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The greatest historical mistakes in movies...

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  • #61
    It would have been better if they were just in a single campaign, so that the film producers of that movie could have had less stuff to mess up (like the Battle of Britain, Peral Harbor, etc.).

    What makes me sad is the fact that some people look at that film and take everything 100% accurate
    Best regards, Hufflepuff

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    • #62
      Originally posted by kendrick View Post
      The 1937 version of 'The charge of the light Brigade' starting Errol Flynn. In this film the charge was not a result of a command blunder but the light brigade seeking revenge on a Indian Prince who had killed British civilians during the Indian Mutiny, even though in fact the Crimean War occured before the Indian Mutiny.

      Also dozens of horse were killed in the course of the filming.
      Was Flynn ever in a historically accurate movie.
      If the art of war were nothing but the art of avoiding risks,glory would become the prey of mediocre minds. Napoleon

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      • #63
        Originally posted by Naffenea View Post
        Here is my biggest gripe about Pearl Harbor. The angle deck carrier they use for the Dolittle raid. No expense was spared, but they couldn't pay for some extra cgi to cover up the obviously modern carrier.
        They even managed to offend me as a Brit, when they had serving USAAF pilots volunteering for service in the RAF Eagle squadrons with the full permission of their high command, at a time when the US was neutral.
        In reality, the RAF was banned from enrolling even ex-USAAF or USN pilots, as the US feared this would break their neutrality laws. :

        And as for fighting the Battle Of Britain in 1941........
        Last edited by redcoat; 12 Oct 08, 17:14.

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        • #64
          I was watching the current version of "the Alamo" today as I was getting ready for work. I saw "Sam Houston" get up and say he would raise an Army of Texans and go relieve the Alamo, but the duty of everybody present was to get a government together that would be recognized by all the world. Sam Houston had already sent word to the Alamo and Goliad to blow the missions up and fall back to where could use them to form an army. When Sam first heard that Santa Ana was in Bexar he claimed it was a lie and proceeded to get drunk for several days on eggnog. He had already resigned his commission as general of the Texas Regulars.

          Lots of fiction in this movie, although I believe Travis, Crockett and Bowie were played well. Although Bowie was over 6 foot tall and blond and blue eyed the actor portraying him made me believe he was a "killing gentleman" and Bowie was! Travis was an ass and Crockett was pretty well as played. I wish they had shown as well it was in Crockett's character to surrender and be executed with the other Texans that tried to jump the walls and flee.

          Pruitt
          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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          • #65
            Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
            Lots of fiction in this movie, although I believe Travis, Crockett and Bowie were played well. Although Bowie was over 6 foot tall and blond and blue eyed the actor portraying him made me believe he was a "killing gentleman" and Bowie was! Travis was an ass and Crockett was pretty well as played. I wish they had shown as well it was in Crockett's character to surrender and be executed with the other Texans that tried to jump the walls and flee.
            My biggest gripe with this Alamo movie was the fact it was Disney picture - which pretty much ensured it would be a PG movie - I don't think it was rated any higher than that. And a rating like that will never do a war film proper justice.

            I read that originally Russell Crowe was to play Houston and Ethan Hawke as Travis, with Ron Howard directing - but they all abandoned ship over creative differences, and Dennis Quaid and Jason Patrick came aboard with a relatively unknown director in John Lee Hancock taking over. I often wonder what that version would have looked like....

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            • #66
              Originally posted by Outrider View Post
              I think I've heard that both Platoon and We were Soldiers are accurate by an equal number of vets...go figure. And it is ironic that Platoon with it's depiction of the soldiers is the one that is "Dedicated to the men who fought and died in the Vietnam War".
              There's probably some truth to them both being considered accurate by vets, it just depends on when they served. "..Soldiers" showed the very professional army of 1965, while 'Platoon" depicts the conscrips of perhaps 1970 (or later) when they length of the war and political tension at home had entered the mindset of the typical "grunt".
              Lance W.

              Peace through superior firepower.

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              • #67
                The Patriot for me, I was absolutely appalled. Mel Gibson portrayed the British as little better than the Nazis.
                There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. -Henry Kissinger

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                • #68
                  It might have been said before, but I'll say it again: Saving Private Ryan.
                  Sail on Britannia.

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                  • #69
                    "To Hell and Back"

                    Audie Murphy said himself that "we missed it by a mile" when they made this film about him.
                    Best regards, Hufflepuff

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                    • #70
                      Originally posted by redcoat View Post
                      They even managed to offend me as a Brit, when they had serving USAAF pilots volunteering for service in the RAF Eagle squadrons with the full permission of their high command, at a time when the US was neutral.
                      In reality, the RAF was banned from enrolling even ex-USAAF or USN pilots, as the US feared this would break their neutrality laws. :

                      And as for fighting the Battle Of Britain in 1941........
                      Quite true.......the pilots that did serve in the Eagle squadron had to go to great lengths to get out of the US, usually they crossed into Canada under some assumed name.
                      Lance W.

                      Peace through superior firepower.

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                      • #71
                        A thing that I found out from "Gods and Generals" is the scene where a Confederate officer holds his fire and cheers his fellow Union Irishmen is based on a postwar myth that the Confederates, at Fredericksburg, held thier fire and cheered thier Irish comrades coming to kill them.
                        In fact, the reports from men who were there show that this is just the opposite of what actually happened historically. The Confederate veterans and Union veterans recall no mercy whatsoever, and, contrary, there was rage among the Rebel Irishmen (it was said that they almost took joy i killing their countrymen, who they felt had betrayed them).
                        Best regards, Hufflepuff

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                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Legate View Post
                          Was Flynn ever in a historically accurate movie.
                          Robin Hood .
                          How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                          Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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                          • #73
                            Originally posted by Napoleon View Post
                            The Patriot for me, I was absolutely appalled. Mel Gibson portrayed the British as little better than the Nazis.
                            We don't mind being denigraded, but just do it properly. His Braveheart was not the most accurate film in terms of history, but its soul was. Yet I have yet to meet an Englishman who didn't enjoy the film.
                            How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
                            Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

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                            • #74
                              How could we have forgotten the tripe that is GI Jane or Tigerland? Gladiator is a good story but has it's inaccuracies. Has the Last Samurai made this list yet?

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                              • #75
                                Windtalkers. Nicholas Cage.

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