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  • #31
    Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
    ON SET - What movie?

    Dd09n2BVAAAJi9C.jpg
    I'M STILL STUMPED

    DOLLY READ MARTIN AND DICK MARTIN- DIVORCED 1974- re married 1978 until his death 2008.

    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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    • #32
      Originally posted by marktwain View Post

      I'M STILL STUMPED

      DOLLY READ MARTIN AND DICK MARTIN- DIVORCED 1974- re married 1978 until his death 2008.
      The Dirty Dozen!
      Trying hard to be the Man, that my Dog believes I am!

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      • #33
        lf0Moqv[1].png

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        • #34
          BACK-STORY - Das Boot

          "Das Boot" ("The Boat") is a German submarine movie directed by Wolfgang Petersen. Originally the movie was going to be made by John Sturges starring Robert Redford and then by Don Siegel starring Paul Newman. Thankfully, both projects fell through. It is based on the novel by Lothar-Gunther Buchheim. Although fictional, Buchheim used his experience as a correspondent on U-96 on a tour in 1941. The Werner (Herbert Gronemeyer) character is based on Buchheim. Buchheim began as a technical adviser, but had a falling out with Petersen because of what Buchheim considered unrealistically enhanced dramatic license. The movie took three years to produce (1979-81) and was the most expensive German film up to then. It was released in 1981 at 150 minutes and then shown as a miniseries at 300 minutes. The version I am reviewing is the definitive Director's Cut which clocks in at 209 minutes. The original version was a big hit in Germany and the U.S. It was an even bigger critical success. It was nominated for Academy Awards for Director, Cinematography, Adapted Screenplay (Petersen), Film Editing, Sound, and Sound Effects Editing. Stunningly, it was not nominated for Foreign Film.

          HP2620_9add9d61-17c9-4c15-8978-b430cc58dd40_1024x1024.jpg?v=1515503946.jpg

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          • #35
            TRIVIA - The Manchurian Candidate

            mentalfloss
            1. United Artists did not want to make the film because of the political controversy. Frank Sinatra went to Pres. Kennedy who was a big fan of the novel. Kennedy contacted the studio head and got him to change his mind.
            2. Angela Lansbury was only three years older than her "son" Laurence Harvey.
            3. The movie came out in the midst of the Cuban Missile Crisis.
            4. When Marco visits Raymond in his hotel room towards the end of the film, Sinatra is filmed out of focus. Critics lauded this cinematography for showing Raymond's distorted perspective. Actually, the assistant cameraman screwed up the shot and director Frankenheimer was upset and wanted to reshoot it, but he could not get Sinatra to duplicate the performance.
            5. Sinatra wanted Lucille Ball for the Angela Lansbury role.
            6. Sinatra broke a finger in the fight scene with Henry Silva. Later, when he was up for Dirty Harry, he could not grip the pistol properly and had to drop out.
            7. When Laurence Harvey jumped in the lake in Central Park it was so cold that ice had to be broken.
            8. The myth that the movie was pulled after the assassination of Kennedy was not true. It was shown, but rarely because there was not a lot of interest in the film.

            imdb
            9. In the novel, the relationship between Raymond and his mother is more incestuous and she even seduces him. The movie could only go as far as a kiss on the lips. (Surprisingly, the 2004 remake does not even have the kiss.)
            Wikipedia
            10. Mrs. Iselin is #21 on AFI's list of 100 Heroes and Villains.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post


              More about Rommel's book i.e. "Infanterie Greift An" published in 1937, or as later published in English, "Infantry Attacks", from Rommel's foreword:


              Foreword to the 1937 Edition,

              This book describes numerous World War I battles which I experienced as an infantry officer. Remarks are appended to many descriptions in order to extract worthwhile lessons from the particular operation.

              The notes, made directly after combat, will show German youth capable of bearing arms, the unbounded spirit of self-sacrifice and courage with which the German soldier, especially the infantryman, fought for Germany during the four-and-a-half-year war. The following examples are proof of the tremendous combat powers of the German infantry, even when faced with superior odds in men and equipment; and these sketches are again proof of the superiority of the junior German commander to his enemy counterpart.

              Finally, this book should make a contribution towards perpetuating those experiences of the bitter war years; experiences often gained at the cost of great deprivations and bitter sacrifice.

              ERWIN ROMMEL
              Lieutenant Colonel
              Note, unlike Heinz Guderian's book, "Achtung Panzer!", also first published in 1937, it has nothing to do with armoured or mechanized warfare, the words "panzer", "tank", or "armor" don't even appear in the book. It is a narrative history of events experienced by Rommel in WWI, followed by postscript comments on what Rommel learned from what occurred. For example, this is what Rommel wrote after the chapter "Night Attack, September 9-10, 1914", in the Verdun area:

              "Observations: During a night attack it is very easy to fire on one's own people. In the 2nd Battalion we missed doing this by a hair. The night attack of September 9 carried the 2nd Battalion half a mile ahead of the division front, and we reached our assigned objective at a cost of few casualties. Had a continuous advance been undertaken, it would have met with little resistance. The rain favoured the attack. Heavy casualties only occurred when large masses of French were retreating into Rembercourt and while we were entrenching under French artillery fire. Had the French opened up before our trenches were a foot deep, losses would have been higher. A logical conclusion: Plenty of pick-and-shovel work before dawn. Because of ammunition shortage, our own artillery gave us but little support on September 10 and 11; and the French fired unmolested from exposed positions.

              During action the volume of enemy fire was such that the kitchens came up only after dark. During the day they were several miles behind the front. The men quickly became accustomed to this manner of eating."
              From the Publisher's Note in my copy i.e. published in 1979:

              "The US Army translated the book in 1943 and General George Patton became familiar with it. Patton was reportedly ―electrified by the book, and read it again and again until he knew it by heart. Other American officers also took a keen interest in the book and an abridged edition was published in 1944 by the ―Infantry Journal under the title Infantry Attacks."
              It's easy to see the practical info. WWII US Army officers could glean from Rommel's book, but experience, or "how to" of modern mechanized armoured warfare according to Erwin Rommel it is not.

              Back to the movie "Patton". Apparently, as shown in the film, when George Patton says to himself, "Rommel you magnificent bastard ... I read your book", watching a tank/infantry duel during the "Battle of El Guettar", 23 March - 3 April 1943, he isn't actually referring to "Infanterie Greift An", rather he's referring to the book shown on his nightstand in an earlier scene, "The Tank in Attack (Panzer Greift An)", a book that Rommel may have planned to write, but never completed.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infantry_Attacks

              NOTE: I don't recollect the title of the book shown on the nightstand in the movie, nor have I been able to find video or a still of the scene for confirmation.
              Last edited by Marmat; 09 Jul 19, 09:38.
              "I am Groot"
              - Groot

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              • #37
                MOVIE QUIZ

                end-of-mrs-miniver1.jpg?w=500.jpg

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
                  Mrs. Miniver!
                  "I am Groot"
                  - Groot

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                  • #39
                    The Vicar's speech at the end (called the Wilcoxon speech after the actor - who co-wrote it with director William Wyler) of "Mrs. Miniver" was printed in Look and Time magazines. FDR encouraged its broadcasting on Voice of America and the dropping of it in leaflet form over occupied Europe.

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                    • #40
                      QUOTE - "When I go home people will ask me, 'Hey Hoot, why do you do it man? What, you some kinda war junkie?' You know what I'll say? I won't say a ******* word. Why? They won't understand. They won't understand why we do it. They won't understand that it's about the men next to you, and that's it. That's all it is.- Norman "Hoot" Hooten, "Black Hawk Down" (2001)

                      Eric-Bana-Sergeant-First-Class-Norm-Hoot-Hooten-Black-Hawk-Down.gif

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                      • #41
                        FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION - Restrepo

                        "Restrepo" is the movie companion to the acclaimed best seller War by Sebastian Junger. Junger was a reporter who embedded with an infantry platoon in Afghanistan in 2007-8 to get an eyewitness look at the fighting. What came out of his experience is a grunts-eye view of the war that takes the viewer into a very foreign world where American boys are fighting a forgotten war. If you feel guilty about having forgotten about their sacrifices or if you want to know what is going on over there, you should watch this outstanding documentary.

                        The movie is seen through the eyes of the cameramen (Junger and Tim Hetherington) who lived with the soldiers interspersed with frequent interviews with the troops after they got back. The men belong to the Second Platoon, Battle Company, 2nd Battalion, 503rd Infantry Regiment which was sent to the most dangerous place in Afghanistan - the Kerengal Valley. They were deployed for 15 months and three of them did not come back including Juan "Doc" Restrepo. Their mission was to provide security for a road-building project that would benefit the obviously ungrateful residents. But based on the book and film, it is apparent their mission was to deprive the Taliban of control of the valley and kill as many of them in the process as possible.

                        Restrepo-Poster500.jpg

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                        • #42
                          Hay warmoviebuff have you seen a Russian flick called
                          T34
                          I'd love to dknow what you make of it
                          Last edited by ROOBARB; 11 Jul 19, 15:28.
                          BE PURE! BE VIGILANT! BEHAVE!

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                          • #43
                            ON SET - What movie?

                            3aede81247735f142e1a9016cdc94939.jpg

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
                              Bridges at Toko-Ri again! The lovely Grace Kelly.
                              "I am Groot"
                              - Groot

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                              • #45
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