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Scenes from Occupied Europe

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  • Scenes from Occupied Europe

    August 1940. German troops and French workers rebuild destroyed French railway bridges and installations.



  • #2
    August 1940. German relief agencies distribute food to the French civilians after the French surrender.


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    • #3
      August 1940. German occupation of the Channel Islands.

      Translation:
      German troops have stepped onto British soil for the first time with the occupation of the Channel Islands of Guernsey and Jersey. The British occupiers have either fled or been taken prisoner. While the life of the local population is set in order under the protection of German weapons, German troops stand watch against England.

      Last edited by Skoblin; 06 Apr 10, 17:19.

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      • #4
        August 1940. German engineers and Reich Labour Service (RAD) personnel rebuild a railway bridge over a Norwegian river.


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        • #5
          August 1940. French workers at the Paris Citroen factory resume production.


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          • #6
            good footage, skob...

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            • #7
              August 1940. Acrobats on the high wire and other contraptions provide entertainment for a summertime audience in Berlin.


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              • #8
                August 1940. German women compete during the women diving championship in Berlin.


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                • #9
                  August 1940. Hitler speech in Berlin to commemorate to the German victory over France in the summer of 1940. German troops march under the Brandenburg Gate and are greeted by enthusiastic German crowds.


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                  • #10
                    August 1940. The Haus der Kunst (literally House of Art) is an art museum in Munich, Germany. The building was constructed from 1934 to 1937 following plans of architect Paul Ludwig Troost as the Third Reich's first monumental structure of Nazi architecture and as Nazi propaganda. The museum, then called Haus der deutschen Kunst ("House of German Art"), was opened in March 1937 as a showcase for what the Third Reich regarded as Germany's finest art. The inaugural exhibition was the Große Deutsche Kunstausstellung ("Great German art exhibition"), which was intended as an edifying contrast to the condemned modern art on display in the concurrent Entartete Kunst exhibition.

                    Deutsche Wochenschau version



                    Vichy newsreel version showing Hitler, Goebbels and various German dignitaries.


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                    • #11
                      August 1940. Das braune Band von Deutschland was a horse race run in Germany from 1934 to 1944. Established by the Munchen-Reim horse club in Munich, the race offered a grand prize of 100,000 reichsmarks - the largest sports prize in National-Socialist Germany.


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                      • #12
                        August 1940. Carl Hagenbeck (June 10, 1844 - April 14, 1913) was a merchant of wild animals who supplied many European zoos, as well as P.T. Barnum. He is often considered the father of the modern zoo because he introduced "natural" animal enclosures that included recreations of animals' native habitats without bars. Hagenbeck founded Germany's most successful privately owned zoo, the Tierpark Hagenbeck, which moved to its present location in Hamburg's Stellingen quarter in 1907.
                        In 1875, Hagenbeck began to exhibit his animals in all the large cities of Europe as well as in the United States. Hagenbeck also trained animals to display and sell to circuses at the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois, in 1893, and the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in St. Louis in 1904. Hagenbeck's circus was one of the most popular attractions. His collection included large animals and reptiles. Many of the animals were trained to do tricks. Hagenbeck's trained animals also performed at amusement parks on New York City's Coney Island prior to 1914.
                        However, Hagenbeck dreamed of a permanent exhibit where animals could live in surroundings much like their natural homes. Despite the presence of the Zoological Garden of Hamburg, Hagenbeck opened his great zoo, the Tierpark Hagenbeck at Stellingen, near Hamburg in 1907. Today his ideas are followed by most large zoos.


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                        • #13
                          August 1940. Dutch schoolchildren are sent to Gmunden, Austria to enjoy the holidays along the Rhine river. Dr. Artur Seyss-Inquart, Reichskommissar of German-occupied Netherlands, is seen at the train station in the opening scenes.


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