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  • Asia's Suez Canal

    Beijing is serious about building a 1,200 km long canal across southern Thailand that would allow cargo ships to bypass the Suez Canal. Vessels sailing from Asia to the East Coast are charged approx $500,000 for passage through the Suez Canal. Last year, over 17,000 vessels passed thru the Suez.







    China’s ‘Suez Canal’: Beijing Wants to Build ‘Golden Waterway’ in Asia
    in International Shipping News 01/06/2016
    Chinese experts refer to the project, which drew its inspiration from the Panama Canal and Suez Canal, as a “golden waterway” or “golden seaway.”
    The idea goes back centuries
    The initiative originated in 1677 when Thai King Narai asked the French to build a canal in the narrowest part of the Malay Peninsula, known as Kra Isthmus. But the technology available at the time was simply not good enough to make it happen.
    The idea surfaced many times over the centuries, but it really took off last year when the China-Thailand Kra Infrastructure Investment and Development and Asia Union Group signed a memorandum of understanding. Both Chinese and Thai governments later said that they were not involved in the project.
    If built, the new waterway would allow the ships to bypass the narrow Strait of Malacca, cutting their travelling time to China by 72 hours. The project would help to cut costs on oil shipments from the Middle East and Africa and would also bring extra business to the Chinese ports in Shanghai, Hong Kong and Shenzhen.
    In addition, the canal would also provide a necessary boost to Thailand’s economy through foreign investment, infrastructure development, toll fees, ship servicing, etc. http://www.hellenicshippingnews.com/...erway-in-asia/
    Last edited by Persephone; 03 Jun 16, 16:46.
    "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

  • #2
    Originally posted by Persephone View Post
    Beijing is serious about building a 1,200 km long canal across southern Thailand that would allow cargo ships to bypass the Suez Canal. Vessels sailing from Asia to the East Coast are charged approx $500,000 for passage through the Suez Canal. Last year, over 17,000 vessels passed thru the Suez.



    How would this canal let ships bypass the Suez Canal? It would only save them time by not having to sail south through the Strait of Malacca.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by johns624 View Post
      How would this canal let ships bypass the Suez Canal? It would only save them time by not having to sail south through the Strait of Malacca.

      With the time saved by cutting across southern Thailand, vessels can afford to go the long way, around Africa. By using the South Africa route, it could save on average $200,000 per voyage.
      "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

      "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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      • #4
        There also has been discussions about routing Asia trade with Europe through the Arctic to avoid the Suez & Malacca.



        Arctic next 'golden waterway' for China-Europe trade
        DALIAN -- Shipping experts are considering routine navigation through Arctic waters to link China and Europe, a shortcut to bypass the route that passes through the Malacca Strait and Suez Canal.
        http://en.people.cn/n/2015/1027/c90000-8967158.html
        "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

        "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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        • #5
          So the Egyptians only need to cut the cost of Suez passage a bit and keep the route as ships will save even more time using both canals - especially since the SC has been doubled so transit time will be faster - indeed the Egyptians could afford to do this because of increased traffic. One assumes also that the philanthropic Chinese won't be offering free passage.
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Persephone View Post
            With the time saved by cutting across southern Thailand, vessels can afford to go the long way, around Africa. By using the South Africa route, it could save on average $200,000 per voyage.
            Yeah, half a million per Suez transit is just ridiculous. And Malacca is rotten with pigmy-Pirates that Malaysia and Indonesia never seem willing to eliminate in a coordinated way... which is the ONLY way to get rid of them.

            Maybe China has finally found something worthwhile to blow their money on.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
              Yeah, half a million per Suez transit is just ridiculous. And Malacca is rotten with pigmy-Pirates that Malaysia and Indonesia never seem willing to eliminate in a coordinated way... which is the ONLY way to get rid of them.
              Not sure if that is true, the RN had a damn good coordinated try in the 19th century but they are still there.
              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                So the Egyptians only need to cut the cost of Suez passage a bit and keep the route as ships will save even more time using both canals - especially since the SC has been doubled so transit time will be faster - indeed the Egyptians could afford to do this because of increased traffic. One assumes also that the philanthropic Chinese won't be offering free passage.

                Since the Suez expansion last year, traffic have not increased. The Suez wasn't even hitting capacity before the expansion. Lowering the cost would probably help increase traffic but I doubt they will do so. They will be paying off the cost of the expansion for years.

                The Chinese won't allow free passage but they will most likely be a much cheaper alternative.
                "Stand for the flag ~ Kneel for the fallen"

                "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer." ~ Bruce Lee

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                • #9
                  Singapore is going to be pissed off big time! If this gets built they will lose their key geographical advantage along with all the benefits (economic, political and military) that come with it. Their status as one of the worlds leading international trade hubs would disappear the day the locks open to admit the first transiting cargo vessel. Malaysia would love to see that happen.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
                    And Malacca is rotten with pigmy-Pirates that Malaysia and Indonesia never seem willing to eliminate in a coordinated way... which is the ONLY way to get rid of them.
                    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                    Not sure if that is true, the RN had a damn good coordinated try in the 19th century but they are still there.

                    By Adam McCauley
                    [.....]
                    When the world thinks of piracy, it thinks of Somalia and red-eyed young brigands peering over the barrels of their Kalashnikovs. It thinks of the 2013 Hollywood movie Captain Phillips, which tells the story of the hijacking of the Maersk Alabama in 2009 and the capture of its American captain. But the waters of the West Indian Ocean are not the world’s most dangerous. Far from it. The most perilous seas, as the U.N. declared last month, are those of Southeast Asia — and for criminals they offer sumptuously rich pickings.

                    Stretching from the westernmost corner of Malaysia to the tip of Indonesia’s Bintan Island, the Malacca and Singapore straits serve as global shipping superhighways. Each year, more than 120,000 ships traverse these waterways, accounting for a third of the world’s marine commerce. Between 70% and 80% of all the oil imported by China and Japan transits the straits.

                    (see map in the article - link below)

                    Southeast Asia was the location of 41% of the world’s pirate attacks between 1995 and 2013. The West Indian Ocean, which includes Somalia, accounted for just 28%, and the West African coast only 18%. During those years, 136 seafarers were killed in Southeast Asian waters as a result of piracy — that’s twice the number in the Horn of Africa, where Somalia lies, and more than those deaths and the fatalities suffered in West Africa combined.

                    According to a 2010 study by the One Earth Future Foundation, piracy drains between $7 billion and $12 billion dollars from the international economy each year. The Asian share of that represents buccaneering on a lavish scale, and it is becoming more ambitious. In recent months, well-armed and organized criminal groups have focused their efforts on the oil tankers that exit the narrow Malacca and Singapore straits and venture into the South China Sea. Here, the territory is vast, law enforcement’s resources are stretched, and the potential profits are immense.
                    [.....]
                    http://time.com/piracy-southeast-asia-malacca-strait/
                    Last edited by At ease; 08 Jun 16, 09:18.
                    "It's like shooting rats in a barrel."
                    "You'll be in a barrel if you don't watch out for the fighters!"

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                    — Sergei(son of Igor) Sikorsky, 'AOPA Pilot' magazine February 2003.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Monash View Post
                      Singapore is going to be pissed off big time! If this gets built they will lose their key geographical advantage along with all the benefits (economic, political and military) that come with it. Their status as one of the worlds leading international trade hubs would disappear the day the locks open to admit the first transiting cargo vessel. Malaysia would love to see that happen.
                      I have sometimes wondered how much money Singapore actually makes out of being East Asia's principal transshipment port.

                      Singapore is the world's #1 transshipment port for 2016:

                      Rank Port Country
                      1 Singapore Singapore
                      2 Hong Kong Hong Kong, China
                      3 Shanghai China
                      4 Kaohsiung Taiwan
                      5 Busan South Korea
                      6 Tanjung Pelepas Malaysia
                      7 Rotterdam Netherlands
                      8 Dubai United Arab Emirates
                      9 Gioia Tauro Italy
                      10 Algeciras Spain
                      11 Hamburg Germany
                      12 Salalah Oman
                      13 Klang Malaysia
                      14 Colombo Sri Lanka
                      15 Port Authority of Jamaica Jamaica
                      16 Antwerp Belgium
                      17 Sines Portugal
                      18 Los Angeles United States
                      19 New Jersey United States
                      20 Port Authority of Jamaica Jamaica
                      21 LACONA Panama
                      22 Cristoba Panama
                      23 Santos Brazil
                      24 Tangier Morocco
                      25 Luanda Angola
                      26 City of Cape South Africa
                      27 Maputo Mozambique
                      List of world's busiest transshipment ports
                      在魔鬼和深蓝色的海洋之间. 悪魔と深海の間. Carpe hunc diem.

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                      • #12
                        #15 is Jamaica? What the hell do they import/export through there?

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by johns624 View Post
                          #15 is Jamaica? What the hell do they import/export through there?
                          Humans, for one thing. A favored port of Human trafficking in the Western Hemisphere.
                          Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                            Beijing is serious about building a 1,200 km long canal across southern Thailand that would allow cargo ships to bypass the Suez Canal. Vessels sailing from Asia to the East Coast are charged approx $500,000 for passage through the Suez Canal. Last year, over 17,000 vessels passed thru the Suez.



                            I think you have one zero too many.

                            Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                            With the time saved by cutting across southern Thailand, vessels can afford to go the long way, around Africa. By using the South Africa route, it could save on average $200,000 per voyage.
                            The time going around Africa is much longer than the time going around Malaysia.

                            Originally posted by Persephone View Post
                            There also has been discussions about routing Asia trade with Europe through the Arctic to avoid the Suez & Malacca.
                            Have they considered the weather and ice, especially during the coldest months? I'm sure it would cost a lot more to hire a icebreaker then to pay the toll at the Suez Canal or a pirate's ransom. How many millions/billions would be lost if a tanker is caught and crushed by ice, not even to mention the environmental damage.
                            Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

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