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HNoMS Helge Ingstad (F313) collision with tanker Sola TS

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  • #31
    I still find it rather suspect that the Norse would put up with a design choice that might suffice for Spain, where the ship will always be in warm water ports, but might be problematic in cold-water areas and the tighter navigational situations that would commonly arise in Norway.
    Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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    • #32
      Well... Those waters aren't that cold - they are kept reasonably warm (for the latitude) by the Gulf Stream. And neither are the Norwegian fjords that difficult to navigate - they tend to be rather wide with plenty of water even near the shore lines (try navigating Finnish or Swedish archipelagos and you'll figure out what i meant). Regardless as far as i have understood the problem relates to the propeller shaft or rather how it was boxed (or its gears were boxed). If what has been described is accurate then the hull damage from the collision was not really that big of a thing (sure it was a really nasty gash) but the real problem was that something in the collision resulted in the propeller shaft tunnels or then the hollow propeller shafts (not quite sure which or both) to pretty much siphon as much of at Atlantic inside as they could.
      It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion, it is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed. The hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion

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      • #33
        So, something along the lines of what caused Prince of Wales to sink, issues with the propeller shaft and seals in that region causing massive progressive flooding forward into the ship.
        Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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        • #34
          Originally posted by TacCovert4 View Post
          So, something along the lines of what caused Prince of Wales to sink, issues with the propeller shaft and seals in that region causing massive progressive flooding forward into the ship.
          Apparently so. Also the design was supposed to be fully protected against such a event but it just didn't work. I guess the real question is 'why'. And answer to that may affect more than just Norwegian ships.
          It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion, it is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed. The hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
            Apparently so. Also the design was supposed to be fully protected against such a event but it just didn't work. I guess the real question is 'why'. And answer to that may affect more than just Norwegian ships.
            Navantia built Australia's two LHDs, and they had significant engine issues, primarily the azimuth propulsion system. It was written that the Australian versions picked up the issues because of the vast distances they sail compared to the Spanish version. Faulty engine seals and leaking oil into different engine areas were other issues. And given our destroyers are designed by Navantia one has to hope those designs remain trouble free, but during construction design flaws were found, which setback the deadline significantly.
            "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
            Ernest Hemingway.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
              Navantia built Australia's two LHDs, and they had significant engine issues, primarily the azimuth propulsion system. It was written that the Australian versions picked up the issues because of the vast distances they sail compared to the Spanish version. Faulty engine seals and leaking oil into different engine areas were other issues. And given our destroyers are designed by Navantia one has to hope those designs remain trouble free, but during construction design flaws were found, which setback the deadline significantly.
              I'm surprised that ships are not designed to be equally effective in and for all climates and sailing distances. One never knows where one has to end up deplored to, especially for nations tied by alliances.

              I certainly hope that is the case with US ships as we are all over the globe and seem to have alliances with half of the world.
              Last edited by Salinator; 12 Jun 19, 22:15.
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              • #37
                Originally posted by Salinator View Post

                I'm surprised that ships are not designed to be equally effective in for all climates and sailing distances. One never knows where one has to end up deplored to, especially for nations tied by alliances.

                I certainly hope that is the case with US ships as we are all over the globe and seem to have alliances with half of the world.
                There was talk that the Australian navy was pushing the limits of the design, but the chief of the navy denies it. The other ongoing issue is the excessive updraft of wind coming up the side of the ship and affecting helicopters when in the shutdown process, which caused the helicopter blades to act erratically, leading to unfavourable blade orientation.
                "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                Ernest Hemingway.

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