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  • Breaking: South Blames North Korea for Sinking

    Seems pretty obvious, but it took them a while to put the pieces together. A Chinese torpedo was the culprit.

    South Korea's foreign minister bluntly blamed the March sinking of the Cheonan warship and the death of 46 sailors on North Korea Wednesday.

    We have the evidence, Foreign Minister Yu Myung-hwan told the Monitor. Asked how South Korea would respond, Mr. Yu promised very firm action but avoided specifics.

    Yu's comments came a day before the release of the results of an inquiry into the sinking of the Cheonan. But with Seoul already making it clear that North Korea fired the torpedo that sank the Cheonan the question is: What will the South do about it?
    http://www.csmonitor.com/World/2010/...sanctions-next
    Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

    I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

  • #2
    I heard about this on Cspan at a State Department briefing before the Post broke the story. Huge News. It is an act of war, but do they really want to start one over this? Tough choice. A real provocation.

    Can't someone just send some covert ops to go decapitate North Korean leadership? Those people need to die anyway. Preferably from starvation.

    Comment


    • #3
      I had put this in a different thread today:

      Andrew Salmon (Andy_S on this forum) has a really good article on CNN regarding the expected announcement that an investigation has revealed that North Korea did indeed sink the Korean Naval ship Choenon, which appears to have been torpedoed.

      http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/asiapc....html?hpt=Sbin

      With elections looming in Korea, this is morphing into a 'political issue', since the main party in opposition is the Party that gave South Korea ten years of denial over any existence of a real North Korean threat. Some informed commentary, as well as the occasional misinformed blurb, can be found on 'The Marmot's Hole' here: (note that the comments cover several topics)

      http://www.rjkoehler.com/2010/05/19/...tion/#comments
      dit: Lirelou

      Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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      • #4
        This is a huge problem to South Korea. North Korea sunk one of their warships, now what? They either take military action with all the horrible consequences, or do nothing (surely all non-military options are already taken since ages) which is also terrible because no country wants to let someone walk away after sinking a ship.

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        • #5
          People died. How can they just ignore this? On the other hand, perhaps NK is trying to start a war?

          Are the Norks hoping for some suicidal excuse to use nukes by any chance?

          I have one question. When was the last time those useful idiots in the South protested the American presence in S Korea? Because I have no trouble with us living up to our alliance as long as this has not been going on. Otherwise we should take our toys and go home and let them handle it.

          Since last month, the U.S. military has believed a North Korean torpedo attack was the most likely cause of the explosion, according to a U.S. military official. The military official said at the time that the blast of an underwater explosion sank the ship, but that the explosive device itself did not come in contact with the hull of the South Korean ship.


          The United States has a mutual defense treaty with South Korea and Japan to defend "against any aggression," so if a military confrontation develops, the United States would be responsible for defending South Korea, the official said.
          Last edited by Miss Saigon; 19 May 10, 18:36.

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          • #6
            There was no doubt in my mind that it was the NK's from day one. The question how to respond. Do nohing, drive north and finish the job from the first time or find some middle ground. Hypothetically speaking say this triggers a military response and the 57 year lod cease fire goes ou the window waht will the U.S. do? And what are the odds of Chinese intervention?
            "The first time those bastards encounter US Marines, I want it to be the most traumatic experience of their miserable lives."
            -Gen. James Mattis, USMC

            Psalms 144.1

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            • #7
              I don't think South Korea will do anything now. My guess is they will make preparations to respond instantly with significant force to another Korean action, and this time it will be a heavy response. This way they will be seen as responding to North Korean aggression.

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              • #8
                North Korean Torpedo confirmed

                The South Koreans claim they have proof that the North deliberately torpedoed and sank one of its warships. This could escalate very quickly into something very serious.. its one thing to exchange gunfire over fishing trawlers but this raises tensions to a different level. The SKs are pissed off no doubt and I expect some serious retaliation at the slightest NK provocation.


                http://www.foxnews.com/world/2010/05...est=latestnews

                SKorean president vows 'stern action' against NKorea over sinking of warship
                Associated Press



                SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean President Lee Myung-bak has vowed to take "stern action" against North Korea over the sinking of a South Korean warship.

                The presidential Blue House said Thursday that Lee made the pledge during a phone call with Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd.

                SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Investigators in Seoul say they have proof that North Korea fired a torpedo that sank a South Korean warship.

                The long-awaited investigation results released Thursday say the torpedo caused a massive underwater explosion that blew the ship apart on March 26.

                Forty-six sailors died in the explosion, South Korea's worst military disaster since the Korean War of the 1950s.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Threads Merged

                  ACG Staff
                  On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

                  ACG History Today

                  BoRG

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                  • #10
                    BBC has a link to the 5 page synopsis of the report.

                    http://news.bbc.co.uk/nol/shared/bsp...0jigreport.pdf

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                    • #11
                      "The military official said at the time that the blast of an underwater explosion sank the ship, but that the explosive device itself did not come in contact with the hull of the South Korean ship."

                      I'm not an expert in naval warfare, but is it possible, since this wasn't a direct hit, that the Norks had standing orders to scare off the southern ship, shake it a little in defiance?
                      The torpedo equivalent of dropping a depth charge just close enough to be heard but far enough not to be fatal. Maybe they screwed up, sank the ship.
                      Sinking a warship is a really agressive move. Though the Norks are that crazy I guess. Maybe the population is finally revolting and the crazies incharge want to provoke an attack to unite the people against the "agressor".

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        For those who deem Kim Jong-il 'crazy'. The view from a Russian expert who speaks, reads, and writes Korean, and studied at Kim Il-sung University in Pyongyang.

                        http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news...137_66212.html

                        For the record, there is no reason to worry about whether or not this was carried out by 'rogue elements', or if it was meant as a 'warning' gone awry. A State is responsible for the acts carried out by its armed forces. There is a good chance that those who carried this out will soon no longer be numbered among the living. As to the fate of he who ordered this, that is another matter.
                        dit: Lirelou

                        Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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                        • #13
                          Some additional thoughts from one of our bloggers;

                          What if war comes anyway? It would be a bloody mess, but its hard to see anything other than a very convincing victory by South Korea. North Korea has numbers on its side lots of very lightly armed leg infantry, most of who suffer from chronic malnutrition. (Young North Korean men are, on average, four inches shorter than South Korean men of the same age due to chronic malnutrition.) North Korea has a fleet of tanks mostly consisting of barely-operational T-55s, designed and built over a half century ago.

                          Its air force is nearly as dated, with 70s era MiG-21s a first line fighters and two ground attack regiments still flying MiG-17 Frescos.

                          MiG-17 Frescos! When you talk about classic war birds, its tough to top the Fresco. Man, I love that plane, but its another 50s era piece of equipment. It belongs in a museum, not on a combat flight line.
                          http://greathistory.com/korean-crisis-growing.htm
                          Our forefathers died to give us freedom, not free stuff.

                          I write books about zombies as E.E. Isherwood. Check me out at ZombieBooks.net.

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                          • #14
                            What about the Chinese dimension? Their response, alone out of all the official responses I've read, doesn't condemn the action. No doubt they want to avoid a conflict but if it did come to blows is there any chance of them wading in again?

                            Are the US forces stretched to far to contemplate a major ground war at this time?

                            Would some kind of punitive "shock and awe" aerial campaign be a happy medium or would that lead to waves of cannon fodder flowing south?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Siberian HEAT View Post
                              Seems pretty obvious, but it took them a while to put the pieces together. A Chinese torpedo was the culprit.



                              http://www.csmonitor.com/World/2010/...sanctions-next

                              Hello Siberuab HEAT

                              Where does it say a chinese torpedo was the culprit?


                              Gman
                              "We have no white flag."

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