Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Brexit

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
    All our products and services would have to comply with EU regulations.
    That will remain so for the better part whether in or out of the EU. All machinery, equipment, electronics, toys and whatnot being imported into the EU will have to meet the CE standards. This applies to machinery and equipment from all over the world anyway. I'm pretty sure there are a lot of European standards that will apply to a lot of other trading products and services.
    Any machine that doesn't meet CE standards will not be used. One accident with permanent personal harm and you're up **** creek.

    "For once you have tasted flight you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skywards, for there you have been and there you will long to return"

    Comment


    • #47
      I have no idea how this will all pan out in the end, but I must say this OP seems indicative of a new sense of... urgency, I guess is the polite wording... on the UK side of things.

      As someone said: the UK is not jumping off a cliff because there is no cliff, more like a low curb. The problem however is that you need to at least jump to clear also a low curb, or else you risk falling flat on your face with potential GBH as a consequence. The UK can/could make this work in a manner of ways, but all of them would require determination and preparation in advance. And THAT seems to be the real danger looking ahead for the UK; lack of preparation for whatever specific future it could/should have opted for.

      Comment


      • #48
        Originally posted by Johan Banér View Post
        As someone said: the UK is not jumping off a cliff because there is no cliff, more like a low curb.
        Prices are set on the margins and there is a real danger of serious drops in prices for everything from food cars if there is a hard Brexit. While that may be good for consumers in the short term it won't do anyone any good in the longer term.
        The FT discusses a report from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research saying that Services exports will drop by 60% though" signing a free-trade agreement with the EU will not recoup any loss in services exports, but would reduce the long-term fall in goods exports from between 58-65 per cent to between 35-44 per cent"

        https://www.ft.com/content/bfe51444-...5-4e36b35c3550
        "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
        validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
        "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

        Comment


        • #49
          Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
          It is doubtful that as far as businesses go that others would suffer all that much. I mean the international agreements do set a ceiling to the costs that can be charged for overflying - of course landing agreements and that stuff are whole another story. So the biggest losers in such an arrangements would be the airlines which practically only work on the low cost basis. On bigger and more highly valued airlines - like BA - the effect ought to be visible only as increased ticket prices. They would probably need to cut back a bit - maybe even a fair bit - but it should not turn them belly up that is what i mean.

          After all like you said there will still be passengers for that transit. Likely even with the potentially slightly elevated costs.

          Nah, you don't understand. The threat is ALL civilian aircraft are banned from landing in the UK. That will have a devastating impact on the airline business and as a knock-on effect the airliner maker business.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Surrey View Post
            May has announced that she will take direct control of the negotiations over Brexit. Thus we can expect the U.K. to want to double the bar bill contribution to £78bn plus increase annual payments to several times what they are now. Insist that the UK is subject to the ECR for ever and demand that we have no say in any future EU legislation that effects us. And all will of course.
            This will be Theresa the appeasers Munich moment.
            Given the hubris of the EU 'negotiators' expect a Czechoslovakia '39 moment to follow though.

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by E.D. Morel View Post
              The options for the UK now seem to be the Brexiteers led by the "F*** Business" Boris Johnson, fundamentalists for the cause despite the economic damage it will do, and the Corbynites with their adolescent pseudo-marxist policies.
              I feel sorry for the UK.
              A socialist who attacks Corbynn

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Johan Banér View Post
                I have no idea how this will all pan out in the end, but I must say this OP seems indicative of a new sense of... urgency, I guess is the polite wording... on the UK side of things.

                As someone said: the UK is not jumping off a cliff because there is no cliff, more like a low curb. The problem however is that you need to at least jump to clear also a low curb, or else you risk falling flat on your face with potential GBH as a consequence. The UK can/could make this work in a manner of ways, but all of them would require determination and preparation in advance. And THAT seems to be the real danger looking ahead for the UK; lack of preparation for whatever specific future it could/should have opted for.
                You are right. The UK can make no deal work IF there is the right determination and vision. Lower taxes, lower tariffs, lower regulation, fixing a few necessary admin things like flying.
                The problem is May. She has the mentally of a senior public sector administrator in the civil service or NHS. She is brilliant at scheming, back stabbing, bullying and being seen to be in the right place at the right time. However like public sector managers her entire focus is internal, on getting and holding onto power. She has no external focus; no vision and behaves in a fawning and subservient manner when she meets powerful external individuals such as Merkel. Hence she will give in to any EU demands. The whole idea of the referendum in the first place was to end the continuos and damaging arguments over the EU once and for all. However May has managed to perpetuate them, revitalise UKIP and will give the next election to Corbyn and the Marxists.
                "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

                Comment


                • #53
                  Originally posted by Gooner View Post
                  Nah, you don't understand. The threat is ALL civilian aircraft are banned from landing in the UK. That will have a devastating impact on the airline business and as a knock-on effect the airliner maker business.
                  Only technically and only in the UK though (but not for domestic traffic within the UK). As stated previously UK is a signatory to an agreement which explicitly allows commercial aircraft from other signatories to overfly them. In similar manner UK aircraft can overfly Ireland - unless of course Ireland withdraws from IASTA (which i'm not even sure if it can do since it is part of the EASA/SES). Landing (for commercial purposes) is of course a different story but it would seem unlikely that even in the worst case that would be a permanent state - it might well result in a hickup at the real exit date but it would quite surprising if it went beyond that.
                  It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion, it is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed. The hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by Surrey View Post
                    You are right. The UK can make no deal work IF there is the right determination and vision. Lower taxes, lower tariffs, lower regulation, fixing a few necessary admin things like flying.
                    To be frank that would be quite disastrous route for the UK. At least in my opinion. Reason is simply that by trying to go below other tariffs and decreased regulation would in all likelihood make UK domestic produce (especially agriculture) less likely to be able to successfully compete. In practice outsourcing production while increasing the unemployment in the UK - at least in that sector. Which in other words means that especially agriculture would require more, not less, support - and hence more tax funds. At least to me that would seem to be a somewhat counterproductive action.

                    I'm not saying that such a route would not be possible or that it would not be possible for it to succeed but just that it ain't exactly as easy as it might first seem to be.
                    It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion, it is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed. The hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
                      Only technically and only in the UK though (but not for domestic traffic within the UK). As stated previously UK is a signatory to an agreement which explicitly allows commercial aircraft from other signatories to overfly them. In similar manner UK aircraft can overfly Ireland - unless of course Ireland withdraws from IASTA (which i'm not even sure if it can do since it is part of the EASA/SES). Landing (for commercial purposes) is of course a different story but it would seem unlikely that even in the worst case that would be a permanent state - it might well result in a hickup at the real exit date but it would quite surprising if it went beyond that.
                      Yes, in real life the airline thing is a non issue. It would be resolved with minimal fuss. The issue is that the EU in the form of their stooge the Irish PM is pretending it is an issue. There is a lot of this going around. The Amazon CEO said that there would be widespread civil unrest, the Earth would stop spinning on its axis, Britain would sink into the sea etc...
                      "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Surrey View Post
                        Yes, in real life the airline thing is a non issue. It would be resolved with minimal fuss. The issue is that the EU in the form of their stooge the Irish PM is pretending it is an issue. There is a lot of this going around. The Amazon CEO said that there would be widespread civil unrest, the Earth would stop spinning on its axis, Britain would sink into the sea etc...
                        Main issue i would guess has been some of the UK statements with regards to fisheries etc. - which also could be resolved with minimal fuss. Irish PM's just seems to be deliberately annoying the British because they have been deliberately (in his opinion) annoying Ireland. You pissed on his shoes so he pisses on your shoes.
                        It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion, it is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed. The hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
                          Main issue i would guess has been some of the UK statements with regards to fisheries etc. - which also could be resolved with minimal fuss. Irish PM's just seems to be deliberately annoying the British because they have been deliberately (in his opinion) annoying Ireland. You pissed on his shoes so he pisses on your shoes.
                          I think that's a fair assessment.
                          "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
                          validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
                          "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by Vaeltaja View Post
                            To be frank that would be quite disastrous route for the UK. At least in my opinion. Reason is simply that by trying to go below other tariffs and decreased regulation would in all likelihood make UK domestic produce (especially agriculture) less likely to be able to successfully compete. In practice outsourcing production while increasing the unemployment in the UK - at least in that sector. Which in other words means that especially agriculture would require more, not less, support - and hence more tax funds. At least to me that would seem to be a somewhat counterproductive action.

                            I'm not saying that such a route would not be possible or that it would not be possible for it to succeed but just that it ain't exactly as easy as it might first seem to be.
                            Agriculture is a tiny part of our economy employing few UK citizens. Protecting it is like the tail wagging the dog. Reducing tariffs on food will reduce food prices giving a real boost to effective incomes for everyone, stimulating demand in much the same way that a tax general reduction would.
                            "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Originally posted by Surrey View Post

                              Agriculture is a tiny part of our economy employing few UK citizens. Protecting it is like the tail wagging the dog. Reducing tariffs on food will reduce food prices giving a real boost to effective incomes for everyone, stimulating demand in much the same way that a tax general reduction would.
                              Does that mean you would like to see the UK importing more of its food?
                              "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
                              validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
                              "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Originally posted by ljadw View Post
                                A socialist who attacks Corbynn
                                That's right; anyone who disagrees with you is a socialist.
                                "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
                                validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
                                "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

                                Comment

                                Latest Topics

                                Collapse

                                Working...
                                X