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Nazi Ruins Series

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  • Nazi Ruins Series

    New series featuring remains of Nazi fortifications, factories, tunnel complexes and anything else that turns up. Yesterday's was a documentary exploring the incredible DAG (Dynamite AG) ammunition complex hidden so well in the Polish forest that it wasn't by the Allies at all during the war, and only found by the Russians when troops on foot scouted the area.

    The structures were built into the hilly terrain and covered with natural landscaping, trees and bushes even on the roofs. The roads were original footpaths that were widened to single lane and then painted to resemble dirt, brush and ground cover so that aerial reconnaissance would see nothing.

    10 square miles, 240 km of roads, 20 km of railroad tracks and all specifically designed to safely handle explosives including nitro, nitrocellulose, smokeless powder and so forth, and which produced on its own one-third of the munitions used on the Eastern front. The nitro rooms had lead floors to ground static electricity and gravity-fed piping to move the nitro from building to building with any electrical pumps or valves.

    The extent to which the design limited accidental blast damage while maintaining 24/7 production until five days before the arrival of Soviet ground troops is amazing.

    Here you see a space designed for a single worker with solid walls on three sides and a glass/wood "blast wall" designed to vent the blast outwards with minimal damage to equipment so that it could be quickly placed back in operation. Fatal to the worker, of course.
    The glass, BTW, is extra thick with a layer of chicken wire embedded in t to keep the fragments large and cut down on flying glass shrapnel, while outside the ground is sloped upwards to contain any blast fragments and shrapnel from striking anything else.

    The nitro mixing chambers also had sloping ceilings with rounded corners and skylights to vent an explosion upwards.

    Throughout the entire complex, no door was directly opposite any other door in order to avoid sympathetic explosions caused by flying debris.

    Also interesting were the "emergency escape" tunnels (with multiple turns and right angle corners to slow down and dampen the blast) and personnel shelters constructed to create a false sense of safety or the works, who, of course, could not possibly have covered the necessary distance in the brief nanoseconds before the explosion obliterated them, but the German engineers discovered that no one wanted to work there without the false hope they represented.



    Last edited by Mountain Man; 11 Oct 19, 18:09.
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    The upper loading chamber for nitrocellulose leading to the mixers below:

    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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    • #3
      Factory roads within the complex:





      Last edited by Mountain Man; 11 Oct 19, 18:26.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

      Comment


      • #4
        sometimes you wonder how they lost...…….

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jeffdoorgunnr View Post
          sometimes you wonder how they lost...…….
          From the looks of tih\\hings, they spent way too much time and effort on building monolithic structures. They were awfully good at it, tohugh.
          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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