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New Generationals Aren't Interested In Real History

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  • #16
    That I don't know, but to follow the Amber trail for instance takes you straight through ancient European history touching on the Normans, Germans, Celts, Romans, Greeks and early Russians.

    You could hang a curriculum for an entire year of history class on that.

    http://www.greenways.by/index.php?co...id=110&lang=en

    Did the original Americans use the Missouri river for transcontinental trade ?
    Last edited by Snowygerry; 26 Aug 16, 08:37.
    High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
      That I don't know, but to follow the Amber trail for instance takes you straight through ancient European history touching on the Normans, Germans, Celts, Romans, Greeks and early Russians.

      You could hang a curriculum for an entire year of history class on that.

      http://www.greenways.by/index.php?co...id=110&lang=en

      Did the original Americans use the Missouri river for transcontinental trade ?
      River travel was, generally, easier and faster than ground transport ("hoof and sole") in stages across the country. The canal building era in the US is a rather understudied topic, I think. The Mississippi for north/south travel, the Ohio for travel from the east and the Missouri, to carry on westward, were major thoroughfares. And they came together very near St. Louis. This is one reason the building of the Eades Bridge over the Big Muddy was so important.
      Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
      Hyperwar, Whats New
      World War II Resources
      The best place in the world to "work".

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      • #18
        Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
        River travel was, generally, easier and faster than ground transport ("hoof and sole") in stages across the country. The canal building era in the US is a rather understudied topic, I think. The Mississippi for north/south travel, the Ohio for travel from the east and the Missouri, to carry on westward, were major thoroughfares. And they came together very near St. Louis. This is one reason the building of the Eades Bridge over the Big Muddy was so important.
        Ah but those are the colonists - I meant the native Americans in what's known here as "ancient times", the amber trail can be traced back to before written history, is there any archaeological evidence for similar trade routes in North America ?
        High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
          Ah but those are the colonists - I meant the native Americans in what's known here as "ancient times", the amber trail can be traced back to before written history, is there any archaeological evidence for similar trade routes in North America ?
          We know they built boats, so river travel would have been an option for them. There are suggestions that the Cahokia mound builders used the rivers to keep their "empire" in communication with satellite colonies and other peoples. The First Nations people in the Rockies showed Lewis and Clark how to build round boats from local materials to expedite their travel to the Pacific.
          Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
          Hyperwar, Whats New
          World War II Resources
          The best place in the world to "work".

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
            Your voicing an opinion with out facts. You do know about opinions?

            To save the lazy

            http://ndp.wikia.com/wiki/List_of_ce...mocratic_Party

            Really Charlton Heston isnít dead? He must be really retired than since I havenít heard anything about him in several years.
            Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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            • #21
              I got his rifle, so his fingers must be cold and dead.
              Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
              Hyperwar, Whats New
              World War II Resources
              The best place in the world to "work".

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              • #22
                Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
                We know they built boats, so river travel would have been an option for them. There are suggestions that the Cahokia mound builders used the rivers to keep their "empire" in communication with satellite colonies and other peoples. The First Nations people in the Rockies showed Lewis and Clark how to build round boats from local materials to expedite their travel to the Pacific.
                I see, obviously you'd need some trade good from which the source is easily traced and that leaves archaeological evidence, if the First Nation people limited their trade to "perishable" goods, evidence for their transcontinental travels may be hard to find.
                High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.

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                • #23
                  There were trade routes across America. Marine shells were one such trade good. Copper was another trade good. Some was from the Great Lakes and some was from North Canada.

                  There is a site near Slidell, Louisiana where they found Copper was melted down and cast into "oxhide ingots". The Mouth of the Mississippi was quite close to the area 2000 years ago.

                  Pruitt
                  Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                  Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                  by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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                  • #24
                    Thanks, pre colonial American history is an area I really don't know much about...
                    High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Tsar View Post
                      Really Charlton Heston isnít dead? He must be really retired than since I havenít heard anything about him in several years.
                      He died in 2008.


                      Charlton Heston Obituary

                      10/4/1923 - 4/5/2008





                      LOS ANGELES (AP) - Charlton Heston, who won the 1959 best actor Oscar as the chariot-racing "Ben-Hur" and portrayed Moses, Michelangelo, El Cid and other heroic figures in movie epics of the '50s and '60s, has died. He was 84.

                      The actor died Saturday night at his home in Beverly Hills with his wife Lydia at his side, family spokesman Bill Powers said.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                        He died in 2008.


                        Charlton Heston Obituary

                        10/4/1923 - 4/5/2008



                        If you had followed the thread back to the beginning of the discussion about him you would have found that HPJ said that he was alive, my claim was that he was dead and that only Democrats count the dead as alive.
                        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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                        • #27
                          There is a football stadium in Lafayette, Louisiana that hosts the ULL "Ragin' Cajuns" football games. Across the street from it is an old cemetery. The wags say that these graves are counted as fans in the stands every home game for the Ragin' Cajuns! The school has to show the NCAA that they average over a certain number of fans per years to stay in FBS Football. The humorous part is the NCAA never checks these figures...

                          Pruitt
                          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Darth Holliday View Post
                            I thought he was from the Kinks....
                            A good thought -but that was Ray DAVIES.
                            "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                            Samuel Johnson.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                              There is a football stadium in Lafayette, Louisiana that hosts the ULL "Ragin' Cajuns" football games. Across the street from it is an old cemetery. The wags say that these graves are counted as fans in the stands every home game for the Ragin' Cajuns! The school has to show the NCAA that they average over a certain number of fans per years to stay in FBS Football. The humorous part is the NCAA never checks these figures...

                              Pruitt
                              We have some football teams over here that one wonders if that is how they source some of the players and almost certainly the manager.
                              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                              • #30
                                I regret the post in one of my 1st times here on this site. I stand by my liberal bias, on college campuses, and media, but leave it at that. Just wished to mention Ray Davis, USMC, WW2, Korea, Vietnam, and a Medal of Honor Reciprent. He had to got thru the hell of Peleliu in WW2, as a Captain, and was perhaps the most important figure involved in saving the USMC, in their " attacking in a different direction as O.P. Smith said, and keeping the Marines alive thru his actions. A brave, humble, brilliant man, and type of role model a movie should have been done on, but not politically correct to make a film on a guy like him. And by the way, I'm a Kinks fan too, but people like USMC Ray don't get the publicity, he didn't want it, he had more, immortal respect as a warrior and family man.

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