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  • Dutch researchers find Corona virus antibody

    https://innovationorigins.com/dutch-...irus-antibody/
    A world premiere for Erasmus MC and Utrecht University. Researchers from the two universities have discovered an antibody against COVID-19. The scientific paper from the group of ten scientists is now ready for peer reviews from the leading professional journal Nature. The Rotterdam university journal –
    Erasmus Magazine
    – first reported the sensational news.

    “We are now trying to get a pharmaceutical company on board – that’s looking good, by the way – which can mass-produce the antibody as a medicine on a large scale. This is the very first antibody that we know of that will block the infection. And there is a good chance that this will also become a medicine that reaches the market. If this is taken by a patient, then it is expected that the infection can be stopped in that patient. So, the patient will have a chance of recovery.”


    So long, suckers
    "For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return"

  • #2
    Good to go. Whenever everyone's lives are on the line, every one seems to pull out all the stops and work together. No doubt multiple pharma companies will be jumping at the chance to produce a treatment.
    Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
      Good to go. Whenever everyone's lives are on the line, every one seems to pull out all the stops and work together. No doubt multiple pharma companies will be jumping at the chance to produce a treatment.
      Was reading a piece by Finnish somethingsomethingtodowithepidemics, and he said that this is kinda the problem. All countries suck when it comes to being prepared for epidemics, and only when the actual threat emerges does action begin. Money starts flowing and resources are being put to good use, fast action is taken. Under normal situations something like this would take years to get through.

      Obviously, good that we actually do this, but also as soon as the Coronavirus-situation is over all lessons learned will be forgotten, all funding pulled, and we're back to normal waiting for the next outbreak. Then again, this is pretty much how everything ever has worked.

      Imagine that 1.5 billion that was now used to fund banks was injected into preventive research before the outbreak...
      Wisdom is personal

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      • #4
        Looks very promising

        Here we report a human monoclonal antibody that neutralizes SARS-CoV-2 (and SARS-CoV). This cross-neutralizing antibody targets a communal epitope on these viruses and offers potential for prevention and treatment of COVID-19.
        Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Game.

        Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Rutger View Post
          https://innovationorigins.com/dutch-...irus-antibody/
          A world premiere for Erasmus MC and Utrecht University. Researchers from the two universities have discovered an antibody against COVID-19. The scientific paper from the group of ten scientists is now ready for peer reviews from the leading professional journal Nature. The Rotterdam university journal –
          Erasmus Magazine
          – first reported the sensational news.

          “We are now trying to get a pharmaceutical company on board – that’s looking good, by the way – which can mass-produce the antibody as a medicine on a large scale. This is the very first antibody that we know of that will block the infection. And there is a good chance that this will also become a medicine that reaches the market. If this is taken by a patient, then it is expected that the infection can be stopped in that patient. So, the patient will have a chance of recovery.”


          So long, suckers
          Propaganda nonsense from Erasmus : people who are vaccinated against the flu have the same risk to have the flu as people who are not vaccinated . It is the same for CV .
          The risk of having CV depends mainly on the health of the potential victim not on a miracle cure .
          The risk of becoming seriously ill depends also on the health of the potential victim .
          Medicine is powerless against virus .

          Comment


          • #6
            Instead of spreading panic ( hobby of the media ) or boasting : WE have the solution, some people should consult something serious as :
            The threat of pandemic influenza . Are we ready?
            Workshop summary pyblished by the National Academies Press in 2005.
            IN 2005 !!
            And the answer is : NO, we are not ready .
            What Erasmus is boasting,is that they could have something against the present pandemic, which will be produced and be available when the present pandemic will be over and which will not be useful against the NEXT pandemic .
            But which will yield a lot of money .

            Comment


            • #7
              Well, in all fairness, there's no particular way to prepare for something that you don't know about. Not in the vein of making a specific treatment/cure/vaccine. So those actions are by necessity reactive. Same with test kits, wholly reactive in the initial stages.

              Best case planning would allow for restricting movement, aka Borders (gasp), to localize an outbreak of disease X, Efforts to quarantine and prevent spread of Disease X within the localization, Efforts to treat those suffering from disease X within the localization area or specified and properly isolated/prepared areas outside the localization area, and having templates for communications/documentation that can be rapidly modified to fit whatever disease X is and deployed with a minimum of specific effort required.

              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                Well, in all fairness, there's no particular way to prepare for something that you don't know about. Not in the vein of making a specific treatment/cure/vaccine. So those actions are by necessity reactive. Same with test kits, wholly reactive in the initial stages.
                You can't be prepared for a specific new disease, yes.

                Not being short on general hospital beds (Italy - we're below the European average of beds per population) or on ICUs and ventilators (the USA) would be good general measures, though.

                That said, we all outside China did have a warning. Not a long one, but it was a warning. Did we make good use of it?
                Michele

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Michele View Post

                  You can't be prepared for a specific new disease, yes.

                  Not being short on general hospital beds (Italy - we're below the European average of beds per population) or on ICUs and ventilators (the USA) would be good general measures, though.

                  That said, we all outside China did have a warning. Not a long one, but it was a warning. Did we make good use of it?
                  I would say a lot of places did not make a good use of it.

                  As for the US hospital system/medical system, the whole private sector part of it brings up some interesting bits. Namely that there's functionally more doctors offices and places to receive minor medical care in the US. There are also a large number of outpatient procedure centers. I will trust your note that the US has a lower proportion of ICUs to Euro-style nationalized systems, though I doubt it's significantly lower per capita. However, on something like say Coronary Angioplasty, the 'average' in my area for heart attack to angioplasty is 2 hours....they literally wheel you straight from the ambulance bay to the cath lab and some people are discharged same day if they happen to have an infarction in the morning (we work very closely with the EMS field as despite being a fairly populous county for the state we're still pretty spread out, and despite the rural areas we're rather proud of our MI survival rate). So the efficiencies are there. In my region there are three competing hospital systems, so a particular failing by one wouldn't result in a catastrophic lack of care to the populace at large.

                  What you can generally find with the US is that the capacity to scale is there, and that was why one of those throwaway lines in the National Emergency press conference meant something to me. When Trump talked about removing restrictions on where hospitals can treat patients, that was a kicker for me. It meant that he was telling DHHS to take the 'certificates of need' off the table, typically there are regulations on hospitals and certain types of specialized care to prevent TOO Many from popping up and killing each other off through cutthroat competition. With that out of the picture temporarily, things can scale, step down ICUs can be converted to full ICUs, and regular rooms to step down units, with lower level patients farmed elsewhere. On the whole, at least in my area, we can double our nursing capacity in the short term by cutting days off (in the same way that we double our LE capacity during natural disasters by cutting out days off for cops).

                  Also, the US has an asset, one we didn't use properly at first, but one that's been helping us nonetheless. The SIZE. My state alone, not a very big one, is roughly Half the size of Italy, with one Sixth the Population. New York State is half the size of italy, with one third the population. NYC is pretty boned, as they've got a little over 8 million packed into 502 square miles, but cities have always taken it on the chin with plagues.

                  My state has as of last count I can find, 32 cases. They've been rising by a case or two every other day. And spread out over 13 counties each roughly the size of NYC or one of the boroughs. Almost all cases have been 'imports', IE people who went overseas and came back with it. So when you talk about 1629 cases in the US, you have to think that those 1629 cases are spread out over the third largest country by landmass on earth. And a country that with the exception of certain large cities, has a very low population density compared to Europe, with a fairly spread out populace even in the relatively populous east coast. In my area, more people own than rent, there are more neighborhoods than apartments, and it's a lot harder to spread a disease when you're on your own half to 3/4 of an acre with your own HVAC system. With the internet allowing a lot of people to be able to work from home or from smaller office sizes, I think we've got a pretty good shot to keep the curve relatively flat and control the outbreak to a smoldering brush fire rather than a raging forest fire.....something that our medical system can more than handle.
                  Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Michele View Post
                    Did we make good use of it ?
                    Well the next few months will tell,

                    certainly lessons were drawn from the severity of what happened in China and Italy....

                    Just a few weeks ago, closing cafés and restaurants for instance, would have been unacceptable here.

                    Policy has to follow the public mood to some degree, there's only so much you can do in anticipation.
                    Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Game.

                    Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Plus, some things that happened that you might not be aware of because they weren't publicized.

                      Nursing homes voluntarily went on a 2 week lockdown. I cannot visit either grandmother because their assisted living home is not allowing ANY visitors for 14 days. A disproportionate number of US deaths were in nursing homes, so locking all of the local ones down while a handle is gotten on it, though we've had no cases in nursing homes in my state, is prudent but wasn't mandated.

                      Personally I think we should have pulled a Russia, and done a full border lock down for 30 days once the first cases popped up outside China. Then backed off and allowed travel to-from countries that had also avoided the brunt of it.

                      Between that and the FDA cutting out red tape, we could have put our rather large medical manufacturing industry to work for the US. Based on what I can tell, a lot of South Korea's test kits were made in the US, so we've been exporting to other countries to help stop the virus even while we needed to be stockpiling here. But we have excess capacity at home that's not being used for it yet, and is being spooled up. I've been involved in security discussions for local pharma plants to ensure that they don't have any disruptions as they start pumping out test kits.

                      Just like in war, the US is a Sleeping Giant. If whatever the disaster is doesn't knock us out in a couple of months, things spool up and our sheer size and industry get to work....at which point we have a solid chance of coming out better off.
                      Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                        (…)
                        Nursing homes voluntarily went on a 2 week lockdown. I cannot visit either grandmother because their assisted living home is not allowing ANY visitors for 14 days..
                        Hospitals are doing the same here, limiting visitors to minimal, delaying non-urgent treatments etc..

                        Everything geared to reserving "beds" for critical patients.
                        Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Game.

                        Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post

                          Hospitals are doing the same here, limiting visitors to minimal, delaying non-urgent treatments etc..

                          Everything geared to reserving "beds" for critical patients.
                          Same. Hospitals have limited visitors to immediate family who are adults and not sick.

                          And churches all voluntarily went along with the governor and canceled services for 2 weeks. They went to livestreaming, and some small groups met outside of church.
                          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
                            Between that and the FDA cutting out red tape, we could have put our rather large medical manufacturing industry to work for the US. Based on what I can tell, a lot of South Korea's test kits were made in the US, so we've been exporting to other countries to help stop the virus even while we needed to be stockpilinG
                            The Korean approach

                            https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/12/asia/...hnk/index.html

                            The US approach
                            https://www.businessinsider.com/us-c...imeline-2020-3

                            South Korea is producing their tests domestically and exporting them now.

                            No information on the US exporting tests at all that I can find.

                            perhaps someone else has a source supporting this claim.


                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Michele View Post

                              You can't be prepared for a specific new disease, yes.

                              Not being short on general hospital beds (Italy - we're below the European average of beds per population) or on ICUs and ventilators (the USA) would be good general measures, though.

                              That said, we all outside China did have a warning. Not a long one, but it was a warning. Did we make good use of it?
                              The warning was there already in January : every one knew that the virus would enter Europe .

                              Comment

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