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  • Recently, many of my students have stated that they believe China has been so successful economically because they make things better than everyone else. There are stores named Made In China now to capitalize on these assumptions. Chinese students and people can be invincible in their ignorance on things, so there is no room for debate about the quality of their products. This is a new development in their thinking.
    We also have that here, with slogans "Proudly Philippine Made", as part of the Buy Filipino thrust of the government.

    FYI: the average Chinese person believes the goverment has their best interests at heart, no matter how much evidence to the contrary that is presented to them. For example, in the city where I live, the local govt. has been instructed to reduce power usage. Their solution is a simple one, cut off the power periodically. The fact they chose to do this during the winter and at the schools is what I found objectionable. My students when questioned about it all gave the same answer about the govt. doing what is best for them. My question about doing it when the weather was better was met with blank stares.
    Which just goes to show, you can teach people new things, but you can't teach them what to do with it.

    There are only 4 channels on Chinese TV. One is CCTV, a news channel of sorts, one shows Beijing opera and classical music occasionally, another is for historical dramas about the old empire and finally, one is all military dramas showing the awful occupation by the Japanese. The Chinese military prevails single-handedly in all of these.
    Well, there's always the satellite dish...
    "We have no white flag."

    Comment


    • On the language issue. It’s more of the practice of restricting the Tibetan language, therefore leaving only the national Chinese language being taught in schools.
      


      25 May, 2011
      Tibetan Language: UN Human Rights Experts’ Urgent Intervention with China
      According to documents made available before the 17th session of the UN Human Rights Council, four human rights experts of the Council, on 22 October, 2010 issued a joint urgent appeal to China “regarding allegations relating to restrictions imposed on the use of the Tibetan language in schools in the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of China.” The experts were the Special Rapporteur on the right to education, the
 Independent Expert in the field of cultural rights, Special Rapporteur on Contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and Independent Expert on minority issues. 



      http://www.savetibet.org/media-cente...80%A8%E2%80%A8
      On the issue of satellite. SINOSAT is operated by the Yungang Earth Station of the Aerospace Science and Technology Group Company. They are responsible for the transmission of the SINOSAT signals for the Chinese government. They are capable of jamming illegal transmissions or frequencies.

      Illegal TV signals are also recorded by the TV monitoring center of the State Administration of Radio, Film and TV.

      Sorry, but I do not have a "link" for this.
      I got this directly from a good friend who works for Aerospace Science and Technology Group Co.
      He has told me some stuff that shocked even me, and I am already a China skeptic.
      Last edited by Persephone; 05 Jun 11, 18:47.
      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Persephone View Post
        On the language issue. It’s more of the practice of restricting the Tibetan language, therefore leaving only the national Chinese language being taught in schools.
        

On the issue of satellite. SINOSAT is operated by the Yungang Earth Station of the Aerospace Science and Technology Group Company. They are responsible for the transmission of the SINOSAT signals for the Chinese government. They are capable of jamming illegal transmissions or frequencies.

        Illegal TV signals are also recorded by the TV monitoring center of the State Administration of Radio, Film and TV.

        Sorry, but I do not have a "link" for this.
        I got this directly from a good friend who works for Aerospace Science and Technology Group Co.
        He has told me some stuff that shocked even me, and I am already a China skeptic.
        “regarding allegations relating to restrictions imposed on the use of the Tibetan language in schools in the Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture of China.”
        And what exactly are these allegations? How are they being restricted? That's what I'd like to know. And, is this applicable to Tibetans only? China has hundreds of minorities, and as far as I know, state-funded education is mandarin (as well it should be, considering it's the national language). And, how different is this over here in the Philippines, where schools are mandated to teach in Pilipino (no schools teach the local dialects)? Nobody makes a big fuss about it.

        My (personal) question to you then is, is it wrong for the state to mandate the teaching of the national language (mandarin or pilipino)? Personally, I think it's the prerogative of the State to do so, and since it's the state's coffers that's paying for it, so long as the establishment of other schools teaching other languages aren't disallowed, I see nothing wrong with it.

        Sorry, but I do not have a "link" for this.
        I got this directly from a good friend who works for Aerospace Science and Technology Group Co.
        He has told me some stuff that shocked even me, and I am already a China skeptic.
        I don't mind you not having links for all statements. It's perfectly understandable that not all that is claimed is provable by citing a source, and not all source necessarily can prove a truth (in short, not everything written is correct, either). In general I just need to know the basis, whether based on a report or an opinion piece (a world of difference, right?), of personal or other people's experience (direct as opposed to hearsay, again a world of difference), etc. Add in the factor of anonymity of these forums, which can be mitigated or exacerbated by long acquaintance of the people here. These of course should help form in our minds how large (or small) a grain of salt we take with people's posts.

        Sometimes I notice when the word "Tibet" and "oppression" is mentioned, it's like all logic flies out the window, and people simply accept the claim (new or old) as TRUTH. I honestly find it a bit weird.

        And I find that when I questioned that guy about his BASIS (note, not just "source"), it's like he was on his high horse feeling so offended that someone would be asking for a basis and not simply take what he said as TRUTH. (the nerve of that GMan88 hahaha).

        I'd like to know what some of those "stuff" are. If it shocked you, it'll most likely shock me, too
        Last edited by GMan88; 05 Jun 11, 19:36.
        "We have no white flag."

        Comment


        • It has been said a language is a dialect with an army and a navy. I believe that is the case with the Chinese Language. There is one standard written language, but many different spoken languages, which the Chinese classify as dialects. Per the linked Wikipedia article 300 to 400 million people speak another language as their primary language.




          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_spoken_language

          Comment


          • Putonghua: the common tongue

            Generally speaking, you can hear different dialects just by walking around a city. Everybody will speak a little putonghua or Mandarin but most will rely on the local dialect. In my city, it is Jingmenhua, travel an hour by train and hear xiangfanhua. My friends and I have also found different dialects being spoken in neighborhoods, usually by older people.

            The level of Mandarin being spoken often depends on the level of education of the person. Chinese is hard for Chinese people also. Many teachers of Chinese will tell you the average person here does not speak good Chinese.

            My own Chinese is terrible and I read it worse than I speak it and write it not at all. However, I can get around the city with my putonghua usually but not on Sundays. The taxi drivers on Sundays are substitute drivers and speak only local dialects or are unable to understand my Mandarin.

            It is not uncommon for people to simply be unable to understand Chinese when a white face speaks it. In our group, we have a woman who speaks Chinese fluently but even so she is sometimes unable to communicate. It is as if the brain shuts down when they see a foreigner.

            In Hong Kong, I do better with English since most people there speak Cantonese which is even harder than Mandarin to learn. It is also written differently.

            The real benefit for the Chinese with Mandarin is most Chinese people can read it.
            I smell Troll...too bad the ignore list can't get rid of that

            Comment


            • Dan, just wondering. Do they still show movies of the early 20th century period with "No Chinese or Dogs allowed" signs? Several years ago there was some interesting comment on the Peking Duck (I believe) that showed some Chinese posters who absolutely believed that such a policy existed in Shanghai's European concessions. One poster tracked it down to a made in Hong Kong movie.
              dit: Lirelou

              Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì!

              Comment


              • Hi, I have not personally seen this but I would not be surprised since it helps to manipulate the populace. I have seen No Japanese or Dogs Allowed written above a bar entrance. Or rather, someone who reads Chinese much better than me translated it. The students are taught from an early age to hate the Japanese. They like to call it "Little Japan".
                Last edited by ChinaDan; 06 Jun 11, 03:50.
                I smell Troll...too bad the ignore list can't get rid of that

                Comment


                • Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
                  It has been said a language is a dialect with an army and a navy. I believe that is the case with the Chinese Language. There is one standard written language, but many different spoken languages, which the Chinese classify as dialects. Per the linked Wikipedia article 300 to 400 million people speak another language as their primary language.




                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_spoken_language
                  Yep.
                  "We have no white flag."

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
                    Yep.
                    Then I should see 100% support from members here should the United States abolish such things as driving tests and voting ballots in ALL ENGLISH.
                    Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                    Prayers.

                    BoRG

                    http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                      Then I should see 100% support from members here should the United States abolish such things as driving tests and voting ballots in ALL ENGLISH.
                      Sigh. That's precisely my point, which some people keep refusing to see...

                      It seems if it's somewhere else and english, nobody is "forced" to learn it, but if it's china and it's mandarin, heaven forbid, it's "pity the poor ethnic groups" time.
                      Last edited by GMan88; 06 Jun 11, 05:46.
                      "We have no white flag."

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
                        Sigh. That's precisely my point, which some people keep refusing to see...

                        It seems if it's somewhere else and english, nobody is "forced" to learn it, but if it's china and it's mandarin, heaven forbid, it's "pity the poor ethnic groups" time.
                        No, you missed the point. Here we are forced to have English when we push #2...........and people bitch about us being overbearing, but bend over backwards to defend China while they themselves live in the luxury of not having to deal with a totalitarian government.


                        BTW, yesterday was the anniversary of Tiananmen Square Massacre of 1989. Don't hear much about it because the Red Government knuckled down, and it seems like ObamaWorld here kept quiet. Kind of sucks, but seems to point out that your vision of that China does not control the internet and media world in their own country really needs you to have another look.
                        Last edited by Salinator; 06 Jun 11, 06:42.
                        Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                        Prayers.

                        BoRG

                        http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                        https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                        Comment


                        • Did I? It's still "forced", isn't it? If not, why bother "forcing" people to learn it, regardless of when it is?

                          Is it the anniversary? Fancy not hearing too much about it in the media... hmm...
                          "We have no white flag."

                          Comment


                          • Originally posted by lakechampainer View Post
                            It has been said a language is a dialect with an army and a navy. I believe that is the case with the Chinese Language. There is one standard written language, but many different spoken languages, which the Chinese classify as dialects. Per the linked Wikipedia article 300 to 400 million people speak another language as their primary language.

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_spoken_language
                            Calling it dialects is the proper term. Chinese comprise of many dialects.

                            When I decided to learn Chinese, I was told to select a dialect.

                            I first chose Mandarin, then Cantonese and then Toisanese.
                            It took a while, but I managed to master the tonage for all three. Mastering the tones for each dialect is key to speaking them properly.
                            "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                            "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

                            Comment


                            • Wow, that's a very difficult language to master, and you mastered 3???

                              BTW, what's Toisanese?
                              "We have no white flag."

                              Comment


                              • Toisanese is a dialect from China's Toisan district in the Pearl River Delta. Early Chinese immigrants to the United States in the 70's were mostly from this district.
                                You could speak Toisanese to almost any Chinese-American from New York to California and be understood.

                                The dialect is used very little here in the United States now. No one speaks it anymore, except the elders.
                                Last edited by Persephone; 06 Jun 11, 18:32.
                                "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                                "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

                                Comment

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