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How Should US Deal with China Long-term?

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  • So not only they're separatists, but they also bastardised with the enemy.
    There are no Nazis in Ukraine. Idiots

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    • Please avoid personal comments.
      Thanks
      ACG Staff

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      • The Philippines have decided not to terminate a forces agreement with the US. Apparently they are getting tired of the games China is playing in the Spratly Islands area.

        Link to CNN article, excerpt.

        https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/03/asia/...hnk/index.html

        excerpt

        In the past two months, the People's Liberation Army has moved advanced anti-submarine warfare and reconnaissance aircraft to Fiery Cross Reef, known as Kagitingan in the Philippines, in the Spratly Islands chain.
        Beijing has also made Fiery Cross part of its southern Hainan province, creating two new administrative districts covering the South China Sea that are headquartered in the Paracel Islands, another island group with disputed claims.
        Additionally, China has maintained a presence of maritime militia vessels around Thitu Island, the largest Philippine occupied island in the Spratly archipelago, for well over a year, according to the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative.
        An average of 18 Chinese vessels have been around the island each day, according to an AMTI satellite analysis published in March, hampering Philippine attempts to build up infrastructure there.On Wednesday, Locsin indicated that the Philippines sees the US playing a role in the region for some time to come.

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        • From CNN, 2016, link to an article which reports on The International Court of Justice deciding that China had no right to the Islands in Spratly Islands area (South China Sea: Court Rules In Favor of the Philippines Over China) . Following that several excerpts, including one from Chief Thug Xi Jinping, who said China will never acknowledge the decision.

          So much for being part of the community of nations.

          https://www.cnn.com/2016/07/12/asia/...sea/index.html

          excerpt 1

          Hong Kong (CNN)An international tribunal in The Hague ruled in favor of the Philippines in a maritime dispute Tuesday, concluding China has no legal basis to claim historic rights to the bulk of the South China Sea.

          Chinese President Xi Jinping rejected the decision by the Permanent Court of Arbitration, which is likely to have lasting implications for the resource-rich hot spot, which sees $5 trillion worth of shipborne trade pass through each year.
          "China will never accept any claim or action based on those awards," Xi said. China had boycotted the proceedings.

          excerpt 2

          tate Department spokesman John Kirby asserted that the United States, and the world, expect China to commit to nonmilitarization. "The world is watching to see if China is really the global power it professes itself to be, and the responsible power that it professes itself to be," Kirby said.

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          • From Japan Times - Countering Beijing's South China Sea Strategy


            Written by Yoji Koda - Former Commander-in-Chief of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force

            https://www.japantimes.co.jp/opinion.../#.XtgO7p6SlPY

            excerpt

            An advantage of the two nations is their geographic location in relation to the Paracel and Spratly Islands. Vietnam’s coastline is an ideal location to check and control Hainan Island and Woody Island in the Paracels, while Palawan Island of the Philippines is in an optimum location to cover all the artificial islands in the Spratlys.

            Many strategic thinkers simply draw arcs of missile-shooting range from China’s artificial islands, and explain the potential dangers. However, a similar but reversed situation would emerge if Vietnam and the Philippines properly deployed land-attack missiles with sufficient firing range to reach the artificial islands. If this were to be done, China’s islands, which have been regarded as “game changers” in the South China Sea, could be described as a group of helpless frogs confronted by big snakes!

            For Vietnam, there is another naval strategy which could be developed. That is, an isolation operation against Woody Island. Woody Island is China’s “Capital Island” in the South China Sea, and it is the first stepping stone to the south. Vietnam should develop a strategy and plan to deploy its six Kilo-class submarines for this purpose. Were it to do so, China’s logistic capabilities to support the southern islands would be substantially reduced.
            Last edited by lakechampainer; 03 Jun 20, 16:27.

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            • Link to an article in foreignpolicy.com which I found interesting, titled, "China's Over-rated Technocrats"

              Excerpts follow

              https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/07/04...ng-xi-jinping/


              Excerpt 1

              Many Western parliaments are dominated by people with law degrees, but China’s leaders are mostly trained as engineers and scientists—or so goes conventional wisdom. Advocates for this supposed Chinese approach, such as the entrepreneur Elon Musk, argue that it produces leaders who adopt a pragmatic and technocratic framework to solving problems. And those scientist-politicians, the theory goes, are more likely to govern efficiently, in part because they are unburdened by ideology.

              But advocates for China’s supposed technocracy are not only wrong about the background of Beijing’s current leadership. They are also fundamentally mistaken about how their training shapes policymaking. China’s leaders today—including President Xi Jinping himself—have been molded less by their education and more by the need to consolidate control and prevail in the brutal internal power struggles of the Chinese Communist Party.


              Excerpt 2

              Education matters less than most observers think. China is not like the West, where a rigorous degree in law or economics often leads to a career that in turn becomes a path to politics, such as former U.S. President Bill Clinton’s days teaching law or London Mayor Sadiq Khan’s human rights work. For some Chinese officials, their schooling was cursory at best—and very rarely translated into actual work experience. As the Carnegie Mellon University professor Vivek Wadhwa and others have demonstrated, the quality of engineering education in China, especially before 2010, was well below international standards. Many engineering degrees would barely qualify as technical certificates in the United States.

              Although Xi nominally graduated with a degree in chemical engineering from the prestigious Tsinghua University in 1979, his curriculum contained an outsized number of classes on Marxism rather than mechanics, as was common at the tail end of the Cultural Revolution. And Xi never worked as an engineer. As the son of Xi Zhongxun, one of the founders of the People’s Republic of China, his first job out of college was as a personal secretary to a high-ranking government official, his father’s friend Geng Biao. Like many other so-called princelings, Xi was fast-tracked to power, and his career was entirely contained within, and shaped by, officialdom.

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              • From chinaworker.info: Has the Pandemic Strengthened or Weakened Xi Jinping?

                https://chinaworker.info/en/2020/06/21/23947/

                Excerpt

                In fact, a leaked internal report of the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR), a think-tank affiliated to the Ministry of State Security, warned that the rising global tide of anti-China sentiment in the wake of Covid-19 is the worst since the Tiananmen massacre of June 1989. The leak itself, published by Reuters in May, could be connected to the intensifying power struggle within the Chinese regime.

                It is clear that a growing wing of the CCP regime are increasingly disquieted by the aggressive “wolf warrior” diplomacy which has become the new normal for China’s foreign diplomats in 2020. This flows from Xi’s increasing dependence on ever more nationalistic policies (on the pandemic, the South China Sea, the US-China conflict, Hong Kong and Taiwan) in order to drum up domestic support and divert attention from the crippled economy.

                This is a dangerous dynamic as underlined by the conflict on the border with India in the high reaches of the Himalayas (Ladakh region), where Chinese and Indian troops have clashed repeatedly since early May. In June this conflict escalated with 20 Indian soldiers killed while China has refused to reveal its own casualties. While the two sides have clashed before these were the first fatalities for 45 years.

                Both governments – almost like a mirror image of each other – rely heavily on nationalism to shore up their rule, something the pandemic has accentuated. Both sides have recently strengthened their defences and infrastructure on each side of the disputed border. The recent conflict is an attempt by both sides to increase pressure on each other before eventual negotiations, as took place in Wuhan in 2018. Neither Delhi or Beijing are looking to go to war, but both sides’ actions are infecting old wounds.


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                • whilst neither are ideal, i dont believe a major national incident should be inevitable from these incidents.

                  Whats happend to Hong Kong had a sense of inevitability; i guess this is what Taiwan has always seen in Chinas actions against itself..

                  Im hearing stories of extradition of Hong Kong citizens across the globe since these new laws have been imposed. Good to know Western countires will get that immigration jolt to their Real Estate industries via other" means..

                  Australia has a lot of empty apartments its keen to sell to someone, anyone....post COVID lockdown....suppose a few thousand HK expats will do..

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                  • but what can i say;bloody Governments...im kinda sick of the lot of them frankly..

                    Imagine if China did a FoN exercise in the Gulf of Mexico..id have a sneaky grin on my face now imagining the press on that..

                    Instead, its the US needing its next near-peer competitior to keep those defence tax payer dollars rolling in...

                    I find it amusing that the US & China act like they have been historic rivals for generaitons but they arent...i get the animosity with Japan, i get the differences with SK and Taiwan....even the UK...but the US...?

                    I wish the people of China well; i dont know if i can say their leaders have done a good job setting up their children for the future. The society they are embarking on is truly nightmare stuff.

                    Oh, and finally, something i came across years ago, didnt pay it much heed but not so sure anymore..

                    its estimated by 2030 (not far away) China will host the largest number of Christians on Earth

                    https://www.cfr.org/backgrounder/christianity-china

                    I cant help but think this, not the US, is the biggest single issue for the CCP government...

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Galland View Post

                      I find it amusing that the US & China act like they have been historic rivals for generaitons but they arent...i get the animosity with Japan, i get the differences with SK and Taiwan....even the UK...but the US...?
                      Probably to do with our continued support for Taiwan.

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                      • Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                        Probably to do with our continued support for Taiwan.
                        could well be.....and yet if thats ALL it is...surely grounds to compromise..? or at least talk about differences etc...

                        Well...thats how a Westerner would see it i guess....

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                        • Originally posted by Galland View Post

                          could well be.....and yet if thats ALL it is...surely grounds to compromise..? or at least talk about differences etc...

                          Well...thats how a Westerner would see it i guess....
                          Compromise? China wants to be the top dog, both economically and militarily. All the people crying now about how "mean" and "bossy" the US is will be pining about the "good ole days" in 20-30 years.

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                          • Chinese doesn't force the ideology on others.
                            There are no Nazis in Ukraine. Idiots

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                            • Originally posted by Emtos View Post
                              Chinese doesn't force the ideology on others.
                              No, just its power.

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                              • Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                                No, just its power.
                                US does the same but it much more annoying manner.
                                There are no Nazis in Ukraine. Idiots

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