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  • #31
    Originally posted by VinceW View Post
    Here in Alberta we would want to be an independent country if Canada broke up most of us would not want to be intergrated with the US.
    You wouldn't be by yourself. Most Canadians I grew up with and around would jump into a volcano before joining with the USA.
    "Take the risk of thinking for yourself, much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way." - Christopher Hitchens

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    • #32
      Originally posted by globetrotter View Post
      You wouldn't be by yourself. Most Canadians I grew up with and around would jump into a volcano before joining with the USA.
      NO active volcano's in Canada. To jump they would have to at least us our volcano's
      "Ask not what your country can do for you"

      Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

      you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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      • #33
        Here is a smattering of quotes from experts and scholars from a website "Bilateralist" when asked the question "What is one thing you’d like to tell Canadians about the U.S., and/or one thing you’d tell Americans about Canada?"

        "Canadians should understand how fond Americans are of Canada. Americans should understand that Canada is not the same as the United States. While we have much in common, there are political, cultural, and historic differences." - US Ambassador David Jacobsen


        "We’ve grown up; we’ve shed our adolescent fears. Our sovereignty today is not only economic, political or territorial; it’s the sovereignty of the mind. We’re Canadians, and let us hope that means something more than just not being Americans. After 144 years as a nation we know who we are, and we are here to stay.” -David Archibald - executive director of the Association for Canadian Studies in the United States

        " To Canadians, I’d like to say, “It’s not about you.” American ignorance of Canada is not a willful snub of Canada. Most U.S. legislation that affects Canada almost always has another target besides Canada. Most Americans like Canada and Canadians, even if sometimes it’s in a very naive way.
        To Americans, I’d say, “Open your eyes.” We can learn an awful lot about what works in Canada and why, what doesn’t work and why (I’m thinking of health care). We’re very similar societies, which makes my work all the more challenging." - David Biette - Director of the Canada Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC.

        "Canadians think they know everything about the US and they don’t and Americans think they know enough about Canada and they don’t. We should all strive to learn more about each other." - Former US Ambassador to Canada David Wilkins

        "I tell any American who will listen that Canada is NOT exactly like us. The country is, in fact, a lot different than the U.S. and those differences should be applauded." - Christine “Christy” Cox is a senior advisor to David H. Wilkins from North Carolina

        "The French essayist André Gide once wrote, “Please don’t understand me too quickly.” That would be my advice to Canadians and Americans regarding each other. The complexities and nuances of these two great societies are masked by our pragmatic desire to get along and forge ahead and get down to business or have fun in one another’s company. And the truth is, we keep it simple for each other and get along just fine most of the time; in short, we thrive on understanding each other, and ourselves, too quickly. Plato tells us that Socrates said that the unexamined life is hardly worth living. We would all do well to take another look at our neighbors and ourselves, and it is likely that if we did, we’d discover just how much we don’t know or understand at all" - Christopher Sands, Senior Fellow at Hudson Institute, where he specializes on Canada and U.S.-Canadian relations

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Miss Saigon View Post
          ...

          I think all we need are truly functioning free trade agreements and then to each his own. Let everyone do their own thing.

          Although we should adopt the metric system
          Originally posted by Lucky 6 View Post
          Heresy! I want none of that witchcraft!
          Most American military systems are already metric.
          Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

          Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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          • #35
            Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
            Most American military systems are already metric.
            Not to mention that we are perfectly find buying our water and Milk in Gallons and our soft drinks in Liters...

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            • #36
              While no one can predict the next hundred years, certainly, it would have to be a very, very different world for Canada and the US for form one nation. While there are close economic, cultural, and military ties (at least regarding defense of the continent) there are significant differences in how each state manages its foreign affairs. There are differences in domestic policies also. I can't imagine the policies of the Canadian Liberal Party having much of a following among conservative types in the US. Likewise the US Republican party would be anathema to Canadian liberals. Both countries are actually federations. The the fifty US states and the 10 Canadian provinces. It would require a collapse of either federal government for the constituent parts to seek another arrangement. Even then I don't believe there would be a union of all the parts.

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Magister View Post
                While no one can predict the next hundred years, certainly, it would have to be a very, very different world for Canada and the US for form one nation. While there are close economic, cultural, and military ties (at least regarding defense of the continent) there are significant differences in how each state manages its foreign affairs. There are differences in domestic policies also. I can't imagine the policies of the Canadian Liberal Party having much of a following among conservative types in the US. Likewise the US Republican party would be anathema to Canadian liberals. Both countries are actually federations. The the fifty US states and the 10 Canadian provinces. It would require a collapse of either federal government for the constituent parts to seek another arrangement. Even then I don't believe there would be a union of all the parts.
                Well remember, union does not mean totally joined at the hip. Canada is part of the Commonwealth, and has everything distinct except head of state.
                All of the members of the EU control their own governments. The UK is in the EU, but controls it's own monetary system.

                There are a lot of ways a North American Union could take place.

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                • #38
                  I am frankly having a lot of difficulty with the definitions some have with the concept of union and disunion.

                  Most of the separatist ideologies I read about in the West, Scottish, Quebecois etc presume some level of continued economic connection (dare I say subsidy) on thepart of the former mother country.

                  At the same time the notion of a national cultural unity is downplayed and opposed even governmentally.

                  Again Quebecois forcing everything written to be in French as well as English is one example.

                  Another is that in certain businesses in Southern California and the Texas border region, national chains like McDonalds and Walmart, te employees will speak to you in Spanish first as often as not and if they do greet you in English, the rest of the conversations are in Spanish. These are not illegal immigrants but sometimes second and third generation citizens who speak less English that their parents did.

                  My point being that absent a perception that potential members of a North American Union would even have the desire to seek common cultural ground, an economic union would prove as failed as the European versionform most of the same reasons.
                  "I ask, Sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them."
                  George Mason
                  Co-author of the Second Amendment
                  during Virginia’s Convention to Ratify the Constitution, 1788

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by niikeb View Post
                    Well remember, union does not mean totally joined at the hip. Canada is part of the Commonwealth, and has everything distinct except head of state. All of the members of the EU control their own governments. The UK is in the EU, but controls it's own monetary system. There are a lot of ways a North American Union could take place.
                    True, there are what, fifteen countries that share Queen Elizabeth as head of State? Each pretty much follows it's own policies. Not exactly a union in my opinion. More like club members. While greater economic union is likely, political union is very unlikely in my opinion. Even the EU founders when it comes to foreign policy. Canadians certainly object to aspects of US foreign policy and I cannot see that changing anytime soon. Nor can I see the US adopt a foreign policy more like that of Canada (although that would be much more economical!)

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Cyberknight View Post
                      Another is that in certain businesses in Southern California and the Texas border region, national chains like McDonalds and Walmart, te employees will speak to you in Spanish first as often as not and if they do greet you in English, the rest of the conversations are in Spanish. These are not illegal immigrants but sometimes second and third generation citizens who speak less English that their parents did.

                      My point being that absent a perception that potential members of a North American Union would even have the desire to seek common cultural ground, an economic union would prove as failed as the European versionform most of the same reasons.
                      Actually second and 3rd generation speak a lot of English.
                      http://pewresearch.org/pubs/644/engl...sage-hispanics.

                      Also an economic union in the sense that the UK is doing just fine with their money while being part of the EU with open borders and import/export.

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