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  • Books

    In order to improve the quality of this sub-forum it would IMO be a good idea to have a 'Literature on Africa' sticky, where one can posts with tips on books about Africa you would like to share

    My first suggestion hereto would be:

    John Reader's : 'Africa, A Biography of the Continent'



    which I found amazing in its scope
    Last edited by Colonel Sennef; 17 Mar 10, 05:09.
    BoRG

    You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

  • #2
    Race Against Time

    I had forgotten about this book until it appeared on Wikipedia today - thought it may have some reference here, although many do not agree with the author.

    Here is a summation at Wikipedia.
    Attached Files

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MeenMutha View Post
      I had forgotten about this book until it appeared on Wikipedia today - thought it may have some reference here, although many do not agree with the author.
      What is your opinion of what Lewis has to say, MM?

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, first off, his criticism of our previous presidents less than useless attempts at managing the AIDS crisis only served to support what many of us here already knew but nobody wanted to listen to (locally). Many of his reasons why africa is in its current state I agree with, but not his policies to alleviate. I am not a fan of donating monies. You all know the saying give a beggar a loaf of bread today, versus teaching him to make his own bread, so I do not want charities - it also breeds an irresponsible attitude. I would say let African countries have access to (responsible) loans and let us compete on an international footing through dropping of trade barriers etc. Locating of industry is another option which is happening. Supporting those countries that have a proven track record with regard to good capitalistic practices. Engaging those countries so as to provide intellectual resources - engage, not arrogantly dictate.

        My opinion in brief.

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        • #5
          On a much lighter note, I would like to point out this book:



          'The Shadow of the Sun' by the world renowned Polish journalist Ryszard Kapuscinksi. He brings Africa to life with all its smells and colours. For instance, his description of what happens to you when you have you got malaria is unforgettable, both for its exactitude as for its prose.

          Not as factual as for instance Kaplan's books are, let alone John Reader's book 'Africa, Biography of a Continent' which I recommended earlier, this one through its elegantly written narratives seems to allow for a deeper understanding of the many deeper currents in Africa.
          BoRG

          You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

          Comment


          • #6
            Please let me suggest this one.

            It's the only book I possess on African history and it immediately was a shot in the bull's eye. Informative, easy to read and alot of maps as support



            http://www.amazon.com/Scramble-Afric.../dp/0380719991



            Greets,
            Stratego
            Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.- Napoleon

            It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.- Herman Melville

            Aut viam inveniam aut faciam

            BORG

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Stratego View Post
              Please let me suggest this one.

              It's the only book I possess on African history and it immediately was a shot in the bull's eye. Informative, easy to read and alot of maps as support

              Greets,
              Stratego

              Excellent choice, Jason....also one of the few books I have on Africa as well


              Comment


              • #8


                Great read and very insightful. I start to think that you are not taken seriously in debates on African politics and security if you haven't read this book. Doubles well both as textbook and as airport literature
                BoRG

                You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

                Comment


                • #9
                  War In Angola-The Final South African Phase by Helmoed-Romer Heitman is a worth while read.

                  Comment


                  • #10



                    Much more 'current affairs' than Meredith's book, see above.
                    Otherwise: highly realistic, anecdotal and even engaging.
                    If I had to mention a downside: it is perhaps a bit light on Francophone Africa.
                    BoRG

                    You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I recently saw the film "Disgrace" based upon the novel by the same name by the now-Australian author, J. M. Coetzee. A disturbingly bleak view of modern South Africa - from the White perspective - with the pyramid of social power and violence now inverted and the main characters learning to cope with their now-reduced social standing. Any impressions from our South African members on this film/book?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        As you all know China’s burgeoning interest in Africa is a feature of International Politics.

                        I have not read a factual book, but a thriller that features China’s interest in Africa.

                        The book is The Man from Beijing by Henning Mankell.

                        It starts with a horrific mass murder in Sweden and ranges to the US, to China, Africa and London. There are some other murders in Africa and a shooting in London.

                        It features a Swedish policewoman and a Swedish judge, a new Chinese business man, an old Chinese traditionalist (who is the business man’s sister) as the main characters, and as minor characters the range is from Russian cleaning ladies and Vietnamese criminals to a couple of African Presidents.

                        It kept me going! But it was not totally absorbing. It is not a stay up all night read, but interesting, none-the-less for featuring globalization in a murderous manner.
                        Homo homini lupus

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not sure how I missed this thread until now.

                          The State of Africa is an exceptional look into modern Africa.

                          Shake Hands WIth The Devil; The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda by General Romeo Dallaire was without a doubt the most troubling book I have ever read.

                          The Zanzibar Chest was quite interesting as well. A UK journalist's view of Africa from having been born and raised there. It is his personal story, but it paints vivid picture of east Africa in the telling.

                          I didn't Do It For You tells the story of the emergence of Eritrea as an independent state.
                          Be thankful we're not getting all the government we pay for
                          - WIll Rogers

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                          • #14
                            I enjoyed The Scramble for Africa.
                            Shake hands with the Devil was good but there are far better books on the Rwandan genocide.
                            "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
                            validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
                            "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              African view on airborne



                              I must confess I haven't seen this book myself yet, but it might be interesting, hence the heads-up.

                              As the African operational theatre poses unique challenges to air mobile and airborne operations
                              (amongst others: huge distances compared to Europe, scarcity of key points and infrastructure, strategic vs tactical mobility), I expect the author to express strong views;
                              basing his judgement on French, Belgian, Rhodesian and South African experiences, coming to a uniquely 'African' approach to this type of warfare.
                              BoRG

                              You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

                              Comment

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