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  • #16
    THEY DIED WITH THEIR BOOTS ON

    Wikipedia, imdb, TCM
    1. Three died during the filming. One fell from his horse and broke his neck. A stuntman died of a heart attack. Actor Jack Budlong was thrown from his horse as he rode alongside Errol Flynn and was impaled by his sword.
    2. Only sixteen Sioux were available as extras and they were used for the closeups. The rest of the more than 1,000 extras were Filipinos.
    3. Jim Thorpe was an extra and he got into a fight with Flynn during a break. Thorpe knocked him down with one punch while Flynn was in uniform.
    4. Louis Zamperini of “Unbroken” fame, was also an extra.
    5. This was the eighth and last pairing of Flynn and Olivia de Havilland. Her sister Joan Fontaine was originally supposed to play Libby.
    6. One of the most historically inaccurate war movies ever made. If you see the movie and don't want to research the topic, just be aware that Custer was not a hero and he was not a supporter of Indian rights.


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    • #17
      EMPIRE OF THE SUN

      Wikipedia
      1. David Lean was supposed to direct and Steven Spielberg to produce, but Lean dropped out because it was too much like a diary and Spielberg gladly took over because he admired Lean's work, especially "The Bridge on the River Kwai".
      2. Spielberg's father had been a radio operator on a B-25 Mitchell in the China-Burma Theater.
      3. Christian Bale was cast over 4,000 auditioners partly because author J.G. Ballard felt he resembled him at that age. Bale was aided by Amy Irving (Spielberg's wife at that time) who had co-starred with him in "Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna".
      4. Academy Award nominations for: Art Direction, Cinematography, Editing, Original Music Score, Costume Design, and Sound.

      imdb
      5. One of the Zeros (which were actually modified Harvard trainers) was flown by Tom Danaher, a Marine night fighter pilot from WWII who shot down the last Japanese bomber in the war.
      6. The scene where Jim is tucked in by his parents was modeled after the Norman Rockwell painting for FDR's "Freedom from Fear". The painting is on the wall in the prison camp.
      7. Ballard appears as an extra in the party scene.



      Last edited by warmoviebuff; 20 Jul 18, 07:59.

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      • #18
        LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL

        wikipedia
        1. Roberto Benigni wrote the screenplay partly based on his father who spent two years in a German labor camp in WWII. His father told his children about his experiences using humor.
        2. The movie was nominated for Oscars for: Picture, Director, Original Screenplay, Editing. It won for: Actor, Foreign Language Film, Original Dramatic Score.

        imdb
        3. Guido's wife Dora was played by Benigni's wife Nicoletta Braschi.
        4. The title comes from a line Trotsky said to his wife in Mexico around the time he was assassinated by Stalin's agents.
        5. It was the second time a Best Actor winner was directed by himself. The first was Laurence Olivier in "Hamlet".
        6. The movie was only the second time a picture was nominated for both Best Picture and Best Foreign Language Film. The first was "Z" in 1969.
        7. Benigni was only the fourth person nominated for Director, Actor, and Screenplay. The others were Orson Welles ("Citizen Kane"), Woody Allen ("Annie Hall"), and Warren Beatty ("Heaven Can Wait" and "Reds"). Raise your hand if you think he belongs in their company.

        Shmoop
        8. Benigni was the second actor to win Best Actor for a Foreign Film. First was Sophia Loren for "Two Women".
        9. Benigni is in the select company of Best Actor winners who also got a Razzie (for "Pinocchio"). The others were Halle Berry, Kevin Costner, Liza Minelli, Sandra Bullock, and Laurence Olivier.

        Last edited by warmoviebuff; 20 Jul 18, 07:57.

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        • #19
          TWELVE O'CLOCK HIGH

          Classic Movie Hub
          1. The term "twelve o'clock high" refers to the position of German fighters. If you imagine the bomber as the center of a clock, twelve o'clock would be directly ahead and six o'clock is directly to the rear. "High" refers to the position of the fighter relative to the bomber's elevation. So the title means the attacker is in front of and above the bomber.
          2. John Wayne turned down the role and many other leading men were considered until Gregory Peck landed it. Peck was not originally interested because he felt it was too much like "Command Decision". He changed his mind when he decided he wanted to work with director Henry King. They made five more movies after it.
          3. The Robin Hood mug prop became a prized possession of Frank Armstrong's (the real-life Savage) family. It was stolen in a break-in and never recovered.
          4. The book had a romantic subplot that was removed to concentrate on the psychological impact of aerial bombing and the pressures of command.
          5. Maj. Joe Cobb was based on Paul Tibbetts, the pilot of the Enola Gay.
          6. The 918th Bombing Group was based on the 306th which was the first bombing group to bomb Germany (Wilhelmshaven). Frank Armstrong led the mission.
          7. The release was postponed several months because of the similarly themed "Command Decision".

          Guts and Glory
          8. Stunt pilot Paul Mantz was paid the astronomical sum of $4,500 for the belly-crash landing. The footage was reused in "The War Lover" and "Midway". Mantz was the premiere Hollywood stunt pilot and had performed more than 90 crashes. For this one he rigged up the controls so he could fly the plane alone.
          9. The Air Force was very happy with the script and suggested only three significant revisions. It did not want Savage's breakdown to be irrational and hysterical, so the scene was changed to a more subtle slide into a comatose state. It asked that the drinking be toned down and that the Chaplain observe a poker game instead of participating.
          10. The USAF provided twelve obsolete B-17s from its Air Service Rescue.

          Wikipedia
          11. The movie was filmed in black and white to seamlessly incorporate aerial footage.
          12. The movie became required viewing at all the service academies and for leadership seminars.
          13. It won Oscars for Best Supporting Actor (Dean Jagger) and Sound Recording. It was nominated for Best Actor (Peck) and Picture (losing to "All the King's Men").

          imdb
          14. The movie has no score backing the scenes.
          Last edited by warmoviebuff; 20 Jul 18, 07:55.

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          • #20
            SHE WORE A YELLOW RIBBON

            Wikipedia, imdb, TCM
            1. It was the second in John Ford’s cavalry trilogy coming between “Fort Apache” and “Rio Grande”.
            2. Cinematographer Winton Hoch based some of the scenes on sculptures and paintings by Frederic Remington. This means the film links the two men most responsible for our image of the West – John Ford and Frederic Remington. Hoch won the Academy Award for Best Cinematography, Color. Part of the reason for his win is the iconic thunder storm scene (see picture). Supposedly, Hoch was shutting down filming when the storm appeared on the horizon. Ford demanded he continue shooting despite Hoch claiming the lighting was not sufficient and mentioning the threat of lightning. Hoch filed a complaint with the American Society of Cinematographers.
            3. Ford did not want John Wayne because he was uncomfortable with Wayne playing a character twenty years older. Wayne was 41 at the time. Ford changed his mind after seeing Wayne in “Red River”, remarking that the SOB could actually act.
            4. Wayne felt it was one of his favorite roles and thought he should have been nominated for Brittles instead of Stryker in “Sands of Iwo Jima”. He was bitter due to the critics not praising him for expanding his range and claimed that the result caused him to never stretch again. “The Searchers” seems to refute this.
            5. Ben Johnson rode the famous horse “Steel”. “Steel” had a lot of charisma, but was easy to ride. The horse made a lot of money for Johnson’s father-in-law who ran a horse-renting business. If you wanted to use “Steel”, you had to rent all the other horses from him. “Steel” had his own double for galloping scenes. He was ridden by Wayne in “Tall in the Saddle”, Gregory Peck in “Yellow Sky”, and Randolph Scott in “The Tall T”.

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            • #21
              CATCH-22

              Wikipedia, imdb, Guts and Glory
              1. Joseph Heller was pleased with the film and praised the changes and additions by screenwriter Buck Henry.
              2. The aerial sequences took six months and 1,500 hours of flying time. All of this resulted in ten minutes of screen time.
              3. The film used 17 flyable B-25 Mitchell bombers.
              4. The Second Unit Director John Jordan refused to use a safety harness to film from one of the bombers and fell to his death.
              5. This was the first American movie to show a character (Martin Balsam’s Col. Cathcart) on the toilet. Balsam claims it is the greatest moment of his career. Just kidding.
              6. This was Art Garfunkel’s first film. Paul Simon was supposed to also appear, but his role got cut. The film caused Garfunkel to be late for a recording session with his partner and Simon wrote a critical song about Art because of this.
              7. Heller was a bombardier on B-25s. On one mission, a gunner was wounded and bled all over him.

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              • #22
                OH! WHAT A LOVELY WAR
                wikipefia, imdb
                1. It is based on a musical play. It was entitled “Oh, what a lovely war!”
                2. Because the Beatles were interested in making an anti-war movie, Paul McCartney met with producer Len Deighton about playing the Smith boys. It could not be arranged.
                3. Richard Attenborough’s directorial debut.
                4. The 16,000 crosses for the final scene were put in pre-dug holes.
                5. The song “La Chanson de Craonne” is about the French army mutiny of 1917. The singing of it was deemed an act of mutiny and it was banned in France in 1974. The French government offered a million franc reward for revealing the author of the song.
                6. No one is shown dying in the film. There is no blood.
                7. The trench scenes were shot at Brighton Municipal Rubbish Dump, in spite of the stench.
                8. The song “The Moon Shines Bright on Charlie Chaplin” was part of a campaign in Great Britain to criticize him for not volunteering for the war. Actually, Chaplin was turned down because he was puny.
                9. Every time a poppy appears, someone dies. Starting with Archduke Franz Ferdinand.
                10. There are 37 songs in the movie.


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                • #23
                  BATTLEGROUND

                  Wikipedia, imdb, TCM, Guts and Glory
                  1. It is considered the first significant post-WWII film about the war.
                  2. It was the pet project of producer Dore Schary. He wanted to make a movie that answered the question “was the war worth it?” Or as the chaplain in the film put it: “was the trip necessary?” He had a hard time getting studio support from RKO where he was production head and when Howard Hughes bought RKO he nixed the project. Schary left RKO because of this after Hughes let him buy the script for a cheap $20,000. Schary returned to production head of MGM, but Louis Mayer was also cold toward the making of a WWII picture. Mayer felt audiences were not interested in WWII movies. But Mayer did not stand in Schary’s way and was hoping he would fail. He called the movie “Schary’s folly”.
                  3. Director William Wellman had the cast put through training by twenty veterans who appeared as extras in the movie.
                  4. Robert Pirosh based his screenplay on his experiences in the Battle of the Bulge. Gen. McAuliffe acted as technical adviser for the script.
                  5. The movie was shot in twenty days less than the schedule and for $100,000 less.
                  6. President Truman was given a private showing before the premiere.
                  7. It won Academy Awards for Cinematography (Black and White) and Screenplay. It was nominated for Best Picture (losing to “All the King’s Men”), Director, Editing, and Supporting Actor (James Whitmore).
                  8. Whitmore was a Marine in the Pacific. He based his characters appearance and attitude partly on Bill Maudlin’s “Willie and Joe”.
                  9. Douglas Fowley (Kippton) had false teeth like his character because he lost his teeth to an explosion while serving on an aircraft carrier in the Pacific.
                  10 James Arness (Garby) was the most decorated cast member. His medals included the Bronze Star and the Purple Heart.
                  11. Robert Taylor was supposed to star in it but decided he did not want to do an ensemble piece. He was replaced by Van Johnson.
                  12. The movie was a big success and finished second at the box office. Its timing and success is comparable to “The Big Parade” which was also predicted to be too late after the war
                  13. It was shot almost totally in a soundstage. Compare its realism to the exterior scenes from “The Battle of the Bulge”.
                  14. Denise Darcel was cast solely for her boobs. Check out the scene where she cuts a loaf of bread precariously close to her greatest assets.
                  15. Wellman preferred his “The Story of G.I. Joe”, finding it more realistic and more a tribute to American soldiers.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by warmoviebuff View Post
                    CATCH-22

                    Wikipedia, imdb, Guts and Glory
                    1. Joseph Heller was pleased with the film and praised the changes and additions by screenwriter Buck Henry.
                    2. The aerial sequences took six months and 1,500 hours of flying time. All of this resulted in ten minutes of screen time.
                    3. The film used 17 flyable B-25 Mitchell bombers.
                    4. The Second Unit Director John Jordan refused to use a safety harness to film from one of the bombers and fell to his death.
                    5. This was the first American movie to show a character (Martin Balsam’s Col. Cathcart) on the toilet. Balsam claims it is the greatest moment of his career. Just kidding.
                    6. This was Art Garfunkel’s first film. Paul Simon was supposed to also appear, but his role got cut. The film caused Garfunkel to be late for a recording session with his partner and Simon wrote a critical song about Art because of this.
                    7. Heller was a bombardier on B-25s. On one mission, a gunner was wounded and bled all over him.
                    The B-25 scenes were filmed in Mexico. I can remember visiting the set after the movie was filmed as a teen. The studio just left it there to rot. They chose to film that in Mexico because there were few, if any, restrictions on how they could fly the planes there at the time.

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                    • #25
                      THREE KINGS

                      Wikipedia, imdb, mental floss
                      1. The movie originated with John Ridley challenging himself to write and sell a script in a short time. He wrote “Spoils of War” in a week and sold it in eighteen days. Director David O. Russell was intrigue by the description “heist set in the Gulf War” and claimed he never actually read the script. Apparently he used just the concept and wrote the movie’s script from scratch. He did not consult with Ridley which created some bad blood. Ridley had to settle for a “story by” credit.
                      2. Russell wrote the Ving character with Spike Jonze in mind, even though Jonze had never acted in a movie.
                      3. The first thought for Gates was Clint Eastwood, but he was too old. Nicholas Cage was going to do it, but ended up doing “Bringing Out the Dead” instead. Clooney campaigned for the role so he could break out of “ER”. Russell was skeptical, but got worn down.
                      4. There was a lot of conflict between Russell and Clooney on the set. Russell tended to be hard on the crew and extras and Clooney took on the role of defender of the little guys. It got so bad that they got into a fist-fight towards the end.
                      5. The show-stopping shot of a bullet going through a body (see below) originated from a conversation Russell had with a doctor. Russell asked him what the worst wound he ever saw was.
                      6. Russell went a little loopy during an interview and told Newsweek that the shot used a real corpse. The studio got a complaint from a mortician’s organization.
                      7. Clooney loves to play pranks and one was catapulting an apple using a car antenna which hit Nora Dunn in the face. He got high fives from the crew, but it really hurt Nora.
                      8. Pres. Clinton requested and got a private screening at the White House.

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