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  • #46
    Originally posted by olivenstein View Post
    No problem--I'll try to find more films. This Arab girlie-girl on YouTube has these romantic Egyptian movies from the 1950s with Hamida & Omar Sharif; but there's one dealing with this couple in Gaza called "Land of Peace" from 1957 a year after the Suez/Sinai War.
    These were very populer over here too, especially back when there was only 1 Israeli channel...

    We call it 'Friday's afternoon Arab movie', its a very known concept...

    Golani, this may be a controversial question as you are not sephardic; but what do you think of the portrayal of sephardim in "Sallah Shabati"?

    According to wikipedia.org (not always the best source of information, mind you, but here it is) in 1964, many high-level socialist Ashkenazim like Golda Meyer did not want this film to be screened outside of Israel as it showed mizrahim in ugly, poor camps...

    Aren't sephardim still disenfranchized in the "development towns", or is it partly there own responsibility for not trying harder and waiting for the government to help them?
    That's a toughie...

    Look, there's a need to understand that the government from 1948 (and well before) until 1977 was Ashkenazi-socialist (on the line with communist) and even though most of them were not born in Israel were very proud of the Israeli-born-Jew (sabra) image.
    So anyone not fitting with this checklist was looked down at.
    Holocaust survivors weren't brave enough, the exilic Jew wasn't 'sabra' like enough the "Beitar" people weren't socialist and so on.

    So yes, they did suffer alot from discrimination, but so did others...

    Like you mention I'm not Sphardic, so my families' life was supposed to be perfect, right? wrong.

    My dad's parents came here in 1934 and their ideology wasn't fitting with that of Mapai (the rolling political party) so they had been forbidden to be employed by anyone until they got the red party registry (which they didn't get BTW, they opend their own grocery store and did pretty good).

    My mom's family came here in 1957, both parents were Holocaust survives from Poland, they were housed in the same tents and tin shacks you saw on Salah Shabati (called a "Ma'abara" or transit camp) and were only able to move to a kibbutz several years later with the help of a family member which had connections in the government.

    Now days there is no difference between Ashkenazim and Spharadim what so ever, in terms of official attitude.
    There are some stuff left, most of the development town population is still Saphardic, but that's because they were born there, its just a result of the previous years, same goes for the mainly Ashkenazic kibbutz.
    But on the spotlights of discrimination today are the Ethiopian Jews...
    Last edited by Golani; 03 Jul 09, 03:20.

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    • #47
      "Enfants de tous pays"

      I hope that you weren't offended by my question, Golani. The situation in your country must have been a lot more complex than what is presented in documentaries. Are you very close to your grandparents? I was with mine--they always had an illuminating story to tell.

      Ten years ago, for fun I said 'Free Aryeh Deri' and said I was going to go on a hunger strike till he was released from prison to my Israeli roommate/girlfriend at the time (1999/2000) when we were living in Brussels. She got angry for saying that I was irresponsible--both her parents were sabras, and although her mother is of Ottoman sephardic origin, she was cagey living amongst them in South Tel Aviv near the central bus station, after having had her brand-new Kawasaki Ninja motorcycle stolen.

      France and Belgium's cities have both the biggest Jewish and Arab populations of any European country, and more than half of the former are sepharades or "juifs pieds noirs". Most came from Algeria, Tunisia, and Morrocco. Funny thing was when her friends came to visit, they would say of Brussels or Paris that, the rainy weather notwithstanding, it was "just like Israel"!

      Interestingly, and still from a French viewpoint, that although there used to be (and still is among certain Catholic right-wingers) ugly predjudice against Eastern-European Jews as there is against the Arabs in Paris, Brussels, Lille, Strasbourg, Lyon, etc...there is practically no ill feeling against the "pied noir" Jews.

      The French feel comfortable with the sephardim (and the black Africans) because they were loyal during the Algerian War, and also that they tend to be care-free, open, love to party, and are not very competitive in school or in French affairs, and also their musical way of talking makes the French laugh. Like...Enrico Macias! ("Enfants de tous pays.... ")

      Also Frenchmen are attracted to all the young Arab girls they see in the streets; but are frustrated by the definite instant "don't touch" by the young Arab males hovering around (which is hypocritical with all the young Frenchwomen that are raped and beaten by many Arab gangs month after month). A sephardic girl is a lot less dangerous and you can still eat good couscous.

      Heboulah!

      Laurent.

      P.S.: I have the impression the Ethiopians make good soldiers with their history of resisting with their emperor Hailli Sellaissi (sp?), is that true?



      Originally posted by Golani View Post
      These were very populer over here too, especially back when there was only 1 Israeli channel...

      We call it 'Friday's afternoon Arab movie', its a very known concept...


      That's a toughie...

      Look, there's a need to understand that the government from 1948 (and well before) until 1977 was Ashkenazi-socialist (on the line with communist) and even though most of them were not born in Israel were very proud of the Israeli-born-Jew (sabra) image.
      So anyone not fitting with this checklist was looked down at.
      Holocaust survivors weren't brave enough, the exilic Jew wasn't 'sabra' like enough the "Beitar" people weren't socialist and so on.

      So yes, they did suffer alot from discrimination, but so did others...

      Like you mention I'm not Sphardic, so my families' life was supposed to be perfect, right? wrong.

      My dad's parents came here in 1934 and their ideology wasn't fitting with that of Mapai (the rolling political party) so they had been forbidden to be employed by anyone until they got the red party registry (which they didn't get BTW, they opend their own grocery store and did pretty good).

      My mom's family came here in 1957, both parents were Holocaust survives from Poland, they were housed in the same tents and tin shacks you saw on Salah Shabati (called a "Ma'abara" or transit camp) and were only able to move to a kibbutz several years later with the help of a family member which had connections in the government.

      Now days there is no difference between Ashkenazim and Spharadim what so ever, in terms of official attitude.
      There are some stuff left, most of the development town population is still Saphardic, but that's because they were born there, its just a result of the previous years, same goes for the mainly Ashkenazic kibbutz.
      But on the spotlights of discrimination today are the Ethiopian Jews...

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