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  • Skoblin
    replied
    1941 0nj board the HMS Warspite

    April 1941. Footage of the British battleship, HMS Warspite, following the battle of Cape Matapan against the Italian navy. HMS Warspite (pennant number 03) was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship of the British Royal Navy. She was launched on 26 November 1913 at Devonport Royal Dockyard. She was, and is, one of the most famous and glamorous of names in the Royal Navy. Warspite would, during World War II, gain the nickname "The Grand Old Lady", after a comment made by Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham in 1943.From 27 to 29 March, 1941, Warspite took part as the flagship of Admiral Cunningham in the Battle of Cape Matapan, in which three Italian heavy cruisers and two destroyers were sunk in a night action. On 21 April, 1941, still under Cunningham's command, Warspite along with battleships Barham and Valiant, as well as the cruiser Gloucester and various destroyers, attacked Tripoli harbour. Warspite also took part in the naval portion of the Battle of Crete, where she was badly damaged by German bombers. Warspite's sister ships were all sunk or heavily damaged during their time in the Mediterranean. HMS Barham was torpedoed and sunk by a submarine, and Valiant and Queen Elizabeth both spent time resting on the bottom of Alexandria harbour after their hulls were holed in an attack by Italian frogmen. Warspite stayed afloat but was damaged several times.

    Last edited by Skoblin; 11 Oct 09, 20:01.

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  • Skoblin
    replied
    1939 HMS Courageous sunk

    September, 1939. HMS Courageous was a warship of the Royal Navy. She was built at the Armstrong Whitworth shipyard as a "large light cruiser". Courageous, her sister HMS Glorious, and half-sister HMS Furious, were the brainchildren of Admiral Jackie Fisher, and were designed to be "light cruiser destroyers". They were originally intended to be heavy support for shallow water operations in the Baltic, which ultimately never came to pass.

    The design was for a light battlecruiser; while having 15-inch guns, she was actually classed by the British Navy as a light cruiser because of her light armour protection. Her keel was laid down on 28 March 1915, the ship was launched 5 February 1916, completed on 28 October 1916, and Courageous was commissioned on 4 November 1916. Courageous saw action in World War I, and then was converted into an aircraft carrier.

    Courageous served with the Home Fleet in the Channel Force at the start of World War II. On 17
    September 1939, under the command of Captain W. T. Mackaig-Jones, she was on an anti-submarine patrol off the coast of Ireland. Two of her four escorting destroyers had been sent to help a merchant ship under attack. During this time, Courageous was stalked for over two hours by the U-29, commanded by Kapitšnleutnant Otto Schuhart. Then Courageous turned into the wind to launch her aircraft. This manoeuvre put the ship right across the bow of the U-29, which then fired three torpedoes. Two of the torpedoes struck the ship on her port side, and she capsized and sank in 15 minutes with the loss of 518 of her crew, including her captain. She was the first British warship to be lost in the war; the civilian passenger liner Athenia having been sunk two weeks earlier.



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  • Torien
    replied
    What a horrible accident. They opened the hangar door before surfacing?

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Heard of these, nice to see film on them.
    Last edited by Skoblin; 12 Mar 09, 12:47.

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  • Skoblin
    replied
    1931/32 The HMS M2 submarine

    1931. HMS M2 was a Royal Navy aircraft-carrying submarine shipwrecked in Lyme Bay, Dorset, Britain, on 26 January 1932. She was one of three M class boats completed.Four M-class submarines replaced the order for the last four K class, K17-K21. Although they were similar in size, the M-class was an entirely different design from the K-class although it is possible that some material ordered for the K-boats went into them. In any event, the end of the First World War meant that only three were completed. The M2 was laid down at Vickers shipyard at Barrow in Furness in 1916, and launched in 1919. Like the other members of her class she was armed with a single 12-inch (305 mm) gun as well as torpedo tubes. The Mark IX gun was taken from spares held for the Formidable class of battleships. The British M class submarines were very large for the time at 296 feet long. They were designed to operate as part of the main fleet of battleships and so needed to be fast. They displaced 1,600 tonnes on the surface and 1,950 when submerged. Two twelve-cylinder diesel engines powered them on the surface producing 2400hp, underwater they were driven by electric motors producing 1,500 hp (1,100 kW). The maximum speed on the surface was 15.5kn, which proved to be slower than the newer battleships and the concept of fleet submarines was soon scrapped, with the River class of submarines being the last.
    After the accidental sinking of HMS M1 in 1925, M2 and her sister M3 were taken out of service and reassigned for experimental use. She had her gun removed because of the limit in submarine gun calibre of 8 inches imposed by the Washington Naval Treaty, and it was replaced by a small aircraft hangar, the work being completed in 1928. This could carry a small Parnall Peto seaplane, specially designed for the M2 and which could be launched by hydraulic catapult within a few minutes of surfacing. The aircraft would land alongside the submarine on completion of its sortie and be winched aboard using a crane. The submarine was to operate ahead of the battle fleet in a reconnaissance role, flying off her seaplane as a scout.



    February 1932. M2 left her base at Portland on 26 January 1932, for an exercise in West Bay, Dorset carrying Parnall Peto serial N255. Her last communication was a radio message at 10:11 to her Submarine depot ship, HMS Titania to announce that she would dive at 10:30 am. The captain of a passing merchant ship, the Newcastle coaster Tynsider, mentioned that he had seen a large submarine dive stern first at around 11:15. Unaware of the significance of this, he only reported it in passing once he reached port.
    Her crew of 60 were all killed in the accident. The submarine was found on 3 February, eight days after her loss. Ernest Cox, the salvage expert who had raised the German battleships at Scapa Flow, was hired to salvage the M2. In an operation lasting nearly a year and 1,500 dives, on 8 December 1932, she was lifted to within six metres of the surface before a gale sprang up, sending her down to her final resting place. The hangar door was found open and the aircraft still in it. The accident was believed to be due to water entering the submarine through the hangar door, which had been opened to launch the aircraft shortly after surfacing.
    After the loss of M2 the Royal Navy abandoned submarine-launched aircraft, although other navies experimented with the concept in the interwar years. Possibly the last and the most impressive aircraft-carrying submarines were the Japanese Sen Toku class which were three times the size of M2.

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  • Torien
    replied
    Was that someone I should know doing the christening?

    Good stuff, as always Skoblin!

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  • Skoblin
    replied
    1932 Launch of the HMS Swordfish

    January 1931. The Royal Navy launches the submarine HMS Swordfish. HMS Swordfish (61S) was a group one British S class submarine that was sunk on a combat patrol in the English Channel in November 1940 during the Second World War. Nothing was heard from her following her departure from Portsmouth on 7 November 1940 with 40 crew onboard to relieve HMS Usk which was on patrol off the Western Approaches near Brest, France. At the time it was thought that she had been sunk by a German destroyer. However she was discovered by a local diver in 1983, split into two halves just forward of the gun by a mine. The wreck lies in about 46 metres of water roughly 12 miles south of St. Catherines Head, Isle of Wight. It is likely that she struck the mine shortly after sailing whilst carrying out a trim dive. The wrecksite is designated as a protected place under the Protection of Military Remains Act 1986.



    (more)

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  • Torien
    replied
    So why have the side firing guns at all?

    Were they afraid of pirates? Going to do a broadside at 10 miles?

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  • Admiral
    replied
    Gun platform stability!

    Both vessels were relatively stable gun platforms...

    If Q were super-firing from '2 decks higher', the vessels higher center of gravity would have made their stability terrible.

    Remember, if you raise the gunhouse, all else in the barbet comes with, as well as a need for even more armour.


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  • Torien
    replied
    I read the post skoblin, but why would that "Q" battery have been lower than the one in front of it?

    Anybody?

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  • Skoblin
    replied
    1931 HMS Rodney and HMS Nelson

    The Nelson class was a class of two battleships of the British Royal Navy, built shortly after, and under the terms of, the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922. They were the first British battleships built since the Revenge class (ordered in 1913) and their orders were not followed until the King George V class of 1936. In order that they comply with the limitations of the Washington treaty, these ships were of an unusual design with many novel features. In order to reduce the weight of armour, the main gun turrets were mounted all forward, shortening the necessary armoured length. All three were in front of the bridge; 'B' was mounted superfiring over 'A', with 'Q' turret at the main deck level behind 'B', and therefore unable to fire directly forward or aft. The large superstructure, which was triangular in plan, was sometimes referred to as the "Queen Anne's Mansions", from its similarity to a 14-storey brick residential development of the same name, opposite St. James's Park underground railway station in London.Their main armament of 16-inch (406 mm) guns were mounted in triple turrets, the only RN battleships with this feature. The guns themselves were a step away from standard British designs. Where previous RN weapons fired heavy shells at a moderate velocity, the Nelson's weapons followed the German practice of a lighter shell at a higher velocity.Because of their unusual silhouette, HMS Nelson and her sister Rodney were sarcastically nicknamed Nelsol and Rodnol by the Royal Navy - their manoeuvrability issues and single-funnelled silhouettes reminded Navy men of oil tankers, and a series of fleet oilers had been built during the First World War that bore names ending in "ol".

    Synopsis:
    1. Front view - HMS Queen Elizabeth and HMS Valiant
    2. Side view - HMS Nelson
    3. On deck view of turrets - HMS Rodney
    4. Planes flying over the HMS Rodney
    5. Rear view of HMS Valiant and HMS Queen Elizabeth, HMS Nelson turning
    6. HMS Queen Elizabeth, HMS Rodney and HMS Nelson in row
    7. Anchor on board the HMS Rodney.

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  • Nick the Noodle
    replied
    Originally posted by skoblin View Post
    Just found a video of the HMS Rodney from early 1930s. Will post tomorrow.
    Looking forward to it.

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  • Skoblin
    replied
    Just found a video of the HMS Rodney from early 1930s. Will post tomorrow.

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  • Skoblin
    replied
    1931 The Royal Navy at Kiel

    1931. Units of the British Royal Navy make a hospitality visit to the German naval base at Kiel. The first meeting of the fleets since the end of World War I.

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  • Achtung Baby
    replied
    Thanks skoblin, the videos were very interesting to watch. Although I did find it a bit sad watching the second video, to see all the faces of those men and their families, some openly emotional to see them back home... and knowing what happened to the ship later that year!

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