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  • "I, Robot" movie

    Does anyone know about the new "I, Robot" movie staring Will Smith? I tried to check out the site, but their was some problem with Flash. How close is it to the original book?
    "You realize that if I could actually purchase a weapon, I would stab you with it now?" --Roy, Order of the Stick #136

    Governor of South Florida, Cuba, Louisiana, Manhattan, Hawaii, Illinois, Moon and Mars. Chief of Cybernetics Div., S.INC

  • #2
    He plays a detective who is investigating the murder of a human by a robot. Now according to Asimovs Three Rules, this is impossible and no one really believes him. The robots have become aware of their own will and humanity as it were and want to become free. Then on the eve of the largest robotics distribution ever (1 robot to every 5 humans) the bots go cuckoo and now the humans have to fight and win, or become obsolete.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Storm
      He plays a detective who is investigating the murder of a human by a robot. Now according to Asimovs Three Rules, this is impossible and no one really believes him. The robots have become aware of their own will and humanity as it were and want to become free. Then on the eve of the largest robotics distribution ever (1 robot to every 5 humans) the bots go cuckoo and now the humans have to fight and win, or become obsolete.
      Is this the basic plot in the book?
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      • #4
        As a huge fan of film, I classify this film as: Crap.
        “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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        • #5
          Aw come on, it's got all the makings of.... any other movie with lots of CGI some one-liners and nothing else...
          If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.

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          • #6
            Isn't this similar to the Terminator series? Machines created by man, become self-aware and want to destroy mankind? I'll wait 'til it comes our on DVD before seeing it.
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            • #7
              Assimov came up with this decades ago... Terminator is loosely based on his writing...

              Actually I, Robot the book (rereading it now) is a collection of short stories as most SF was.

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              • #8
                Asimov certainly gets the credit for the ideas behind Terminator and Matrix (in each case machines rise up against humanity... they just won in Matrix and the fight was basically over) and most sci-fi in general. He and Clarke (and earlier Vernes) got the sci-fi ball rolling if you will.
                If voting could really change things, it would be illegal.

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                • #9
                  I think I read somewhere (Heinlein's Expanded Universe, I think) that Asimov (or other sci-fi writers of his day) worked on the Manhattan Project. Anyone know anything about this?
                  "You realize that if I could actually purchase a weapon, I would stab you with it now?" --Roy, Order of the Stick #136

                  Governor of South Florida, Cuba, Louisiana, Manhattan, Hawaii, Illinois, Moon and Mars. Chief of Cybernetics Div., S.INC

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                  • #10
                    The crucial point of Asimov's original stories involves the three rules that dictate how AI should act.

                    1. A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

                    2. A robot must obey orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.

                    3. A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.
                    There's been expansions and refinements for these laws, but they're the basis for a lot of science fiction (and to some extent science) in the area of robotics.
                    “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Patrocles
                      Is this the basic plot in the book?
                      No.

                      Dr. S.
                      Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Overseer
                        The crucial point of Asimov's original stories involves the three rules that dictate how AI should act.
                        And, if you've read the Foundation series which is linked - there's also the "Zeroth Law", which was postulated by the Robots themselves.

                        Dr. S.
                        Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

                        www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

                        www.tabletown.co.uk

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Doctor Sinister
                          And, if you've read the Foundation series which is linked - there's also the "Zeroth Law", which was postulated by the Robots themselves.

                          Dr. S.

                          The first Foundation book was one of my favorite all time books. The second was okay, and then third is where I draw the line with the series.
                          “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Overseer
                            The first Foundation book was one of my favorite all time books. The second was okay, and then third is where I draw the line with the series.
                            You ought to at least read the rest of the genuine Asimov-penned stories. Some familiar characters make an appearance...

                            Dr. S.
                            Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

                            www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

                            www.tabletown.co.uk

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                            • #15
                              I actually think I read the fourth one, but seeing as I'm not entirely sure, that should tell you of my impression of it. I will give them a try again sometime, right after I finally get around to giving the later Frank Herbert Dune books a try again.
                              “To discriminate against a thoroughly upright citizen because he belongs to some particular church, or because, like Abraham Lincoln, he has not avowed his allegiance to any church, is an outrage against that liberty of conscience which is one of the foundations of American life.”

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