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  • Bad Movie Reviews

    I was browsing through IMDB and thought it would be fun to read some reviews of some bad movies. So I checked reviews for The Thin Red Line. It's amazing how many people thought that poorly filmed snooze fest was an excellent film. Here are some excerpts:

    The Thin Red Line is sometimes painful to watch, but only because of its realistic juxtaposition of humanity, philosophy, and the terror of war.
    Well at least the first part was right.

    The film does not delve into any historical fact about Guadalcanal
    Actually it kind of blows off historical fact altogether.

    the film is carried by Jim Caviezel as the beautiful and ethereal private Witt. words can not describe this performance. with as few lines as he had
    As few lines as he had?! He wouldn't shut up until the Japanese shot him and put a merciful end to his annoying voice overs.

    i went to the theatre myself, and came out three hours later, went home, and i cried
    So did I, that's three hours of my life I'll never get back.
    A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

  • #2
    I thought it was a good film, myself. Even bought it on DVD.

    Comment


    • #3
      As to where “Band of Brothers” and “Saving Private Ryan” ruined most other war films for me, “The Thin Red Line” made every other movie seem just that much better. I have tried countless times to watch it, yet try as I might I can’t make it through without getting so aggravated. It’s almost like the war version of Kevin Costner’s “The Untouchables” , enough basis in fact that you can place it in a historical reference yet so much crap that you’ve no idea what really happened.

      Great review Pirateship1982!
      “All take off’s are optional . . . . All landings are mandatory”

      "If you do things like you've always done, you'll get what you've always gotten"

      http://catawissagazetteer.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by DC Usher View Post
        As to where “Band of Brothers” and “Saving Private Ryan” ruined most other war films for me, “The Thin Red Line” made every other movie seem just that much better. I have tried countless times to watch it, yet try as I might I can’t make it through without getting so aggravated. It’s almost like the war version of Kevin Costner’s “The Untouchables” , enough basis in fact that you can place it in a historical reference yet so much crap that you’ve no idea what really happened.

        Great review Pirateship1982!
        It's a shame since the Pacific Theater is so underrepresented in cinema. The Thin Red Line clearly had the funding to be good. But poorly choreographed battle scenes and a lot of unneccessary voice overs and flashbacks detracted from the movie in a most fatal manner. This was a case of Hollywood filming what they who never fired a shot off of a soundstage thought war was like rather than actually researching to see how US GIs thought, behaved, and fought.

        Hopefully they crank out that Pacific version of Band of Brothers that so far remains only in rumor. Because Windtalkers sucked also so that just leaves us with Flags of our Fathers and The Great Raid.
        A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

        Comment


        • #5
          I think the problem here is that "The Thin Red Line" is not a war movie - at least according to the traditional understanding. Nor is it an "anti-war movie". Rather, it is a philosophical study of men in combat - the same as the book was. The constant voice overs were an integral part of the film, as the film deals with the thoughts, feelings, and notions that go through minds of soldiers before, during and after battle - and these feelings and thoughts often have nothing to do with the actual combat they are experiencing. If you bother reading about the author of the book, James Jones, you will see that he actually had combat experience at Guadalcanal, and the movie - although naturally limited in the ability to fully represent a book - is a general faithful representation of Jone's work - which was never intended to be a factual narrative of Guadalcanal. You cannot compare it to Saving Private Ryan or Band of Brothers, simply because it was never intended to be same type of movie. If you are looking for an equivalent, you would have to consider the Soviet movie - Idi i Smotri or perhaps the German film Die Brucke. I will agree - it is not a good "war movie" but it is still a very good film in my books.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by skoblin View Post
            I think the problem here is that "The Thin Red Line" is not a war movie - at least according to the traditional understanding. Nor is it an "anti-war movie". Rather, it is a philosophical study of men in combat - the same as the book was. The constant voice overs were an integral part of the film, as the film deals with the thoughts, feelings, and notions that go through minds of soldiers before, during and after battle - and these feelings and thoughts often have nothing to do with the actual combat they are experiencing. If you bother reading about the author of the book, James Jones, you will see that he actually had combat experience at Guadalcanal, and the movie - although naturally limited in the ability to fully represent a book - is a general faithful representation of Jone's work - which was never intended to be a factual narrative of Guadalcanal. You cannot compare it to Saving Private Ryan or Band of Brothers, simply because it was never intended to be same type of movie. If you are looking for an equivalent, you would have to consider the Soviet movie - Idi i Smotri or perhaps the German film Die Brucke. I will agree - it is not a good "war movie" but it is still a very good film in my books.
            I wasn't aware that the author was at Guadalcanal however in defense of my assessment the views he puts forth I have not seen widely represented in other soldiers memoirs.

            Take for example the whole "this great evil - where did it come from" quote. Most WWII vets weren't so confused about where this "great evil" came from. It came from the Third Reich and Imperial Japan.

            I'm pretty sure most vets aren't dreaming of home in the middle of a firefight either. I've never been in a gun battle but I've been in situations where my life was in danger and my adrenaline was in game on mode and I can tell you that home life isn't the first thing on your mind. When a go-kart accident occured around me and there was metal flying everywhere I didn't think of Mom, I was paying more attention to navigating through pileup so I didn't join it.

            As for war turning men into animals. The accounts of troops I have read show a great deal of professionalism and restraint, not a gradual slide into animalistic barbarity.

            Because of these rather odd viewpoints I was inclined to believe that the story's author was wholly unaquainted with military life.
            A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
              I was browsing through IMDB and thought it would be fun to read some reviews of some bad movies. So I checked reviews for The Thin Red Line. It's amazing how many people thought that poorly filmed snooze fest was an excellent film. Here are some excerpts:



              Well at least the first part was right.



              Actually it kind of blows off historical fact altogether.



              As few lines as he had?! He wouldn't shut up until the Japanese shot him and put a merciful end to his annoying voice overs.



              So did I, that's three hours of my life I'll never get back.


              I cheered when Nolte died.
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

              Comment


              • #8
                The Thin Red Line is a flawed movie to be sure, but I also bought it on DVD because I enjoy watching it still.


                Having read the book myself, I tend to agree with Skoblin. I don't consider the movie a "War Movie" in the traditional sense. It's more of a study of human psychology wrapped up in an art house film. In some ways it succeeds and in others it doesn't. However even with it's flaws, I think that it's worth keeping around if for no other reason than to wonder around in the dreamlike state that this movie takes you to.



                Ben
                "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."— Bertrand Russell

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                • #9
                  The only way I might be able to enjoy TRL is if I used drugs from the '70's. How it was ever nominated for an Oscar is beyond me.
                  Lance W.

                  Peace through superior firepower.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
                    I wasn't aware that the author was at Guadalcanal however in defense of my assessment the views he puts forth I have not seen widely represented in other soldiers memoirs.

                    Take for example the whole "this great evil - where did it come from" quote. Most WWII vets weren't so confused about where this "great evil" came from. It came from the Third Reich and Imperial Japan.
                    The line "This great evil - where did it come from?" does not refer to the Second World War. It questions what is the origin of human conflict in general, what sets man against man. The answer - of course - is not Japan.

                    Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
                    I'm pretty sure most vets aren't dreaming of home in the middle of a firefight either. I've never been in a gun battle but I've been in situations where my life was in danger and my adrenaline was in game on mode and I can tell you that home life isn't the first thing on your mind. When a go-kart accident occured around me and there was metal flying everywhere I didn't think of Mom, I was paying more attention to navigating through pileup so I didn't join it.
                    Interestingly enough, you'll find the same sort of references to somewhat disembodied experiences during combat, reflecting on loved ones while shells are raining down, in other literary works about war written by former soldiers, such as Theodore Plievier's Stalingrad (Plievier served in the German High Seas fleet) and Willi Heinrich's The Iron Cross (served on the Eastern Front).
                    Last edited by Skoblin; 17 Jun 09, 19:15.

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                    • #11
                      And in letters written home during the Great War, but only in periods of calm when reflection is possible.

                      No one philosophizes in the midst of combat.
                      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by pirateship1982 View Post
                        I was browsing through IMDB and thought it would be fun to read some reviews of some bad movies. So I checked reviews for The Thin Red Line. It's amazing how many people thought that poorly filmed snooze fest was an excellent film.
                        Nice troll...

                        Just who determines whether a movie is bad or not? Me? You? Oh, that's right...each individual gets to decide for their own reasons. It's subjective.

                        It takes a bit of philosophy to grasp the nuances of Malick's work, and not everyone is capable of that. It's a shame you didn't like it. All of his films are thoughtful, beautifully filmed, and try to raise questions within the viewer. Try watching Days of Heaven, Badlands, or The New World and see if you can start to understand what he's trying to do.

                        Or maybe you'd be better off just watching the Left Behind series. It's pretty obvious what they're selling.
                        Love. Where does it come from?
                        from The Thin Red Line

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I saw the movie and thought it was awful. A fly could carry off my memories of the film.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                            Nice troll...
                            That's a bit harsh. A trollish statement is a comment designed to inflame people and is usually restricted to religion and politics. If stating that a movie sucked is being trollish then there are nothing but trolls on this forum. We all have movies we feel should never have been filmed.

                            Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                            Just who determines whether a movie is bad or not? Me? You? Oh, that's right...each individual gets to decide for their own reasons. It's subjective.
                            When did I say it wasn't?

                            Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                            It takes a bit of philosophy to grasp the nuances of Malick's work, and not everyone is capable of that.
                            No offense but I always laugh at the "you didn't get what I was going for" argument. The classic argument of many a bombmaker: that the critics didn't grasp the movie. In my opinion there was nothing to grasp.

                            Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                            It's a shame you didn't like it.
                            It is a shame. The pacific theatre gets so little coverage I was hoping for a film I would enjoy.

                            Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                            All of his films are thoughtful, beautifully filmed, and try to raise questions within the viewer. Try watching Days of Heaven, Badlands, or The New World and see if you can start to understand what he's trying to do.
                            The New World was marginally better I will admit. Excellent scenery, the movie is very visually appealing and was filmed in a much better fashion than TRL but ultimately it fails for the same reason. When I watch a movie I want a steadily advancing plot, not an endless stream of half baked philosophical/romantic voice overs. Kill the prolonged voice overs and sharpen up the dialogue and character development and for heaven's sake keep the story moving and The New World would be a good film.

                            Originally posted by Dolley View Post
                            Or maybe you'd be better off just watching the Left Behind series. It's pretty obvious what they're selling.
                            Didn't really care for the movies myself. Or the books.
                            A new life awaits you in the off world colonies; the chance to begin again in a golden land of opportunity and adventure!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Imdb

                              I like to reference IMDB for movies that I havn't seen, but seem interesting.

                              Basically I look for the spoilers...as opinions about a person's good or bad experiences with a film can be subjective....

                              When I come to a movie that has ten pages of reviews I think that's a little excessive and redundant, because the essence of the reviews becomes quite repetitive. Usually I can get a feel for a movie and decide whether or not I want to see it by reading 2 or 3 pages of reviews, after those first 3, 4 max. pages of reviews, I'm flogging the proverbial stinking dead horse.

                              So what was the topic? IMDB, or 'The Thin Red Line'?

                              I saw 'The Thin Red Line' twice. I liked it and understood it better after the second viewing.

                              It's important to know that the script is not an emphasis on "action." It's based on the book by James Jones, who was an Army infantry combat veteran of WWII PTO.

                              Any war-fiction by a bona-fide combat veteran always carries weight with me, and I try not to be overly critical as I know that the writing is subjective to each author's experience.

                              Life is precious, but also cheap. For without war, there is no peace. GS ~ A Soldier's Ghost. A Warrior's Soul.

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