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  • TRIVIA - She Wore a Yellow Ribbon

    Wikipedia, imdb, TCM
    1. It was the second in John Ford’s cavalry trilogy coming between “Fort Apache” and “Rio Grande”.
    2. Cinematographer Winton Hoch based some of the scenes on sculptures and paintings by Frederic Remington. This means the film links the two men most responsible for our image of the West – John Ford and Frederic Remington. Hoch won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Color. Part of the reason for his win is the iconic thunder storm scene. Supposedly, Hoch was shutting down filming when the storm appeared on the horizon. Ford demanded he continue shooting despite Hoch claiming the lighting was not sufficient and mentioning the threat of lightning. Hoch filed a complaint with the American Society of Cinematographers.
    3. Ford did not want John Wayne because he was uncomfortable with Wayne playing a character twenty years older. Wayne was 41 at the time. Ford changed his mind after seeing Wayne in “Red River”, remarking that the SOB could actually act.
    4. Wayne felt it was one of his favorite roles and thought he should have been nominated for Brittles instead of Stryker in “Sands of Iwo Jima”. He was bitter due to the critics not praising him for expanding his range and claimed that the result caused him to never stretch again. “The Searchers” seems to refute this.
    5. Ben Johnson rode the famous horse “Steel”. “Steel” had a lot of charisma, but was easy to ride. The horse made a lot of money for Johnson’s father-in-law who ran a horse-renting business. If you wanted to use “Steel”, you had to rent all the other horses from him. “Steel” had his own double for galloping scenes. He was ridden by Wayne in “Tall in the Saddle”, Gregory Peck in “Yellow Sky”, and Randolph Scott in “The Tall T”.

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      • "Hancock, I've got lunatics laughing at me from the woods. My original plan has been scuppered now that the jeeps haven't arrived. My communications are completely broken down. Do you really believe any of that can be helped by a cup of tea?" - Major General Urquhart (Sean Connery) on being offered a cup of tea by Corporal Hancock (Colin Farrell) in the film A Bridge Too Far.

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        • FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION - Tunes of Glory

          “Tunes of Glory” is a British service film released in 1960. It was directed by Ronald Neame from a novel by James Kennaway. Kennaway adapted his novel for the screenplay and adjusted it significantly to make the movie plot better than the novel. His script was nominated for an Academy Award. He served in the Gordan Highlanders. The title comes from the bagpiping at regimental ceremonies.

          The movie opens with bagpipers entertaining officers at a dinner in a Scottish Highlander regimental barracks in the post-WWII period. Maj. Jock Sinclair (Alec Guinness) presides like a frat president. He chastises a young officer for not smoking his cigarette like a man. Sinclair announces he is being superseded by a new commander. These seems unfair considering that he led the regiment through the war after their commander was killed. Sinclair had risen through the ranks after starting as a piper.

          The new commander is a Lt. Col. Barrow (John Mills). Barrow is the polar opposite of Sinclair. He is upper class and graduated from Oxford. He spent the last part of the war in a Japanese prison camp. He is now in command because his family is associated with the regiment. While Sinclair is a drunken, arrogant bonhomme who is loved by his men. Barrow is an officious martinet. Both men have been effected by their war experience. Sinclair is still addicted to the camaraderie and only results matter mentality. Barrow is obviously suffering from the mental consequences of his Japanese imprisonment. It is implied that he was tortured. These two are headed for a confrontation of epic and entertaining proportions.

          “Tunes of Glory” is worth seeing mainly for the great acting. Guinness and Mills are fantastic and the rest of the cast hangs with them. The two leads do not chew the scenery although it must have been tempting to. Susannah York is nice eye candy in her first role. The acting must have been the main reason the movie was so positively received by critics.
          “Tunes of Glory” deserves to be seen. It is instructive on the role of class distinctions in the British Army. No army is history has had such a strong dynamic. It’s amazing that it was still strong even after WWII. The movie also is strong in depicting the varied effects of wartime experiences on peacetime officers. It is one of the best character studies set in a peacetime army setting.

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          • Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
            FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION - Tunes of Glory

            “Tunes of Glory” is a British service film released in 1960. It was directed by Ronald Neame from a novel by James Kennaway. Kennaway adapted his novel for the screenplay and adjusted it significantly to make the movie plot better than the novel. His script was nominated for an Academy Award. He served in the Gordan Highlanders. The title comes from the bagpiping at regimental ceremonies.

            The movie opens with bagpipers entertaining officers at a dinner in a Scottish Highlander regimental barracks in the post-WWII period. Maj. Jock Sinclair (Alec Guinness) presides like a frat president. He chastises a young officer for not smoking his cigarette like a man. Sinclair announces he is being superseded by a new commander. These seems unfair considering that he led the regiment through the war after their commander was killed. Sinclair had risen through the ranks after starting as a piper.

            The new commander is a Lt. Col. Barrow (John Mills). Barrow is the polar opposite of Sinclair. He is upper class and graduated from Oxford. He spent the last part of the war in a Japanese prison camp. He is now in command because his family is associated with the regiment. While Sinclair is a drunken, arrogant bonhomme who is loved by his men. Barrow is an officious martinet. Both men have been effected by their war experience. Sinclair is still addicted to the camaraderie and only results matter mentality. Barrow is obviously suffering from the mental consequences of his Japanese imprisonment. It is implied that he was tortured. These two are headed for a confrontation of epic and entertaining proportions.

            “Tunes of Glory” is worth seeing mainly for the great acting. Guinness and Mills are fantastic and the rest of the cast hangs with them. The two leads do not chew the scenery although it must have been tempting to. Susannah York is nice eye candy in her first role. The acting must have been the main reason the movie was so positively received by critics.
            “Tunes of Glory” deserves to be seen. It is instructive on the role of class distinctions in the British Army. No army is history has had such a strong dynamic. It’s amazing that it was still strong even after WWII. The movie also is strong in depicting the varied effects of wartime experiences on peacetime officers. It is one of the best character studies set in a peacetime army setting.
            A very fine film and an acting tour de force by Guinness and Mills. I read somewhere that it was a virtual toss-up between the two actors as to which part either would take. Guinness could equally have played Barrow and Mills Sinclair without losing effect.
            "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
            Samuel Johnson.

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              • dude-have-a-snickers-yougoall-eul-metal-why-when-youte-49109304.png

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                • BACK-STORY - Sergeant York

                  “Sergeant York” is one of the great American classic war movies. It was directed by Howard Hawks (“Air Force”, the original “Dawn Patrol”) and starred the biggest Hollywood star of that time – Gary Cooper. It was the first major American biopic that told the story of a living person. The desire to avoid law suits and controversy led to great efforts by the studio to keep the film accurate and authentic. Of course, the main effort was to keep Alvin York happy. York (true to his portrayal at the end of the movie) was not interested in taking advantage of his fame. However, persistence on the part of producer Jesse Lasky eventually wore York down. York drove a hard bargain and insisted on veto power over the screenplay and would accept only Cooper playing him. The movie was a huge success and was the highest grossing film of 1941. (The studio insisted on the outrageously high ticket price of $2.20!) The movie was also critically acclaimed and garnered eleven Academy Award nominations, winning for Best Actor (Cooper over Welles in “Citizen Kane”) and editing.

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                  • TRIVIA - Catch-22

                    Wikipedia, imdb, Guts and Glory
                    1. Joseph Heller was pleased with the film and praised the changes and additions by screenwriter Buck Henry.
                    2. The aerial sequences took six months and 1,500 hours of flying time. All of this resulted in ten minutes of screen time.
                    3. The film used 17 flyable B-25 Mitchell bombers.
                    4. The Second Unit Director John Jordan refused to use a safety harness to film from one of the bombers and fell to his death.
                    5. This was the first American movie to show a character (Martin Balsam’s Col. Cathcart) on the toilet. Balsam claims it is the greatest moment of his career. Just kidding.
                    6. This was Art Garfunkel’s first film. Paul Simon was supposed to also appear, but his role got cut. The film caused Garfunkel to be late for a recording session with his partner and Simon wrote a critical song about Art because of this.
                    7. Heller was a bombardier on B-25s. On one mission, a gunner was wounded and bled all over him.

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