control. If that existed.
    I'm fairly sure that the modern international system as we recognise it hadn't really come into being at that time, with its various institutions, so I'm not sure of the legal grounds in that one.

    I seem to half remember reading somewhere (sometime) that international law (whatever that is) will not go back more than 150 years, one of the possible reasons for the invasion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Selous
    replied
    Originally posted by Kevinmeath View Post
    Would 'settler' or 'colonial' people include much of the Argentine population? or indeed much of the population of North and South America.

    I presume only the Aborigional people are allowed in Australian elections and the Moari in New Zealand
    I often wonder that one myself. The problem is this double standard. Argentinians of course are mostly immigrant stock, what aboriginal peoples were there were decimated and outbred. I think it's a question of how far you go back. As I understand it the Argentine government want to take it to some point, which I do not know if true, wherin Argentina had already seceded or what have you from Spain's grip, but before the islands were under British control. If that existed.
    I'm fairly sure that the modern international system as we recognise it hadn't really come into being at that time, with its various institutions, so I'm not sure of the legal grounds in that one.

    Leave a comment:


  • queensman
    replied
    The argentinian government had a training ship impounded and couldn't afford to pay up, so god knows where they will get the money from.
    They have been playing a propaganda campaign against britain ever since the mess they created in 82, even getting some of their olympians to run up and down the british war memorial in the Falklands.
    I don't know if anyone has seen the argentine movie about the falklands war, but its worse than a geobbles movie and portrays the islanders as welcoming them as liberators.
    The argentinian govermnent always focuses on the falklands when it wants to distract its population from its own domestic problems

    Sent from my GT-I5500 using Tapatalk 2

    Leave a comment:


  • Kevinmeath
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    On a recent article I wrote about Gib, some snarky commentator pointed out that under UN law a vote to remain in place, if conducted by a 'settler' or 'colonial' people doesn't count as they're there 'illegally'. Good luck getting the police force to carry out that 'law.
    Would 'settler' or 'colonial' people include much of the Argentine population? or indeed much of the population of North and South America.

    I presume only the Aborigional people are allowed in Australian elections and the Moari in New Zealand

    Leave a comment:


  • Selous
    replied
    Likewise the Falklands issue. And Gibraltar's popn is mostly Sicilian and Maltese too, and they've been there for some time. I don't blame these Banana Republics for trying to get these bits of land back, it's perfectly natural. We just need to look more to accepting that it may not be resolved, and prepared to keep the status quo, rather than seeking to settle some kind of 'right or wrong' about these issues, when there's arguments for both sides (not that I think much of the opposing arguments, but there's no qualified judge and police force to carry anything out)

    Leave a comment:


  • ChrisF1987
    replied
    Originally posted by Selous View Post
    On a recent article I wrote about Gib, some snarky commentator pointed out that under UN law a vote to remain in place, if conducted by a 'settler' or 'colonial' people doesn't count as they're there 'illegally'. Good luck getting the police force to carry out that 'law.
    So that means a vote by Bermuda to remain a British Overseas Territory is invalid even though nobody lived there before the British settled the island?

    The British ARE Bermuda' indigenous people!

    Leave a comment:


  • Selous
    replied
    On a recent article I wrote about Gib, some snarky commentator pointed out that under UN law a vote to remain in place, if conducted by a 'settler' or 'colonial' people doesn't count as they're there 'illegally'. Good luck getting the police force to carry out that 'law.

    Leave a comment:


  • billscottmorri
    replied
    Perhaps Argentina should stamp their feet and make a nasty scowling face. That should sort out them pesky democrats!

    Who do those Falkies think they are anyway running around voting on things! How on earth do they ever think they will integrate with Argentina with that attitude?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hida Akechi
    replied
    Originally posted by ITALICA ONE View Post
    The recent discovery of perhaps as much as 500 million barrels of oil deposits in the region is certainly going to escalate the already tense situation over the Islands. I seriously doubt that Argentina will just let the oil profits sail past their noses back to Great Britain.
    I seriously doubt that Argentina could do one damned thing about it. It's not their islands, it's not their oil.

    The Falklands are 300 miles of the coast of Argentina, the Falklands are 8000 miles of the coast of Britain. In this day and age what is a British colony still doing in South American Waters?

    http://www.greatmilitarybattles.com/...d_islands.html
    The citizens of the Falklands are British and want to remain British. Too effing bad for Argentina. The islands never belonged to Argentina.

    In this day and age Argentina should know better than to push forward such and "Imperialist" agenda. Ha, ha, that felt great to type out

    They are better off letting their spurious claims go once and for all and trying to improve relations with Great Britain and the Falkland Islands.

    Oh, I fixed your typo too. You're welcome.

    Leave a comment:


  • redcoat
    replied
    The aim is to dissuade British political personalities from attending the vote as observers, therefore detracting from its legitimacy.
    I wasn't even aware that the British government was considering inviting 'political personalities' to observe the vote.

    Leave a comment:


  • calger14
    replied
    Whatever the Argentinians try to do to change the referendum won't stop them losing.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dashy
    replied
    Originally posted by Rojik View Post
    I think it's about time you sent the RN down there and gave them a touch up.
    given that state the Argies are in, they could probably refloat the Victory and use that to trounce them.

    Leave a comment:

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