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Total shambles: lame duck leaders, no exit plan, no exit team, Boris dumbstruck

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  • Total shambles: lame duck leaders, no exit plan, no exit team, Boris dumbstruck

    Total shambles: lame duck leaders, no exit plan, no exit team, Boris dumbstruck:

    Boy when things go wrong!

    Come on!!!

    They don't have a friggin' plan B ????!!
    Something which would start to be activated the day after an exit vote passed?
    Like bloody Von Schlieffen - no contingency plan if things didn't work out like they wanted?

    The Brexit mob doesn't have a plan either! Got what they wanted....err..ummm....now what?
    Keep calm and carry on I suppose?

    Governing and opposition parties fractured and split, both leaders on way out but not quite yet!
    In the meantime the EU itself can't wait for the UK and what they see as its disingenuous commitment to the European idea to be gone.

    Boris baby the leader of the pack looking more befuddled at each media-byte.

    The will of the people Give me strength!

    Now if i'd been in charge.

    Regards
    lodestar

  • #2
    He thinks he can still stay in the common market. Dont think he knows that he has zero say in what the break look likes
    you think you a real "bleep" solders you "bleep" plastic solders don't wory i will make you in to real "bleep" solders!! "bleep" plastic solders

    CPO Mzinyati

    Comment


    • #3
      Part of the problem, Lodestar, is that Cameron repeatedly let it be suggested that he would invoke Article 50 the morning after the referendum. Instead, he resigned without doing so - the last act of what has been a useless Prime Minister. As a result, politically speaking, everyone must now wait until November when the Conservatives elect a new leader and - ipso facto - a new Prime Minister. Thank Cameron for effectively leaving the country in limbo for the next four months, during which there is every possibility that either there will be serious efforts to annul the referendum in some manner or that the country will merely implode..

      Comment


      • #4
        Have you seen this ?

        Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

        Comment


        • #5
          Sturgeon apparently knows what she wants for Scotland, whether she can get it or not. One of few who seems to have thought ahead in Britain.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lodestar View Post
            Total shambles: lame duck leaders, no exit plan, no exit team, Boris dumbstruck:

            Boy when things go wrong!

            Come on!!!

            They don't have a friggin' plan B ????!!
            Something which would start to be activated the day after an exit vote passed?
            Like bloody Von Schlieffen - no contingency plan if things didn't work out like they wanted?

            The Brexit mob doesn't have a plan either! Got what they wanted....err..ummm....now what?
            Keep calm and carry on I suppose?

            Governing and opposition parties fractured and split, both leaders on way out but not quite yet!
            In the meantime the EU itself can't wait for the UK and what they see as its disingenuous commitment to the European idea to be gone.

            Boris baby the leader of the pack looking more befuddled at each media-byte.

            The will of the people Give me strength!

            Now if i'd been in charge.

            Regards
            lodestar
            If you'd been in charge the country would have gone to sleep listening to you talk about yourself all the time .

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Johan Banér View Post
              Sturgeon apparently knows what she wants for Scotland, whether she can get it or not. One of few who seems to have thought ahead in Britain.
              There's not much thinking ahead in advocating independence in a country that runs massive budget deficits and is dependent on fiscal transfers from the rest of the UK.

              In fact it's about as forward thinking as asking Greeks to vote for a socialist government that will reverse austerity, and then asking them again to veto a bailout deal that would have rescued them from the consequences of the first vote.

              Scottish independence is an even more ridiculous idea than Brexit.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Hop View Post
                ...

                Scottish independence is an even more ridiculous idea than Brexit.
                May be but for now Scottish independence is a possibility while Brexit is a fact.

                Lodestar point remain valid : what is Leave road map for Brexit ? For now it is quite difficult to discern.

                Comment


                • #9
                  They don't have a friggin' plan B ????!!
                  Something which would start to be activated the day after an exit vote passed?
                  Like bloody Von Schlieffen - no contingency plan if things didn't work out like they wanted?
                  There's no plan because Brexit has removed power from the UK and handed it to the EU. We are now waiting to see what the EU response will be, because we have no real bargaining power left.

                  Plus, I think most politicians are so flabbergasted that they have no idea what to do. Brexit is such a bad idea they honestly didn't believe it would ever happen.

                  The Brexit mob doesn't have a plan either! Got what they wanted....err..ummm....now what?
                  Keep calm and carry on I suppose?
                  All the options are worse than what we have now. No one really wants to end up with the responsibility of choosing which bad options we go for.

                  One thing you can guarantee, a year from now, when it's become apparent just how bad Brexit is, the public will blame the politicians and ignore the fact that they forced this decision on them.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    God you'd think this was the blitz with the way some people go on.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Hop View Post
                      There's no plan because Brexit has removed power from the UK and handed it to the EU. We are now waiting to see what the EU response will be, because we have no real bargaining power left.

                      Plus, I think most politicians are so flabbergasted that they have no idea what to do. Brexit is such a bad idea they honestly didn't believe it would ever happen.



                      All the options are worse than what we have now. No one really wants to end up with the responsibility of choosing which bad options we go for.

                      One thing you can guarantee, a year from now, when it's become apparent just how bad Brexit is, the public will blame the politicians and ignore the fact that they forced this decision on them.

                      You dont have a plan to deal with the rest off the world either though. No one has any trade deals with you it all through the EU so you gonna have to start fresh to set up all of those deals. EU only needs to set up how they want to treat the UK i suspect not nicely.


                      Artical 50 has not yet beern implementef yet though
                      you think you a real "bleep" solders you "bleep" plastic solders don't wory i will make you in to real "bleep" solders!! "bleep" plastic solders

                      CPO Mzinyati

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Hop View Post
                        There's no plan because Brexit has removed power from the UK and handed it to the EU. We are now waiting to see what the EU response will be, because we have no real bargaining power left.
                        Except the other 27 can do bugger all about the situation until the British signal some kind of clearer intention about the "hows" of it.

                        It IS what "control" looks like as set up by this referendum. It's just that the idea of control is mistaken. What the ref has set up is a situation of uncertanity. Anyone who knows what they DO want tends to find opportunities in times of uncertanity. But if you don't....

                        But IF the British feel as if the rest of the EU suddenly is in control, then they are sadly mistaken. And that is rather a SAD comment about the state of the UK then. At best there are fringe groups and political minorities around the EU that might have liked the outcome (Le Pen in France etc.), but no one else in the EU had any wish or desire for this.

                        If the British feels the EU is now "in charge", it might as well be interpreted as a possibly unconscious British desire for the EU to take charge and actually TELL the UK what it should bloody well do now. Becuase the EU can't, and won't. It's all up to the British themselves to work this one out.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Except the other 27 can do bugger all about the situation until the British signal some kind of clearer intention about the "hows" of it.
                          They could begin negotiating behind the scenes. The smoothest possible transition would be for a deal to be negotiated via back channels, and not announced until it was agreed.

                          But IF the British feel as if the rest of the EU suddenly is in control, then they are sadly mistaken. And that is rather a SAD comment about the state of the UK then. At best there are fringe groups and political minorities around the EU that might have liked the outcome (Le Pen in France etc.), but no one else in the EU had any wish or desire for this.
                          I'm not suggesting this is what the EU wanted. But the referendum result puts the UK in a very weak position. The last thing the UK government wants is 2 years of negotiation against a ticking clock and carried out in public. That would put the UK in massive difficulties, having to agree a bad deal quickly rather than face the damage uncertainty would cause.

                          If the British feels the EU is now "in charge", it might as well be interpreted as a possibly unconscious British desire for the EU to take charge and actually TELL the UK what it should bloody well do now. Becuase the EU can't, and won't. It's all up to the British themselves to work this one out.
                          It's not up to the UK because the key to all this is the deal between the EU and UK. If there isn't going to be a deal, just the UK out, trading with the EU under WTO rules, then a UK government might decide the price of withdrawing is too high.

                          Basically the UK government would like to know the withdrawal terms before it commits itself to withdrawing. Whether or not the rest of the EU agrees to go along with that is up to them, but I do think it would be in everyone's best interests to ensure a quick, orderly transition.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Hop View Post
                            They could begin negotiating behind the scenes. The smoothest possible transition would be for a deal to be negotiated via back channels, and not announced until it was agreed.
                            Isn't that what everyone agrees we don't want? Less transparency, back-room deals, even more of a democratic deficit... And it would still need to be all 27 involved. The Foreign Office really should get cracking.
                            Originally posted by Hop View Post
                            I'm not suggesting this is what the EU wanted. But the referendum result puts the UK in a very weak position. The last thing the UK government wants is 2 years of negotiation against a ticking clock and carried out in public. That would put the UK in massive difficulties, having to agree a bad deal quickly rather than face the damage uncertainty would cause.
                            Welcome to emergent situations.

                            Which is worse, an OK deal today or holding our for what is hoped to be a "perfect" deal later — as weighed against the effects of a short period of uncertanity as opposed to a protracted period? Wait too long, and facts on the ground might shift in surprising and unaticipated ways around you, while you hold out for that better deal.
                            Originally posted by Hop View Post
                            It's not up to the UK because the key to all this is the deal between the EU and UK. If there isn't going to be a deal, just the UK out, trading with the EU under WTO rules, then a UK government might decide the price of withdrawing is too high.
                            Supposedly the referendum says it is not.
                            Originally posted by Hop View Post
                            Basically the UK government would like to know the withdrawal terms before it commits itself to withdrawing. Whether or not the rest of the EU agrees to go along with that is up to them, but I do think it would be in everyone's best interests to ensure a quick, orderly transition.
                            The other EU member states would also like to know what the devil the UK envisages here. No one made the UK take this step.

                            If the UK wanted to know in advance, its government clearly would have needed to first negotiate the terms. (As if that would have been politically possible I guess.)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by copenhagen View Post
                              God you'd think this was the blitz with the way some people go on.
                              We're seeing deep-seated insecurities being vocalized. In their heart of hearts they know the EU is in trouble.
                              Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

                              Comment

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