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"I think European countries have been too soft, and they are paying the price for it"

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  • "I think European countries have been too soft, and they are paying the price for it"

    So says Abu Dhabi-based scholar Dr. Jamal Sanad al-Suwaidi. Sweden is one of the most secular countries in the world. It’s also the EU nation which, per capita, takes in the most refugees from the Middle East.

    And as “attacks” of various kinds like those in Paris and Cologne make the world ever warier, Sweden is facing a challenge: How much can the country actually take?

    “I think European countries have been too soft, and they are paying the price for it,” says Abu Dhabi-based scholar Dr. Jamal Sanad al-Suwaidi.

    Al-Suwaidi is Director General of the Emirates Center for Strategic Studies and Research (ECSSR), as well as the author of numerous articles and books. His latest work, The Mirage, focuses on the phenomenon of radical political Islam, its causes, and how it should be addressed.

    In the book, he argues that using intellect and not just military power is critical to overcoming extremism. The very title of the book is a metaphor for the deceptive remedies radical religious groups claim can solve contemporary social problems.

    He describes the current political climate in the Middle East as similar to Europe in the Middle Ages - a time when religion ruled and those who spoke out against the church were persecuted.

    But the Western world has been naïve in handling the phenomenon, he says. And the problem is deeply rooted.

    http://www.thelocal.se/20160321/if-y...idi-ecss-tlccu
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

  • #2
    The West is viewed as soft and weak, and rightfully so. We let our enemies simply walk into our midst, and we pay them with welfare, while they laugh and build bombs.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Charger View Post
      The West is viewed as soft and weak, and rightfully so. We let our enemies simply walk into our midst, and we pay them with welfare, while they laugh and build bombs.
      The interesting thing about the article is the man who wrote it...
      Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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      • #4
        This is exactly what I was thinking when I think about the Middle East's political and religious climate for about 2 years, Islam needs their own reformation.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Mattdaman354 View Post
          This is exactly what I was thinking when I think about the Middle East's political and religious climate for about 2 years, Islam needs their own reformation.
          The reformation in Europe produced one of the longest, bitterest and bloodiest wars the continent has seen - the 30 Years War and there was an increase in religious fanaticism until the dawn of the Age of Reason in the 18th Century. The Wahhabi believe that they are an Islamic reformation - taking it back to a purer more original form in much the same way as some of the original Christian reformationists believed they were doing.

          I think we need something different to a reformation in the ME - its a secularisation and that is going to be immensely difficult to achieve
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by MarkV View Post
            The reformation in Europe produced one of the longest, bitterest and bloodiest wars the continent has seen - the 30 Years War and there was an increase in religious fanaticism until the dawn of the Age of Reason in the 18th Century. The Wahhabi believe that they are an Islamic reformation - taking it back to a purer more original form in much the same way as some of the original Christian reformationists believed they were doing.

            I think we need something different to a reformation in the ME - its a secularisation and that is going to be immensely difficult to achieve
            It would be hard but that is there best opstion
            you think you a real "bleep" solders you "bleep" plastic solders don't wory i will make you in to real "bleep" solders!! "bleep" plastic solders

            CPO Mzinyati

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MarkV View Post
              The reformation in Europe produced one of the longest, bitterest and bloodiest wars the continent has seen - the 30 Years War and there was an increase in religious fanaticism until the dawn of the Age of Reason in the 18th Century. The Wahhabi believe that they are an Islamic reformation - taking it back to a purer more original form in much the same way as some of the original Christian reformationists believed they were doing.

              I think we need something different to a reformation in the ME - its a secularisation and that is going to be immensely difficult to achieve
              Good luck selling secularism to the Muslim world. In some places you may be arrested or worse for even suggesting it.

              Islam' s best hope is its contact with the West and a more moderate strain of Islam being imported back in some happier future. Islam does have peaceful strains in the Ahmadi, who are predictably persecuted by other Muslims. Islam is not yet ready for peace and love in its heartlands.
              Ne Obliviscaris, Sans Peur

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                I think we need something different to a reformation in the ME - its a secularisation and that is going to be immensely difficult to achieve
                I don't think secularism is required for peace, rather its religious freedom and separation of church and state. The first person to think of those 2 points were not from a deist by the name of Thomas Jefferson, it was the first Baptist of the United States that goes by the name of Roger Williams. What is interesting is that he was persecuted much like the Quakers from Protestant Separatists, the Protestants saw them as heretics and the not real Christianity much like how "moderate" Muslims view ISIS as "twisted version of Islam."

                Important to note, secularization could also mean Communist China where only a few select religions are permitted to be practiced. The freedom to practice any religion is a basic human right. Separation of church and state is NOT a secular policy; after all, the USSR broke the separation of church and state when the state breached through that wall by forcing the East Orthodox Church what they can or cannot say and ultimately brought down their church as concern for opposing the USSR.

                Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                Islam' s best hope is its contact with the West and a more moderate strain of Islam being imported back in some happier future. Islam does have peaceful strains in the Ahmadi, who are predictably persecuted by other Muslims. Islam is not yet ready for peace and love in its heartlands.
                Maybe the Ahmadi are the Baptists and Quakers of the Middle East, I sure hope they do change Islam from the inside out...
                Last edited by Mattdaman354; 03 Apr 16, 19:55.

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