Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Its the economy stu...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Its the economy stu...

    We have voted to leave and as a democrat leave we must.

    And I fully believe even though I disagree that what was voted for was to fully leave, not half leave.
    A points based immigration system like Australia included.

    This leads to think about trade.

    In doing this we simply have to become as important a trading nation as possible, strong player militarily,create a tight run fiscal ship and build a greater British sphere of influence.

    The idea of this thread is to shoot theon sensible and realistic ways we can do that,

    Obviously I was remain. But since I cant, its best to get behind the project.

    Imagine you are calling the shots in two years, whats your strategy?

    Just a brain storming session.

    The referendum is done, buried. time to move on.
    Sealion would have failed..............runs,

  • #2
    Invade France.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by UGLYGUTS View Post
      We have voted to leave and as a democrat leave we must.

      And I fully believe even though I disagree that what was voted for was to fully leave, not half leave.
      A points based immigration system like Australia included.

      This leads to think about trade.

      In doing this we simply have to become as important a trading nation as possible, strong player militarily,create a tight run fiscal ship and build a greater British sphere of influence.

      The idea of this thread is to shoot theon sensible and realistic ways we can do that,

      Obviously I was remain. But since I cant, its best to get behind the project.

      Imagine you are calling the shots in two years, whats your strategy?

      Just a brain storming session.

      The referendum is done, buried. time to move on.
      This depends greatly on negotiations with the EU, who represent what I believe was 50% of the UK's important and export market.

      Chaos, barriers, or other obstructions to that could play havoc with any attempt to create a trade powerhouse.

      Likewise, all the problems blamed on EU migrants may just remain unanswered if the UK concedes to EU demands for access to the common market. How the UK negotiates, what concessions it gives and what concessions it receives, are the crucial deciding factors.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by copenhagen View Post
        Invade France.
        But that means having to govern it and nobody in their right mind would want to do that (even De Gaulle was doubtful) - you'd have to be a not very bright German to take that on.Even the Tudors recognised that that was a nmugs game.
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
          But that means having to govern it and nobody in their right mind would want to do that (even De Gaulle was doubtful) - you'd have to be a not very bright German to take that on.
          Who said anything about governing it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Daemon of Decay View Post
            This depends greatly on negotiations with the EU, who represent what I believe was 50% of the UK's important and export market.

            Chaos, barriers, or other obstructions to that could play havoc with any attempt to create a trade powerhouse.

            Likewise, all the problems blamed on EU migrants may just remain unanswered if the UK concedes to EU demands for access to the common market. How the UK negotiates, what concessions it gives and what concessions it receives, are the crucial deciding factors.
            I understand, I am looking at this from a "lets say that initially we are stuck with WTO tariffs"

            In a situation where imports cost more due to tariffs, I am thinking that must provide great opportunities for simply servicing more of our internal market.

            Sure for raw things such as fuel, corn and tea we have to bight the bullet but for anything with value added, I am not talking protectionism as a rule, its just in a circumstance where say imported xmas trees have tariffs, a British grower should be able to undercut that, its just capitalism.
            The xmas tree example might not stand up to scrutiny.


            I think one of the main challenges will be re-creating the Foreign/diplomatic office of old, under the EU its obviously shrank in expertise and importance, but in the distant past it was one of our secret and not so secret weapons.

            On the sphere on influence, there is the Commonwealth, this needs a) expanding and b) to be more trade focused .

            I am currently penning a list of everything I can think of we have going for us, what we currently lack, pals in the World, enemies, rivals in various industries.

            As you say we are in an extreme state of flux, and with a positive Scots ref more flux may follow. I am think the prediction of a dodgy decade might not be far wrong.
            Sealion would have failed..............runs,

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by UGLYGUTS View Post
              I understand, I am looking at this from a "lets say that initially we are stuck with WTO tariffs"

              In a situation where imports cost more due to tariffs, I am thinking that must provide great opportunities for simply servicing more of our internal market.

              Sure for raw things such as fuel, corn and tea we have to bight the bullet but for anything with value added, I am not talking protectionism as a rule, its just in a circumstance where say imported xmas trees have tariffs, a British grower should be able to undercut that, its just capitalism.
              The xmas tree example might not stand up to scrutiny.


              I think one of the main challenges will be re-creating the Foreign/diplomatic office of old, under the EU its obviously shrank in expertise and importance, but in the distant past it was one of our secret and not so secret weapons.

              On the sphere on influence, there is the Commonwealth, this needs a) expanding and b) to be more trade focused .

              I am currently penning a list of everything I can think of we have going for us, what we currently lack, pals in the World, enemies, rivals in various industries.

              As you say we are in an extreme state of flux, and with a positive Scots ref more flux may follow. I am think the prediction of a dodgy decade might not be far wrong.
              The main problem will be for intermediary industries for example those producing car parts.

              British companies will have to compete with tariffs toward US, Europeans ane Japanese companies whose internal market provide equivalents products without tariffs.

              Moreover those companies will no longer benefits of a single set of EU regulations which provide harmonized standards and instead will have to handle differents standards.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by UGLYGUTS View Post
                I understand, I am looking at this from a "lets say that initially we are stuck with WTO tariffs"

                In a situation where imports cost more due to tariffs, I am thinking that must provide great opportunities for simply servicing more of our internal market.

                Sure for raw things such as fuel, corn and tea we have to bight the bullet but for anything with value added, I am not talking protectionism as a rule, its just in a circumstance where say imported xmas trees have tariffs, a British grower should be able to undercut that, its just capitalism.
                The xmas tree example might not stand up to scrutiny.


                I think one of the main challenges will be re-creating the Foreign/diplomatic office of old, under the EU its obviously shrank in expertise and importance, but in the distant past it was one of our secret and not so secret weapons.

                On the sphere on influence, there is the Commonwealth, this needs a) expanding and b) to be more trade focused .

                I am currently penning a list of everything I can think of we have going for us, what we currently lack, pals in the World, enemies, rivals in various industries.

                As you say we are in an extreme state of flux, and with a positive Scots ref more flux may follow. I am think the prediction of a dodgy decade might not be far wrong.
                On the Commoneealth - imperial preference was a non starter at the turn of the 20th century. Even less significant now. Only way foward is damage control. Have a Norway style agreement with the EU. The immigrants that the leavers hate won't be such if an issue as the economy will be worse with less jobs for them. They will be no saving in contribution as access to the single market has a cost.
                "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Britain currently has 65 food products that have a protected geographical indication under EU rules ranging from Melton Mobray Pork Pies, Jersey Royal Potatoes, Cornish Pasties to Scotch Whiskey. On exit these protections will lapse. I would think that Scotch will have be biggest impact as anyone will then be able to label their Whiskey and sell it in the EU as Scotch. An interesting situation will arise with Irish Whisky as the protected staus currently applies to the Island of Ireland. On exit it would seem that Whisky made in the Republic will still be able to be sold in the EU as Irish Whisky but that made in Northern Ireland will not!
                  Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                  Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by copenhagen View Post
                    Invade France.
                    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                    Britain currently has 65 food products that have a protected geographical indication under EU rules ranging from Melton Mobray Pork Pies, Jersey Royal Potatoes, Cornish Pasties to Scotch Whiskey. On exit these protections will lapse. I would think that Scotch will have be biggest impact as anyone will then be able to label their Whiskey and sell it in the EU as Scotch. An interesting situation will arise with Irish Whisky as the protected staus currently applies to the Island of Ireland. On exit it would seem that Whisky made in the Republic will still be able to be sold in the EU as Irish Whisky but that made in Northern Ireland will not!
                    So in principle. All European foods with geographical protection would no longer have such protection here either?
                    ie the British could make and sell domestically for example Parma Ham.
                    Sealion would have failed..............runs,

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The scotch whiskey tragedy of 2016 . We're doomed!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by UGLYGUTS View Post
                        So in principle. All European foods with geographical protection would no longer have such protection here either?
                        ie the British could make and sell domestically for example Parma Ham.
                        Much smaller market
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                          Britain currently has 65 food products that have a protected geographical indication under EU rules ranging from Melton Mobray Pork Pies, Jersey Royal Potatoes, Cornish Pasties to Scotch Whiskey. On exit these protections will lapse. I would think that Scotch will have be biggest impact as anyone will then be able to label their Whiskey and sell it in the EU as Scotch. An interesting situation will arise with Irish Whisky as the protected staus currently applies to the Island of Ireland. On exit it would seem that Whisky made in the Republic will still be able to be sold in the EU as Irish Whisky but that made in Northern Ireland will not!
                          Article 50 takes 2 years because of these things. You don't need to be in the EU to protect your stuff.

                          https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...africa-deal-eu
                          you think you a real "bleep" solders you "bleep" plastic solders don't wory i will make you in to real "bleep" solders!! "bleep" plastic solders

                          CPO Mzinyati

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                            Much smaller market
                            Agreed. Although British cuisine staples are not quite as marketable , show me a Frenchman pining for a pork pie!

                            I work in food so was particularly caught by your point.

                            Artisan Absinthe maker might end up on my resume!
                            Sealion would have failed..............runs,

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by andrewza View Post
                              Article 50 takes 2 years because of these things. You don't need to be in the EU to protect your stuff.

                              https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...africa-deal-eu
                              Wrong - according to current statements by the Commission we can't start negotiating on new trade arrangements (such as these) until after the two years are up and we have exited! So there will be a period when the old protections have gone and no new ones have been agreed and implemented even if, the commission has confirmed, this also hurts European businesses as well. May take years. It would have been nice if the leavers had told us these things before the vote!
                              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X