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Best War Movies (that aren't)

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Tommy Atkins View Post
    In this case the American director Sidney Lumet bought a bit of gold to the screen imo.
    Sidney Lumet passed away today.

    Great director!

    http://movies.yahoo.com/news/movies....tor-dies-ap?nc
    Last edited by Captain General; 09 Apr 11, 17:47.
    "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

    Homer


    BoRG

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    • #47
      Originally posted by Captain General View Post
      Sideny Lumet passed away today.

      Great director!

      http://movies.yahoo.com/news/movies....tor-dies-ap?nc
      I was unaware of that. Thank's for bearing the sad news General. The phrase, "why can't they make them like that anymore" could have been invented for Lumet. He has left behind some of the best movies ever made. My personal favorites being:

      The Hill
      12 Angry Men
      Dog Day Afternoon

      For those alone my life has been the richer and I owe him my gratitude.

      Rest in Peace.

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      • #48
        Originally posted by Tommy Atkins View Post
        Warmoviebuff... Great contribution and good debate stimulating stuff. I disagree with a couple of your choices though:

        For me a "war movie" must have at it's core men/women fighting an enemy in a war, (sounds obvious).
        So I agree that that the prisoner of war flicks, King Rat, Great Escape, Stalag 17, River Kwai... Are indeed all "war movies". They are about men fighting the enemy in a war, not as a peripheral theme but central to the plot. The men may be in captivity but they are fighting the enemy every bit as much as their comrades on the outside. There may be other themese but the central one is men fighting a war.

        However... The Hill...
        Where are the enemy? Where is the war? It is about Brits being bastards to other Brits! Actually what the film is about is British society and it's (then) adherence to to a rigid class based code which dictates that YOU DON'T CHALLENGE AUTHORITY. You do as you are told and keep your mouth shut. This is the natural order of things. To challenge your superiors is to challenge the fabric of society itself and there lies anarchy. "The Hill" (a big sand heap that the prisoners are made to run up) is a metaphor for how the establishment will break you if you don't conform. yada yada yada.

        It is set during world war two in a BRITISH army prison camp for BRITISH soldiers. The "enemy" as such are the British "screws" who's blind obediance to this "code" is threatened by prisoner Seargeant Connery. The war as such it was, was just a device to put these characters in a position to challenge the accepted order of things and explore what the movie was really about.

        This in my view makes it not a "war movie" as the war barely features and the "enemy" doesn't feature at all. If the Hill is a war movie, it is one where the war and the enemy are absent. They do not even feature as a theoretical psychological threat.The film set during wartime is about other things although it does have men in uniform in it.

        (BTW... a foreigner can often see the idiosynchrosies in a society that the locals miss. In this case the American director Sidney Lumet bought a bit of gold to the screen imo.)

        I also don't think that From Here to Eternity qualifies as a war movie. From what I can remember it's a soap opera about new recruits, a bully, and some tasty women, with a Japanese raid thrown in at the end. Very little in the way of war... but much about the nature of conformity and the like. In fact THE MOVIE IS SET IN PEACE TIME apart from the last few minutes were the raid is tacked on so Montgomery Clift can die a heroes death.
        First, thank you for starting this thread, it has been fun. I have no problems with your exceptions. To tell the truth, I have not seen "The Hill". I assumed it was a typical POW movie. It is in two of my three main sources for war movie reviews. "From Here to Eternity" is in all three, but I am open to excluding it from the genre.

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        • #49
          Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
          First, thank you for starting this thread, it has been fun. I have no problems with your exceptions. To tell the truth, I have not seen "The Hill". I assumed it was a typical POW movie. It is in two of my three main sources for war movie reviews. "From Here to Eternity" is in all three, but I am open to excluding it from the genre.

          Fair enough Moviebuff. It's not an exact science is it? It all just opinion so in that sense there is no right or wrong. Glad you're enjoying the thread. Me too! I've been reminded of some great movies i'd forgotten about. Still kicking myself for missing Casablanca though.

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          • #50
            Alec Guiness Brilliant as a C.O. taking rank and authority all a bit too seriously.


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            • #51
              Originally posted by Tommy Atkins View Post
              Alec Guiness Brilliant as a C.O. taking rank and authority all a bit too seriously.


              Always wanted to see that one. Hard to find.
              "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

              Homer


              BoRG

              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by Captain General View Post
                Always wanted to see that one. Hard to find.
                General,
                It's been years since I've seen it but remember really liking it. It's about Guiness having trouble relinquishing power to a new C.O. and group dynamics in the officers mess. I'll say no more for fear of spoiling it for you in the off chance that you do track it down.

                By the way... haven't got around to paying respect for Night of the Generals. great call

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                • #53
                  Originally posted by The Doctor View Post
                  I'd rep you again... But I just repped you for The Caine Mutiny...

                  The Wind and the Lion, The Sand Pebbles and Seven Days in May would be my three picks.

                  Okay good but how about the HBO remake titled " The Enemy Within . " After all we all had the pleasure of looking at Dana Delany sit down and cross her long shapely legs .

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                  • #54
                    How about this one...



                    I'm secure enough in my own sexuality to admit that I really love this film, even the soppy bits. I'm a big David Lean fan but had avoided this one for years on the grounds that it's a chick flick, (which it certainly is).

                    There is just one thing i'm not so hot on... Lean, no doubt with one eye on the box office receipts cast a Hollywood big hitter amongst all those British character actors. He did this in "Lawrence" too but I think it really worked for Anthony Quinn as the role of Auda called for a stand out, larger than life personality.

                    But Rod Steiger in Zhivago with all that "method" intensity seems a little out of place to me.
                    Last edited by Tommy Atkins; 12 Apr 11, 10:59.

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                    • #55
                      One movie that rarely ever gets mentioned which I really enjoyed was "The Victors" starring George Peppard and George Hamilton (pre-tan)

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                      • #56
                        Originally posted by Tommy Atkins View Post
                        How about this one...



                        I'm secure enough in my own sexuality to admit that I really love this film, even the soppy bits. I'm a big David Lean fan but had avoided this one for years on the grounds that it's a chick flick, (which it certainly is).

                        There is just one thing i'm not so hot on... Lean, no doubt with one eye on the box office receipts cast a Hollywood big hitter amongst all those British character actors. He did this in "Lawrence" too but I think it really worked for Anthony Quinn as the role of Auda called for a stand out, larger than life personality.

                        But Rod Steiger in Zhivago with all that "method" intensity seems a little out of place to me.
                        I'm with you on this one.

                        I love it! Great film.
                        "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                        Homer


                        BoRG

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Dunnigan View Post
                          One movie that rarely ever gets mentioned which I really enjoyed was "The Victors" starring George Peppard and George Hamilton (pre-tan)
                          Another really good one.

                          "The blade itself incites to deeds of violence".

                          Homer


                          BoRG

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            A Matter of Life and Death



                            On the surface a romance but it actually deals with one of the great issues of war... Death!

                            Niven is a pilot, (deceased), who's spirit is fighting the gods for his right to stay on Earth as a terrestial being on a technicality. Those that claim to know say that this 1946 movie was so popular because it touched a nerve amongst movie goers at a time when so many of them were morning the loss of loved ones.

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