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How Should US Deal with China Long-term?

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  • I figured something was up about 20 years ago sitting in the lobby of a mid-range hotel in Laos when three Chinese businessmen entered, looked at the rooms they had reserved, decided they weren't good enough and instead checked into the high-end hotel on the river.

    Until that time, I had thought of the Chinese as desperately poor rural peasants.

    Discussing that with one of the hotel staff, he commented,

    "In the future, we will all be slaves of the Chinese!"

    I think he meant me, too....


    Philip
    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."— Bertrand Russell

    Comment


    • I'm wondering what happened to ChinaDan.

      If he got caught, its a good bet that we will never hear from him again.
      I wonder why this never occurred to the rest of you.

      Comment


      • Hi there. I am back using a proxy to access the site. I had a little trouble with my previous version, so I had to find a new one that would work. It allows me to hide my IP address from anyone tracking me.(in theory)

        Have not commented lately on this thread since most of the posts by the members seem to be well-informed and I had nothing to add.

        Personal safety is an issue here only if you become public in your complaints. For an American, probably deportation is the worst that would happen if the crime was only a bit of rabble rousing on a website. Of course, using a proxy to access Fbook and Twitter and YouTube or any site is a violation of Chinese law but it is quite common among the expat crowd and not enforced vigorously.

        Someone I work with is from one of the Arab nations that recently had a change in leadership. This person came under a great deal of scrutiny and was told to avoid politics in the classroom and not to get involved in public demonstrations, etc....I am being deliberately vague in order to protect their identity. I guess the point is they do watch us but not too closely.
        I smell Troll...too bad the ignore list can't get rid of that

        Comment


        • Originally posted by ChinaDan View Post
          Hi there. I am back using a proxy to access the site. I had a little trouble with my previous version, so I had to find a new one that would work. It allows me to hide my IP address from anyone tracking me.(in theory)

          Have not commented lately on this thread since most of the posts by the members seem to be well-informed and I had nothing to add.

          Personal safety is an issue here only if you become public in your complaints. For an American, probably deportation is the worst that would happen if the crime was only a bit of rabble rousing on a website. Of course, using a proxy to access Fbook and Twitter and YouTube or any site is a violation of Chinese law but it is quite common among the expat crowd and not enforced vigorously.

          Someone I work with is from one of the Arab nations that recently had a change in leadership. This person came under a great deal of scrutiny and was told to avoid politics in the classroom and not to get involved in public demonstrations, etc....I am being deliberately vague in order to protect their identity. I guess the point is they do watch us but not too closely.
          Interesting!

          When I first started teaching here in Laos, I soon heard that each of my classes had a 'spy' who would report on any subversive stuff I might do.

          I later found out it was true and managed to engage some of the spies in revealing conversation.

          It's totally not the case now.

          Do you see any changes over there?


          Philip
          Last edited by PhilipLaos; 09 Jun 11, 23:38.
          "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."— Bertrand Russell

          Comment


          • I have not seen a spy in my classes yet. In the middle school, it is unlikely, although there are student monitors that can help you control the class. They do report on what happened during class but I don't think they are there for political control.

            In the high school, you do run into more fervent nationalists who will sometimes bring up politics. Usually in a whiny, "why does Obama hate China" kind of way. I have not seen anything like what you described. I would guess China is more used to having foreigners teach and maybe are a little more casual about it. We are told to avoid politics and certain other areas. I notice a clause in my contract about it also.

            I would love to know more about teaching in Laos.
            I smell Troll...too bad the ignore list can't get rid of that

            Comment


            • Spies in classrooms?
              Huh, I would have thought that microphones would be cheaper, even in Laos.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by philiplaos View Post
                I figured something was up about 20 years ago sitting in the lobby of a mid-range hotel in Laos when three Chinese businessmen entered, looked at the rooms they had reserved, decided they weren't good enough and instead checked into the high-end hotel on the river.

                Until that time, I had thought of the Chinese as desperately poor rural peasants.

                Discussing that with one of the hotel staff, he commented,

                "In the future, we will all be slaves of the Chinese!"

                I think he meant me, too....


                Philip
                It's a too-common misconception that the Chinese are still rustic farmers. A large portion of their population is rural, but they have a fairly wealthy urban population.
                Last edited by Ricthofen; 11 Jun 11, 23:54.

                Comment


                • Originally posted by ChinaDan View Post
                  I would love to know more about teaching in Laos.
                  Really?

                  Just ask. I have a discussion forum about such things, where your questions about teaching in Laos might be more appropriate:

                  http://s4.zetaboards.com/Living_in_Laos/forum/3614904/


                  Philip
                  "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."— Bertrand Russell

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by philiplaos View Post
                    Really?

                    Just ask. I have a discussion forum about such things, where your questions about teaching in Laos might be more appropriate:

                    http://s4.zetaboards.com/Living_in_Laos/forum/3614904/


                    Philip
                    He just joined. Cut him some slack.
                    "The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made."
                    — Groucho Marx

                    Comment


                    • no harm done...we are all friendly here, except for those who are not...
                      I smell Troll...too bad the ignore list can't get rid of that

                      Comment


                      • Yep. And everybody makes sense... except for those who don't.
                        "We have no white flag."

                        Comment


                        • Der Spiegel interview with Kissinger

                          Below is a link to a Der Spiegel interview with Henry Kissinger, which I found very interesting. Kissinger makes some interesting comments.


                          http://www.spiegel.de/international/...772292,00.html

                          Comment


                          • Der Spiegel article link below, then excerpt: "The Resource Race: China Dips Toes in Arctic."

                            http://www.spiegel.de/international/...-a-879654.html

                            he equation seems simple. China is hungry for natural resources, and the Arctic is rich in natural resources. What could be more straightforward? But Beijing insists that its interest in the region is first and foremost for research purposes, that the Arctic can help shed light on climate change, that it offers useful shipping routes, and so on and so forth. Indeed, for now, the Chinese government has no official Arctic strategy. And it doesn't say much at all about natural resources in the region, especially because the economic superpower can -- for the time being, at least -- get what it needs elsewhere, such as in Africa.
                            But this is also because it has realized that it needs to be subtle about its interest in the polar North and not upset Arctic nations any more than it already has. "Currently, China has not carried out any exploration activities in the Arctic," said Zhao Yun, Beijing's ambassador to Norway, on Monday at the Arctic Frontiers Conference in Tromsø. China is more interested in joining forces with other states to study "trans-regional issues," he stressed.
                            Demonstrating great diplomatic finesse, Zhao insisted that Beijing was keen to communicate and cooperate with all relevant parties, including, of course, the indigenous population. It would also welcome a chance to be granted observer status on the Arctic Council. So far, so friendly.

                            Photo of a Chinese Icebreaker that has been making regular visits to the Arctic.

                            Comment


                            • Who else are claiming their arctic stake?
                              "We have no white flag."

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
                                Who else are claiming their arctic stake?
                                The big countries already there - US, Russia, Canada and the Scandinavian countries and Greenland. All are there, China is not. The end of the article is interesting - some thought they are "practicing" so they can exploit the Antarctic in the coming decades:

                                excerpt from article:

                                "China's arctic research is still at the starting stage," Zhao said. In 2004, China -- like many other countries, including Germany -- set up a research station on the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen. Meanwhile, the Polar Research Institute in Shanghai trains scientists specialized in the region, while another 120-meter-long icebreaker is currently being built with Finnish help. The Xue Long has now made five trips to the Arctic. The last was in the summer of 2012, when it traveled from Iceland via the North Pole to the Bering Strait. As it entered the waters off Spitsbergen, the Norwegian coast guard was there in an instant -- in stark contrast to Canada's casual response back in 1999.
                                "China spends much more on research in the Antarctic than the Arctic," cautions Lunde, from the Fridtjof Nansen Institute. For now, using Antarctica's natural resources is prohibited by the Antarctic Treaty System. But that ban might be lifted in the decades to come. "Maybe they are just preparing themselves," says Lunde. "China is very good at long-term thinking."

                                Comment

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