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  • Thailand's Red Shirt Protestors.

    As most of you may know Bangkok has been under attack by numerous protestors who are usually called Red Shirt Protestors. Here is a fox news article on the situation.

    BANGKOK (AP) — Thai troops faced off against die-hard protesters vowing to defend their fortified encampment in downtown Bangkok on Saturday, following two days of running gunbattles that killed 16 people and wounded nearly 160.

    ...
    Article trimmed to conform to ACG copyright policy. Please see the FAQ for more info. Thank You, ACG Staff.
    ___

    Associated Press writers Thanyarat Doksone, Vijay Joshi, Chris Blake, Grant Peck and Jocelyn Gecker contributed to this report. Additional research by Warangkana Tempati.
    What are your thoughts on these riots in Thailand? This article isn't entirely up to date, Leaders of the Protestors have either surrendered or have been killed. But riots still surge throughout the city,doubt they will last long though.
    Last edited by GCoyote; 21 May 10, 22:27.
    Studying Logistics since birth....

  • #2
    I have been watching this all week on the BBC, but they have not been very clear about what the issues are. Obviously we know what the Red Shirts say the issues are, but no western account I have seen has investigated any of these accusations. It is very difficult to decide whom I think is right when all I have are the biased statements from both sides.

    Just because someone protests something doesn't mean they are automatically on the right side of an issue. Even if they are resisted forcefully. Especially since these guys are trying to disrupt the economy of Thailand, and that will hurt a lot of people who don't deserve to be hurt.

    I need more information.

    One thing I am certain of though, my inclination is not to side with the Red Shirts. If they want my support they better change their colors. Otherwise that color is suggestive to me of their political beliefs. Beliefs which I cannot feel sympathy toward.

    Comment


    • #3
      When the king finally dies it'll be burn baby burn! That old king became king because someone shot his first inline for the throne brother. His son, the first inline for the throne Prince, is so unpopular the process might need to be repeated.
      Big money and power are positioning for the post king bunfight. The red shirts thing is just a symptom.
      Thaksin is plotting and scheming from his Cambodian safe haven. All pretty wacky.

      Comment


      • #4
        If I'm not mistaken, it's suspected that the Red Shirts wanted to put back Thaksin into place, who himself was removed from power. I think they were saying that they were protecting democracy etc.

        As far as I have read, the new prime minister (a Harvard grad, if I recall correctly), already gave in to the protesters' main demand of holding an election this year instead of next year as originally planned. A november election was set, but then the red shirts made new demands, to which the new PM then no longer wanted to entertain... and so, after weeks of holding central bangkok hostage, the PM sent the army in to clear the area... Who's right and who's wrong? I guess it'd already depend which side you're on. Was there excessive force? Again, it would depend which perspective you're looking at. I think at the start the army was using rubber bullets (which, as we know, can still be lethal if "properly" used), I'm not entirely clear what caused the escalation to live rounds.
        "We have no white flag."

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
          If I'm not mistaken, it's suspected that the Red Shirts wanted to put back Thaksin into place, who himself was removed from power. I think they were saying that they were protecting democracy etc.

          As far as I have read, the new prime minister (a Harvard grad, if I recall correctly), already gave in to the protesters' main demand of holding an election this year instead of next year as originally planned. A november election was set, but then the red shirts made new demands, to which the new PM then no longer wanted to entertain... and so, after weeks of holding central bangkok hostage, the PM sent the army in to clear the area... Who's right and who's wrong? I guess it'd already depend which side you're on. Was there excessive force? Again, it would depend which perspective you're looking at. I think at the start the army was using rubber bullets (which, as we know, can still be lethal if "properly" used), I'm not entirely clear what caused the escalation to live rounds.
          Both sides have taken things too far in my perspective. What caused the military to use live ammunition was the fact that protestors were throwing homemade grenades at the soldiers.

          New update on the situation,The military has raided the main area the protestors were holding up in. Many have scattered and I believe the military has control of the barricaded area, but still protestors are burning buildings around town. Also remember that the military isn't that effective at the moment thanks to a couple of complications: A, The military is working in a area with civilians so they are limited in their options and B, There are many soldiers in the military that support the red shirts. They are often referred to as "watermelons". My outllok on the situation is that the situation is coming closer to an end but there is still going to be many people who will have a great hate towards their goverment until their current prime minister is thrown out.
          Studying Logistics since birth....

          Comment


          • #6
            What's wrong with the new PM? I recall reading that he got very little credit for steering Thailand from a potential financial crisis a short while ago.

            And is it true that the PM he replaced was removed when people (Yellow Shirts?) were disgusted after finding out that the former PM sold his company to a buyer, then had an order done that exempted the billion dollar transaction from payment of taxes?
            "We have no white flag."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
              What's wrong with the new PM? I recall reading that he got very little credit for steering Thailand from a potential financial crisis a short while ago.

              And is it true that the PM he replaced was removed when people (Yellow Shirts?) were disgusted after finding out that the former PM sold his company to a buyer, then had an order done that exempted the billion dollar transaction from payment of taxes?
              I read somewhere that he got to his position thanks to his friends in high places (i.e. Military and political officals).
              Studying Logistics since birth....

              Comment


              • #8
                Ah, that's normal politics...
                "We have no white flag."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
                  What's wrong with the new PM? I recall reading that he got very little credit for steering Thailand from a potential financial crisis a short while ago.

                  And is it true that the PM he replaced was removed when people (Yellow Shirts?) were disgusted after finding out that the former PM sold his company to a buyer, then had an order done that exempted the billion dollar transaction from payment of taxes?
                  Hello GMan,

                  yes - more or less you got it right there. The real "joke" on this whole protest is that Thaksin - even at present - has no intentions of returning to Thailand.
                  Sadly for Thailand it has become an everlasting standard situation - that once their economy picks up and every thing starts to run well - BOOM - the next coup d'état, comes up.

                  Regards
                  Kruska

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hello Kruska.

                    That's really too bad about thailand. It's a beautiful country, and I think the current PM isn't so bad (as politicians go). Hope things settle down over there.

                    GMan
                    "We have no white flag."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Another update: The Military has taken back the the downtown district of bangkok. Still most area's of the country are under a strict night time curfew, just a couple of days ago a couple of teens were arrested for shooting off fireworks after curfew as if they were trying to taunt police. I don't know of their current fate as of right now but I'll see what I can find.

                      Also,sorry but I can not find the original link to the fox story I posted that had to be revised due to a rule I did not know about (sorry).
                      Studying Logistics since birth....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Here's a couple of quotes from a friend of a friend who haqs lived in Bangkok for 17 years and heads up the NZ-Thai Chamber of Commerce.

                        Dear All,

                        The foreign media seems to have the wrong slant in the situation here in Thailand, and in particular, Bangkok. This is particularly so with BBC World TV.

                        I’ve lived in Thailand for over 17 years and I believe the two attached articles (not included for copyright purposes - but supportive of a crackdown.) very correctly describe the real situation.

                        I have always read Voranai Vanijaka’s column in today’s (16 May 10) edition of the Bangkok Post. He generally comes across as unbiased and, in the attached article, he has, in my opinion, ‘hit the nail on the head’.

                        The article from today’s edition of Spectrum, a supplement with the Bangkok Post, there is sufficient evidence that the rally is very well organised and well funded. This is certainly not a spontaneous uprising of Thailand’s poor although many are being used in this red shirts demonstration. Neither article reveals that attendees receive a daily per diem and this is an attraction for many poor Thais, including those who attend each evening from Klong Toey slum.

                        I live right in the centre of the area cordoned off at 6 pm last Thursday evening. A black ‘X’ next to the ‘L’ in the words Land Suan Road shows where I live. Until the area was sealed last Thursday evening, I could travel out and return by taxi. One thing which always amazed me was the huge number of private vehicles which would appear in the evening double- and triple-parked along the streets inside the red shirts’ blockades.

                        Thais we know who worked in the area (prior to its being sealed) have spoken with red shirts and their guards. They have remarked on the fact that some red shirts guards cannot understand the Thai language. They are obviously Cambodians or Burmese who could well be illegal immigrants.

                        A lot of money is being spent on financing this demonstration – the daily per diem for the attendees, the power generators in use, the air-conditioned shipping containers housing the broadcast studio, the meeting room and the sleeping quarters of the red shirts’ leaders, the sound system, the free food and medical supplies provided, etc. Where are the funds coming from?

                        With his frequent video and telephone calls broadcast live to the demonstrators and supporters up-country, ex Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra encouraged, to the point of inciting, the demonstrators. Much, but not all, of the funding would have come from him. It has been alleged that some large companies have been donating funding.

                        The red shirt leaders’ propaganda is directed at the elite and the ‘aristocracy’ cleverly falling short of including the Royal Family because of the devotion the rural and poor Thais have for HM The King. The red shirt leaders and those financially backing the demonstration cannot afford to lose the grass roots support for the demonstration.

                        For decades, enterprising Chinese immigrants have amassed fortunes in Thailand – setting up rice and sugar mills and quarries in Thailand’s provinces plus factories and other industries throughout the country. Many have, quite frankly, exploited the rural poor of Thailand who couldn’t afford to send their children to school. Those are the elite the poor Thais should be directing their vengeance against. They have provided the cheap labour which enabled some Chinese immigrants to create their fortunes. However, the force behind the current demonstration has cleverly re-directed the vengeance of the poor Thais against a selective ‘elite’ and ‘aristocracy’.

                        There is little doubt that, as Voranai Vanijaka has said in his column this morning, Thaksin wants his power back as well as his confiscated fortune through the tax-free sale of Shin shares to Singapore’s Temasak Holdings.

                        During my 26 years in the military operating against communists and exposed to their propaganda, the current propaganda disseminated by the red shirt leadership is very similar. In the attached Spectrum article there is mention of the manufacture of Che Guevara caps. This style cap was a copy of the cap worn by Mao Tse Tung and his followers, the red guards, the militant wings of the Communist Party of Malaysia and Thailand and the Khmer Rouges in Cambodia. To me at 75 years of age, there is a feeling of déjà vu in the way this current demonstration in Thailand has been funded, organised and controlled.

                        I would just like the foreign media to understand the real situation in Thailand and what has led to this current unrest.

                        At present, I can send but NOT receive e-mail correspondence.

                        Kind regards, Barry Petersen
                        dit: Lirelou

                        Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá gì!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by lirelou View Post
                          Here's a couple of quotes from a friend of a friend who haqs lived in Bangkok for 17 years and heads up the NZ-Thai Chamber of Commerce.
                          Hello Lirelou,

                          I agree to most of the quotes -thanks for sharing - but not to the following:

                          For decades, enterprising Chinese immigrants have amassed fortunes in Thailand – setting up rice and sugar mills and quarries in Thailand’s provinces plus factories and other industries throughout the country. Many have, quite frankly, exploited the rural poor of Thailand who couldn’t afford to send their children to school. Those are the elite the poor Thais should be directing their vengeance against. They have provided the cheap labour which enabled some Chinese immigrants to create their fortunes.
                          The above is a very tipical sidewacking method in S.E.Asia in order to disguise and evade the corruption and inability of the own indignious population towards economic issues.

                          Regards
                          Kruska

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Thank lirelou for adding a different perspective to the situation in bangkok,most of this information I have never heard of but thats probably because the western media hasn't picked up on it(yet?). Also I some what agree with kruska but that also can be semi-true as well.
                            Studying Logistics since birth....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I have been watching the BBC on this, and I don't think they have misrepresented anything. Why? Because they really haven't told us anything other than that there is fighting. I have watched the BBC extensively since the election and they really haven't done any analysis of the Thai situation at all. I could not glean any background whatsoever from the BBC about what was happening other than the basics. I don't think the BBC has been biased on this, I think they have been incomplete. As if they couldn't make up their mind themselves about what to report.

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